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" Lear. O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet Heaven ! Keep me in temper : I would not be mad ! — Enter Gentleman. "
The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare - Page 76
by William Shakespeare - 1821
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Lectures Upon Shakspeare

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
...of him had royalized his state, may he some little excuse for Albany's weakness. Ib. sc. 5. Lear. 0 let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven ! Keep me in temper ! I "would not be mad ! — The mind's own anticipation of madness ! The deepest tragic notes are often struck by a half...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 144 pages
...Yes, indeed: thou would'st make a good Fool. LEAR To take't again perforce! Monster Ingratitude! FOOL If thou wert my Fool, Nuncle, I'd have thee beaten for being old before thy time. LEAR How 's that? FOOL Thou should'st not have been old till thou hadst been wise. LEAR O! let me not be...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Fathers and daughters - 2001 - 500 pages
...I believe, scarcely known in England. — ED. Lear. Oh, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven I Keep me in temper; I would not be mad! — [Enter Gentleman] How now! are the horses ready? 4$ Gent. Ready, my lord. Lear. Come, boy. Fool. She that's a maid now and laughs at my departure Shall...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 13

Allardyce Nicoll - Drama - 2002 - 200 pages
...to drive his master mad. At the end of the Act Lear has his first serious premonition of insanity: O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven ! Keep me in temper : I would not be mad ! The second great shock comes in the second act when Lear finds Kent in the stocks. This causes the...
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The Cambridge Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare criticism

Catherine M. S. Alexander - Drama - 2003 - 3 pages
...to drive his master mad. At the end of the Act Lear has his first serious premonition of insanity: O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! Keep me in temper: I would not be mad! The second great shock conies in the second act when Lear finds Kent in the stocks. This causes the...
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Playing Lear

Oliver Ford Davies - Drama - 2003 - 211 pages
...monster ingratitude! How seriously is he thinking of taking back the crown? What is unexpected is, O let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! Keep me in temper, I would not be mad. Is this as a result of something specific - the rejection and cursing of Goneril? Or has he felt for...
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Players of Shakespeare 5, Volume 5

Royal Shakespeare Company - Drama - 2003 - 234 pages
...hath made me mad' (111.1.147-8). These are lines that remind me of King Lear's heart-breaking appeal, 'O let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! / Keep me in temper; I would not be mad'(iv43-4), a fact that encouraged me to play Hamlet's lines as equally genuine and vulnerable. This...
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Understanding King Lear: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and ...

Donna Woodford - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 183 pages
...pushed towards madness over the course of the play. He fights valiantly against it, fervently praying "O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! / Keep me in temper; I would not be mad!" (1 .5.38— 9), but towards the end of the play it is doubtful whether he knows himself even slenderly....
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Shakespeare's King Lear with The Tempest: The Discovery of Nature and the ...

Mark Allen McDonald - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 317 pages
...age, the threat of madness first appears to the King. He leaves Albany stricken with fear and praying: O! Let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven Keep me in temper; I would not be mad At the appearance of the madness of the King, the Fool foresees the destruction of innocence which...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare, Paul Werstine - Drama - 2011 - 384 pages
...To take 't again perforce! Monster ingratitude! FOOL If thou wert my Fool, nuncle, I'd have thee 40 beaten for being old before thy time. LEAR How's that? FOOL Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise. LEAR O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! 45 f Enter Gentleman.^...
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