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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their ... - Page 141
by Samuel Johnson - 1854
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Lives of the most eminent English poets, with critical ..., Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - 1854
...of tenderness can be excited by these lines ? 112 " We drove a field, and both together heard What time the grey fly winds her sultry horn, Battening...yet a grosser fault. With these trifling fictions gives vent to his grief by studying philosophical treatises on that affection of the mind. Marmontel...
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Johnson's Lives of the British poets completed by W. Hazlitt, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1854
...such as a college easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can. tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ;...
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An Account of the Life, Opinions, and Writings of John Milton: With an ...

Thomas Keightley - Poets, English - 1855 - 484 pages
...such as a college easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without a judge of his skill in piping, and how one god asks another god, What is become of Lycidas ? and how...
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The poetical works of John Milton

John Milton - 1855 - 748 pages
...Subordinate poets exercise no invention, when they tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping : but Milton dignifies and adorns tiicse common artificial incidents with unexpected touches of picturesque...
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The Lives of the English Poets: cowley. Denham. Milton. Butler. Rochester ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1858
...such as a.college easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he...
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The Cornhill Magazine

George Smith, William Makepeace Thackeray - England - 1869
...criticisms. When he says of Lyeidas, " Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lyeidas, and how neither god can tell," — modern critics, for the most part, can only...
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Evenings in Arcadia

John Dennis - Pastoral poetry, English - 1865 - 321 pages
...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He...yet a grosser fault. With these trifling fictions are mingled the most awful and sacred truths, such as ought never to be polluted with such irreverent...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton with a Life of the Author: Preliminary ...

John Milton, Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1865 - 688 pages
...Subordinate poets exercise no invention, when they tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping : but Milton dignifies and adorns these common artificial incidents with unexpected touches of picturesque...
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Milton's Samson agonistes and Lycidas, with notes etc., by J. Hunter

John Milton - 1870
...such as a college easily supplies. Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion,...his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves, will excite no sympathy...
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A Day by the Fire: And Other Papers, Hitherto Uncollected

Leigh Hunt - English essays - 1870 - 368 pages
...Subordinate poets exercise no invention when they tell how a shepherd has lost a companion, and must feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; but Milton dignifies and adorns these common artificial incidents with unexpected touches of picturesque...
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