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" Alas, poor Yorick! — I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy, he hath 'borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed... "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text of J ... - Page 100
by William Shakespeare - 1844
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Great Scenes from Shakespeare's Plays

John Green, Paul Negri - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2000 - 64 pages
...Yorick's skull, the King's jester. HAMLET [Takes the skull]. This? GRAVEDIGGER. E'en that. HAMLET. Alas, poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 336 pages
...times, and now how abhorred in my imagination it is - my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips 190 that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen? Now get you to 195 my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this...
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Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 228 pages
...gravediggers unearth his skull as they prepare Ophelia's grave. This provokes his famous meditation : Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio, a fellow of...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen ? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : the First Folio of 1623 ...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 261 pages
...sir, this same skull, was Yorick's skull - the King's jester.54 Hamlet This? 1 Clown E'en that. Hamlet Let me see. Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio,...merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar? No one now to mock your own jeering? 55 Quite chop-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell...
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Anthropology and Antihumanism in Imperial Germany

Andrew Zimmerman - Social Science - 2010 - 372 pages
...borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rims at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know...on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? -Hamlet, act 5, scene i What so dismayed Hamlet about Yorick's skull was precisely what made the skull...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 405 pages
...every god did seem to set his seal" (3.4.54, 55-56, 60-61). Yorick's skull sets the two forms at odds: Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen? (5.1.182-86) Not only is there no one now to mock the jester's grinning; the skull's grinning...
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Hamlet

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - Drama - 2001 - 32 pages
...infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now . . . Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs?...the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grmmng? ^-^-/S- C_-3 . Act v Sci t— *, *Horatio and Hamlet discover that the grave is for Ophelia....
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Victorian Afterlives: The Shaping of Influence in Nineteenth-century Literature

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, Professor of English Literature and Fellow of Magdalen College Oxford Robert Douglas-Fairhurst - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 372 pages
...poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his back a thousand times, and now — how abhorred...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen?197 338 Under the Influence Tennyson, in the 'chop-house': I kiss the lips I once have...
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Victorian Afterlives: The Shaping of Influence in Nineteenth-century Literature

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 372 pages
...knew him. Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his hack a thousand times, and now — how abhorred in my imagination...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen?t97 '"'' H. Barton Baker, 'The Old Tavern Life', Gmtlemm 'i Magatine, 245 (t879l, 755....
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 35

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 224 pages
...of 'I knew him, Horatio: ... he hath borne me on his back a thousand times ', to direct address: ' Where be your gibes now, your gambols, your songs,...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning - quite chap-fall'n? ' Jolted back into his fool's role, he thus addresses the fool's mirror-image in complete...
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