Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it refreshes. "
The lives of the most eminent English poets - Page 377
by Samuel Johnson, John Hawkins - 1787
Full view - About this book

The Beauties of Johnson: Choice Selections from His Works

Samuel Johnson - 1853 - 160 pages
...which is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of "omething which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors

Tryon Edwards - Quotations, English - 1853 - 432 pages
...solitude, and gives moderation and wisdom in all circumstances. — Palmer. LEARNING, POPULAR. — Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

Lives of the most eminent English poets, with critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - 1854
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

Johnson's Lives of the British poets completed by W. Hazlitt, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1854
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1854
...longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the firsKeacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

Laconics, Or The Best Words of the Best Authors

Aphorisms and apothegms - 1856
...matter to work in, or objects to work upon ; but wit and wisdom are born with a man. — Selden. L. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

The Lives of the English Poets: cowley. Denham. Milton. Butler. Rochester ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1858
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning; it lias the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of John Dryden: Containing Original Poems, Tales, and ...

John Dryden - 1867 - 445 pages
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

The first (-third, fifth, sixth) reading book, by T. Crampton and ..., Volume 6

Thomas Crampton - 1868
...is no longer doubted, the evidence ceases to be examined. Of an art universally practised, the first teacher is forgotten. Learning once made popular is no longer learning ; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book

Wisdom and Genius of Dr. Samuel Johnson: Selected from His Prose Writings

Samuel Johnson, William Alexander Clouston - 1875 - 298 pages
...to cities or to country, but may be cultivated and enjoyed where no other pleasure can be obtained. Learning once made popular is no longer learning; it has the appearance of something which we have bestowed upon ourselves, as the dew appears to rise from the field which it...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF