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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their ... - Page 141
by Samuel Johnson - 1854
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The Six Chief Lives from Johnson's Lives of the Poets: With Macaulay's Life ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1881 - 466 pages
...such as a College easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...This poem has yet a grosser fault With these trifling I fictions are mingled the most awful and_sacre.d, truths; such as/ ought never to be polluted with...
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Our Great Writers, Or, Popular Chapters on Some Leading Authors

Samuel Andrews (M.A.) - English literature - 1884 - 275 pages
...inherent improbability always forces dissatisfaction on the mind. . . . We hear how one god asks another, what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can...sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour.' . . . and so on ; finishing up with this final blow : ' Surely no man could have fancied that he read...
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The Six Chief Lives from Johnson's Lives of the Poets: With Macaulay's "Life ...

Samuel Johnson - Poets, English - 1886 - 463 pages
...such as a College easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how ne1ther god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer...
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Samuel Johnson

Leslie Stephen - Authors, English - 1887 - 195 pages
...judge of his skill in piping; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and neithei god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy...; he who thus praises will confer no honour." This is of course utterly outrageous, and yet much of it is undeniably true. To explain why, in spite of...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1892 - 139 pages
...such as a College easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or .less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another 20 god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no...
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The Life of Michelangelo Buonarroti: Based on Studies in the ..., Volume 2

John Addington Symonds - Artists - 1893
...emotion underlay these verses, it must be submitted that, in the words of Samuel Johnson about "Lycidas," "he who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour." This conviction will be enforced when we reflect that the thought upon which the madrigal above translated...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1893 - 139 pages
...knowledge, or less exercise iriv \ntion, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and uimt now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in pip'nrj; and how one god asks another 20 god what is become of Lycidas, anJtJwu^neither god can tell....
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Johnson's Life of Milton, with intr. and notes by F. Ryland

Samuel Johnson - 1894
...such as a College easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, 30 and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises...
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Studies of a Biographer, Volume 4

Sir Leslie Stephen - Authors, English - 1902
...nature, for there is no truth. . . . Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ;...
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English Men of Letters: Pope, by Leslie Stephen, 1900; Johnson by Leslie ...

1900
...imagery such as a college easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge or less exercise invention than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and neither god can tell. He who thus grieves...
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