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" Alas, poor Yorick! — I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy, he hath 'borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed... "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text of J ... - Page 100
by William Shakespeare - 1844
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The Ethics of Mourning: Grief and Responsibility in Elegiac Literature

R. Clifton Spargo - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 314 pages
...now found to say of our past," sounds a lot like Hamlet melancholically taunting the skull of Yorick: "Where be your gibes now, your gambols, your songs,...on a roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning?" (5.1.175-77, emphasis added). By echoing Hamlet's "now," in which the deictic declaration of the contemporary...
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Shakespeare Survey: An Annual Survey of Shakespeare Studies and ..., Volume 45

Peter Holland - 2005 - 367 pages
...excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred my imagination is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen! Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - Reference - 2006 - 1067 pages
...poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore become 0 chop-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favor...
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The Best-loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - English literature - 2004 - 160 pages
...infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now . . . Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs?...the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own Act v Sc i The fatal duel The fencing match begins, but during it there is a scuffle and both Hamlet...
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Laughing and Weeping in Early Modern Theatres

Matthew Steggle - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 158 pages
...ability to induce them in others: Yorick the jester. Thus, in Act Five, Hamlet addresses Yorick's skull: Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs?...roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? quite chopfallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, paint an inch thick, to this favor she must...
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The Age of the Warrior: Selected Essays by Robert Fisk

Robert Fisk - Social Science - 2008 - 544 pages
...deeply disturbing contemplation of death: My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kiss'd I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now, your...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning quite chapfall'n? And here is Omar Khayyam's contemplation of a king's skull at Tus - near the modern-day...
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