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" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
The Every-day Book and Table Book: Or, Everlasting Calendar of Popular ... - Page 253
by William Hone - 1837
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"Under Green Leaves.": A Book of Rural Poems

Richard Henry Stoddard - Outdoor life - 1865 - 96 pages
...upon the midnight, with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad, In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear...
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Beauties of Modern British Poetry: Systematically Arranged ...

David Grant - English poetry - 1865 - 416 pages
...upon the midnight with no pain, Whilst thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear...
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Spring-time with the poets, poetry selected and arranged by F. Martin

Frances Martin - English poetry - 1866
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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The Standard poetry book, selected from the best authors

Standard poetry book - 1866 - 274 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad, In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. VII. Thou wast...
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Penny readings in prose and verse, selected and ed. by J.E. Carpenter, Volume 5

Penny readings - 1866
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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Moxon's standard penny readings [ed. by T. Hood]., Volume 3

Moxon Edward and co
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ectasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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The Golden Treasury of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language

Francis Turner Palgrave - English poetry - 1867 - 332 pages
...many a time To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, In such an...
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A household book of English poetry, selected with notes by R.C. Trench

Richard Chenevix Trench (abp. of Dublin) - 1868
...rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, 55 To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. 60 Thou wast...
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Proceedings of the Liverpool Literary & Philosophical Society, Volume 22

Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool - 1868
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain To thy high requiem, become a sod." 178 From that...
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Proceedings, Volume 22

Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool - 1868
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain To thy high requiem, become a sod." From that new...
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