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" The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not, and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text of J ... - Page 137
by William Shakespeare - 1843
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...that his valor hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...cherished by our virtues. — Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 LORD. The web of our life is of a mingled yam, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud...virtues. Enter a Servant. How now, where 's your master ? SERT. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave ; his lordship will...
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Aids to English Composition, Prepared for Students of All Grades: Embracing ...

Richard Green Parker - English language - 1851 - 429 pages
...277. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie Which we ascribe to heaven. 278. The web of our life is of mingled yarn, Good and ill together: our virtues would...despair if they were not Cherished by our virtues. 279. Let *s take the instant by the forward top; For we are old, and on our quickest decrees The inaudible...
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Aids to English Composition, Prepared for Students of All Grades: Embracing ...

Richard Green Parker - English language - 1851 - 429 pages
...277. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie Which we ascribe to heaven. 278. The web of our life is of mingled yarn, Good and ill together : our virtues...despair if they were not Cherished by our virtues. 279. Let 's take the instant by the forward top ; For we are old, and on our quickest decrees The inaudible...
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Aids to English Composition, Prepared for Students of All Grades: Embracing ...

Richard Green Parker - English language - 1851 - 429 pages
...277. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie Which we ascribe to heaven. 278. The web of our life is of mingled yarn, Good and ill together : our virtues...despair if they were not Cherished by our virtues. 279. Let 's take the instant by the forward top ; For we are old, and on our quickest decrees The inaudible...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. — a SEBVANT. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke in the...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be encountered with a shame as ample. 1 Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. — Enter a SERVANT. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke...
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Aids to English Composition: Prepared for Students of All Grades : Embracing ...

Richard Green Parker - English language - 1852 - 429 pages
...277. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie Which we ascribe to heaven. 278. The web of our life is of mingled yarn, Good and ill together : our virtues...despair if they were not Cherished by our virtues. 279. Let 's take the instant by the forward top ; For we are old, and on our quickest decrees The inaudible...
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THE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE

J. PAYNE COLLIER - 1853
...how many horse the uke is strong." What say you to that ? Fr. Env. I am heartily sorry that he '11 and our right ! K. Phi. It shall be so ;—-[To LEWIS.]...trumpets, to the gates. F. Her. You men of Angiers, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave : his lordship will next morning for France. The duke hath offered...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 884 pages
...confirmations, point from point, to tlie full arming of the verity. Fr. Env. I am heartily sorry that he'll ngs. Bast where's your master? Serv. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave...
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