Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
The Every-day Book and Table Book: Or, Everlasting Calendar of Popular ... - Page 253
by William Hone - 1837
Full view - About this book

Imagination and Fancy: Or, Selections from the English Poets, Illustrative ...

Leigh Hunt - ENGLISH POETRY (SELECTIONS: EXTRACTS, ETC.) - 1845 - 255 pages
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
Full view - About this book

Imagination and fancy; or Selections from the English poets, with critical ...

Leigh Hunt - 1845
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul ahroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of John Keats: In Two Parts

John Keats - English poetry - 1846
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and l have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. MISCELLANEOUS...
Full view - About this book

The Poets and Poetry of England: In the Nineteenth Century

Rufus Wilmot Griswold - Authors, English - 1846 - 504 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath. Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an eestasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain, To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of John Keats, Page 1

John Keats - 1847 - 256 pages
...many a time To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. 7Thou wast not...
Full view - About this book

The Beauties of the British Poets: With a Few Introductory Observations...

George Croly - English poetry - 1849 - 395 pages
...rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon die midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still would'st thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
Full view - About this book

Beauties of the British Poets ...

George Croly - English poetry - 1850 - 395 pages
...upon rtie midnight witli no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such.au ecstasy ! Still would'st thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird ! No hungry generations trend thee down ; The voice I hour...
Full view - About this book

Recollections of a Literary Life: Or Books, Places and People

Mary Russell Mitford - Authors - 1851 - 558 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain,— To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
Full view - About this book

Recollections of a Literary Life: Or, Books, Places and People

Mary Russell Mitford - Authors - 1852 - 558 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...ears in vain, — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear...
Full view - About this book

Euthanasy: Or, Happy Talk Towards the End of Life

William Mountford - Death - 1852 - 511 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath: Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy. He died where there are more nightingales than there are here ; and we will hope he felt at the last...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF