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" ... whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them... "
Independence for the Philippine Islands: Hearings Before the Committee on ... - Page 358
by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs - 1932 - 658 pages
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The True Republican: Containing the Inaugural Addresses, Together with the ...

Presidents - 1841 - 456 pages
...becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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Report of the Select Committee [on] the Memorial of the Democratic Members ...

Edmund Burke - 1841 - 1070 pages
...the governed) to alter or abolish their government wheneve%tl;eydeem it expedient, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. This declaration...
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The American Politician: Containing the Declaration of the Independence, the ...

M. Sears - Statesmen - 1842 - 552 pages
...becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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Addresses and Messages of the Presidents of the United States from ...

United States. President - Presidents - 1842 - 754 pages
...destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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The American Politician: Containing the Declaration of Independence, the ...

M. Sears - Statesmen, American - 1844 - 564 pages
...becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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Public Laws of the State of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations: As ...

Rhode Island - Law - 1844 - 594 pages
...destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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Annual Report and Proceedings, Volumes 14-18

Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society - African Americans - 1846
...to be Slaveholders or Slaves, it has become our right and duty not to alter, but to abolish it, and to institute a new Government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as shall seem most likely to secure a full equality of the blessings of Life, Liberty...
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A Pictorial History of the United States of America: From the Earliest ...

R. Thomas (A.M.) - United States - 1847 - 755 pages
...becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed,...
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History of the United States: From Their First Settlement as Colonies, to ...

Salma Hale - United States - 1848 - 382 pages
...ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it and to institute THE UNITED STATES. 221 a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." To justify the...
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The Right of the People to Establish Forms of Government: Mr. Hallett's ...

Benjamin Franklin Hallett - Constitutional history - 1848 - 71 pages
...becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." The Virginia...
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