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" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
The Every-day Book and Table Book: Or, Everlasting Calendar of Popular ... - Page 253
by William Hone - 1837
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English Literature of Nineteenth Century: On the Plan of the Author's ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1869 - 798 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain, — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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The public school speaker and reader, ed. by J.E. Carpenter

Joseph Edwards Carpenter - 1869
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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Keats

Andrew Motion - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 636 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever it seems rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. As Keats contemplates...
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Love Disconsoled: Meditations on Christian Charity

Timothy P. Jackson, Timothy Patrick Jackson - Philosophy - 1999 - 254 pages
...and nonbeing, natural beauty and physical death: Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! But thoughts of human suffering- "hungry generations," "the sad heart of Ruth," and "faery lands forlorn"...
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Reading The Eve of St.Agnes: The Multiples of Complex Literary Transaction

Jack Stillinger - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 200 pages
...death in the sixth stanza of Ode to a Nightingale: Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! The richness of this thought is immediately nullified by the realism of mortal extinction: "Still wouldst...
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The Unequal Hours: Moments of Being in the Natural World

Linda Underhill - Nature - 1999 - 145 pages
...not exaggerating when he wrote of the nightingale: Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, while thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! IN THE HEART OF THE WILD : \~J Of course, songbirds have not evolved for our benefit only, much as...
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Dear Juliette: Letters of May Sarton to Juliette Huxley

Juliette Huxley - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 400 pages
...like. The Berg must be bursting with confessions — cries for help — and all the symphonies of love, "while thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad in such an ecstasy." And here now is a glimmer of sun, timid and vanishing in snow clouds. Time for lunch — which is the...
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Now More Than Ever

Aldous Huxley, David Bradshaw, James Sexton - Drama - 2000 - 95 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy. Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. LIDGATE: I say,...
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The Masks of Keats: The Endeavour of a Poet

Thomas McFarland, Murray Professor of English Literature Emeritus Thomas McFarland - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 244 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod.~7 Keats's actual...
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Not One of Them in Place: Modern Poetry and Jewish American Identity

Norman Finkelstein - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 194 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. Here, death takes...
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