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" Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it refreshes. "
The lives of the most eminent English poets - Page 377
by Samuel Johnson, John Hawkins - 1787
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Johnson. Select works, ed. with intr. and notes by A. Milnes. Lives of ...

Samuel Johnson - 1879
...is no longer doubted the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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Johnson: His Characteristics and Aphorisms

James Hay - Johnson, Samuel, 1709-1784 - 1884 - 173 pages
...country, but may be cultivated and enjoyed where no other pleasure can be obtained. — Idler, No. 94. Learning once made popular is no longer learning : it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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Wit and Wisdom of Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson, George Birkbeck Norman Hill - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1888 - 323 pages
...is no longer doubted the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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A Dictionary of Quotations in Prose: From American and Foreign Authors ...

Anna Lydia Ward - Citations anglaises - 1889 - 701 pages
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten.' Learning, once made popular, is no longer learning: it has the appearance of sometiling which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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Treasury of Thought: Forming an Encyclopędia of Quotations from Ancient and ...

Maturin Murray Ballou - Quotations, English - 1894 - 579 pages
...souls of true virtue. — Milton. The most learned are often the most narrow minded men. — Jhfazlitt. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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English Prose: Selections : with Critical Introductions by Various ..., Volume 4

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1895
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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English Prose: Selections, Volume 4

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1895
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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Johnson's Life of Dryden [ed.] by P. Peterson

Samuel Johnson - 1899 - 185 pages
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the ...

Tryon Edwards - Quotations, English - 1908 - 644 pages
...ill-timed, misplaced, or improperly addressed, that he had much better hold his tongue. — Chesterfield. oney. If you approach them, they are not asleep ; if you seek them, they do something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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English Prose: Eighteenth century

Sir Henry Craik - English literature - 1911
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
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