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" FROM fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial... "
Poems, with illustrative remarks [ed. by W.C. Oulton]. To which is prefixed ... - Page 7
by William Shakespeare - 1804
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Shakespeare and His Comedies

John Russell Brown - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 252 pages
...for another more obviously commercial word : But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed's! thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, . , . There is, of course, a quibble on 'contracted', for besides alluding to a business contract,...
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Cosmic Consciousness: A Study in the Evolution of the Human Mind

Richard Maurice Bucke - Body, Mind & Spirit - 2006 - 404 pages
...memory : But them contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self -substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself...ornament, And only * herald to the gaudy spring. Within thy own bud buriest thy content, And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding. Pity the world, or...
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Young Will: The Confessions of William Shakespeare

Bruce Cook - Fiction - 2005 - 416 pages
...self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou art now the world's fresh ornament, And only herald...thine own bud buriest thy content, And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding, Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the...
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Shakespeare's Sonnets & Poems

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2011 - 704 pages
...particular rhythm or to stress a particular word or phrase. In Sonnet 1 , for example, in lines 5-6 ("But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, /...Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel"), the subject thou is separated from its verb feed's! by a phrase that, because of its placement, focuses...
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Educated Imagination and Other Writings on Critical Theory, 1933-1962

Northrop Frye, Germaine Warkentin - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 553 pages
...each other. You can say with Burns, "My love's like a red, red rose," or you can say with Shakespeare: Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring. [Sonnet i, 11. 9-10] One produces the figure of speech called the simile; the other produces the figure...
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Northrop Frye's Notebooks on Renaissance Literature

Northrop Frye - Literary Collections - 2006 - 494 pages
..."leading up," and cites Sonnets 17, 53, and 106, "or what we have called the 'effusive' sonnets." 21 "Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament, / And only herald to the gaudy spring . . ." 22 Cf. FI, 102. 23 The aphorism comes from Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, n66a, 31 (bk. 9, chap....
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Poems and Sonnets of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 2007 - 296 pages
...might never die, But as the riper should! by time decrease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st...fresh ornament, And only herald to the gaudy spring, II9 Within thine own bud buriest thy content, And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding, Pity the...
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