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" The want* of human interest is always felt. Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again. None ever wished it longer than it is. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure. We read Milton for... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. - Page 173
by Samuel Johnson - 1820
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Milton's Paradise Lost ...

John Milton - 1895
...reading public in their heart of hearts is inclined to endorse Dr. Johnson's judgment, that Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down and forgets to take up again ; that none ever wished it longer than it is ; that its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure ;...
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Library of the World's Best Literature: A-Z

Charles Dudley Warner - Literature - 1902
...knowledge. But original deficiency cannot be supplied. The want of human interest is always felt. ( Paradise Lost * is one of the books which the reader admires...We read Milton for instruction, retire harassed and overbxirdened, and look elsewhere for recreation; we desert our master, and seek for companions. Another...
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The Life of Samuel Johnson

Robert Anderson - 1973 - 639 pages
...performed to Milton is weakened, by his pronouncing " Paradise Lost " " an object of forced admiration ; one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to tak« up again." In his derogatory estimate of lf Lycidas," that " surely no man could have fancied...
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The Thread of Connection: Aspects of Fate in the Novels of Jane Austen and ...

C. C. Barfoot - Austen, Jane - 1982 - 215 pages
...audience that has been invited to partake in his and their creation. Dr Johnson said that 'Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again'. Whatever the justice of this famous slight and its relevance to the true greatness of Milton's epic,10...
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Words that Taste Good

Bill Moore - Poetry - 1987 - 175 pages
...under him . . . (Sunk, you note, not sank.) And the great lexicographer: Paradise Lost is one of those books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure. . . . SAMUEL JOHNSON Talking about little children, on...
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The Student Body: The Winter Carnival At This Maine College Had It All ...

J. S. Borthwick - Fiction - 1991 - 293 pages
...at the back of the room, listened with half an ear, remembering Dr. Johnson's words that "Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires...up again. None ever wished it longer than it is." Even Professor Merlin-Smith seemed to be suffering from the reading, although the student's monotone...
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Landscape, Liberty and Authority: Poetry, Criticism and Politics from ...

Tim Fulford - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 251 pages
...aesthetic disabled conventional criticism and surpassed the interests of the common reader: 'Paradłe Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again' (p. 183). Here, allying himself with die common reader, Johnson gains critical revenge for the experience...
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Seeing Into the Life of Things: Essays on Literature and Religious Experience

John L. Mahoney - Literary Collections - 1998 - 364 pages
...Johnson's famous (or infamous) remarks about the reader's response to Paradise Lost. He calls it a book "the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to...longer than it is. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure."2 This seems a surprising conclusion, for Johnson's commentary on the poem begins with the...
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The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry

John Sitter - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 298 pages
...such as Lycidas, the Masque, and Paradise Lost ("The want of human interest is always felt. Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again ... Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure").46 Striking at Milton's role as the great national...
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Johnson, Writing, and Memory

Greg Clingham - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 222 pages
...apparently decisive observation seems to come: "The want of human interest is always felt. Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires...is. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure" (para. 252). Such criticism sounds final, but it is much modified when taken in context, representing...
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