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" Dis's waggon ! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty ; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath ; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus... "
Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth - Page 176
by William Hazlitt - 1859 - 229 pages
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Shakespeare's Reading

Robert S. Miola, Gerard Manley Hopkins Professor of English Robert S Miola, James S. MacKillop, Robert S.. Miola - Drama - 2000 - 186 pages
...frighted, thou letst fall From Dis's wagon! — daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets, dim,...ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength. (116-24) This evocative passage associates Perdita with Proserpina, the daughter of Ceres, stolen away...
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Four Late Plays

William Shakespeare - 1998 - 410 pages
...branches yet Your maidenheads growing: O Proserpina, For the flowers now, that frighted thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! Daffodils, That come before...strength, a malady Most incident to maids; bold oxlips and 100 no 4,4 THE WINTER S TALE The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds, The flower-de-luce being one!...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...frighted, thou let'st fall / From Dis's waggon! daffodils, /That come befare the swallow dares, and take /The winds of March with beauty; violets, dim,...malady / Most incident to maids); bold oxlips and /The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds, / Con mi temeridad característica, af1rmo que Perdita habla en...
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Shakespeare and Sexuality

Wells - Literary Collections - 2001 - 207 pages
...her own fears and tender feelings: O Proserpina, For the flower now that, frighted, thou let'st fell From Dis's waggon! - daffodils, That come before the...with beauty; violets, dim But sweeter than the lids ofJuno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses, That die unmarried ere they can behold Bright Phoebus...
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The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots

Joseph Twadell Shipley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 636 pages
...that frighted thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! daffodills, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,...the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath; pale primeroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength-a malady Most incident...
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The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies - Social Science - 2002 - 349 pages
...the virile, male, life-giving force beneficial to virgins, whom she compares with 'pale primeroses, / That die unmarried, ere they can behold / Bright Phoebus...his strength (a malady / Most incident to maids)' (IV.iv. 122-25). Of course, it was not always possible for an afflicted virgin to be married in haste,...
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Dig: Modern Australian Gardening

Meredith Kirton - Gardening - 2004 - 440 pages
...candelabra-like whorls. They like a moist, humus-rich soil and a dressing of lime. A spot under a deciduous ...pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can...his strength, — a malady Most incident to maids.. . . William Shakespeare tree is perfect for primulas: the winter sunshine promotes flowering and the...
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The Sources of Shakespeare's Plays

Kenneth Muir - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 319 pages
...other flowers not mentioned by Ovid: O Proserpina, For the flowers now that, frighted, thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon ! - daffodils, That come before...oxlips, and The crown-imperial; lilies of all kinds, The flow'r-de-luce being one. O, these I lack To make you garlands of, and my sweet friend To strew him...
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Shakespeare's Heroines

Anna Murphy Jameson - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 464 pages
...sentiment, which melts into the very heart: O Proserpina! For the flowers now, that, frighted, thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! daffodils That come before...malady Most incident to maids; bold oxlips, and The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds, The flower-de-luce being one! O, these I lack To make you garlands...
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Masculinity and Emotion in Early Modern English Literature

Jennifer C. Vaught - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 244 pages
...inclusion of the phrase, "crown imperial": O Proserpina, For the flowers now that, frighted, thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon! daffodils, That come before...malady Most incident to maids): bold oxlips and The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds, The flower-de-luce being one. O, these I lack. To make you garlands...
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