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" The want* of human interest is always felt. Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again. None ever wished it longer than it is. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure. We read Milton for... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. - Page 173
by Samuel Johnson - 1820
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Coleridge's Notebooks: A Selection

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Literary Collections - 2002 - 264 pages
...(gratification^P.) 84-6. Colourful episodes from Paradise Lost. 87. Johnson actually wrote of Paradise Lost, 'None ever wished it longer than it is. Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure': Lives of the English Poets, ed. George Birkbeck Hill (3 vols.; Oxford, 1905), i. 183. STC quotes Johnson...
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The Major Works

John Milton - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 966 pages
...and classical models; but he also notes the strain that the epic imposes upon the reader: 'Parodiee Lost is one of the books which the reader admires...up again. None ever wished it longer than it is.' Developing an observation of Addison 's about Milton's style, 'our language sunk under him' (Spectalor...
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The Tyranny of Heaven: Milton's Rejection of God as King

Michael Bryson - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 208 pages
...Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets, Johnson describes Milton's epic as "one of those books which the reader admires and lays down, and forgets to take up again" (Samuel Johnson: The Oxford Authors, ed. Donald Greene [Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press,...
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Paradise Lost (Kastan Edition)

John Milton, David Scott Kastan - Poetry - 496 pages
...they have often been less so in their affection. Samuel Johnson's pungent observation that "Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires and lays down and forgets to take up again"4 has too often been borne out in experience. It is not a poem that sits comfortingly by the...
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Bodybuilding: Reforming Masculinities in British Art 1750-1810

Martin Myrone - Health & Fitness - 2005 - 384 pages
...in the margins of his copy of Samuel Johnson's Lives of the Poets,' where he found the opinion that 'we read Milton for instruction, retire harassed and...overburdened, and look elsewhere for recreation'." The poet's association with republicanism made him politically suspect, and Fuseli himself was sometimes...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - Reference - 2006 - 1067 pages
...always been combated, and always has prevailed. 37 The want of human interest is always felt. Paradise stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands,...lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitful Lives of the English Poets "Milton" (1779-1781) 38 [Of Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock:] New...
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Reading Genesis in the Long Eighteenth Century: From Milton to Mary Shelley

Ana M. Acosta - Religion - 2006 - 207 pages
...explains the durability of that most famous of epigrams in Johnson's Lives of the Poets, "Paradise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires...take up again. None ever wished it longer than it is."8 Yet if Milton's poem and the Eden it depicts are conceived only as a standard of plausible perfection,...
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Das eigene und das fremde Leben: biographische Identitätsentwürfe in der ...

Helga Schwalm - Autobiography - 2007 - 418 pages
...ästhetisches Vergnügen ungetrübt ist, denn "[t] he want of human interest is always feit. Pa.ra.dise Lost is one of the books which the reader admires...forgets to take up again. None ever wished it longer thanit is."156 Erhabenheit und ästhetisches Vergnügen kommen bei Johnson kaum zur Deckung,157 und...
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The Constitution of Literature: Literacy, Democracy, and Early English ...

Lee Morrissey - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 242 pages
...differences between them with regard to reading. For example, Johnson writes, regarding Paradise Lost, "Its perusal is a duty rather than a pleasure. We...and overburdened, and look elsewhere for recreation" (ibid., 183-84). On the one hand, we could say that Johnson is describing the difficulty of reading...
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