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" The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what we feel , not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most: we that are young Shall never see so much , nor live so long. "
The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton, the illustr. by J ... - Page 116
by William Shakespeare - 1860
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 236 pages
...uncertainty: Kent. I have a journey, sir, shortly to go; My master calls me, I must not say no. Edgar. The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (v, iii, 321-6) There is no emphasis on the restoration of order and no expressed hope in the future....
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Speaking Shakespeare

Patsy Rodenburg - Acting - 2002 - 355 pages
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History of European Drama and Theatre

Erika Fischer-Lichte - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 396 pages
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History of European Drama and Theatre

Erika Fischer-Lichte - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 396 pages
...tragedy ends with Edgar's words - in another quarto given to Albany - which leave the future open: weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what we...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (V, 3, 322-5) The only certainty is that an epoch has come to an end and it is final. The ending of...
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Textual Shakespeare: Writing and the Word

Graham Holderness - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 311 pages
...romantic retirement. The closing lines of the play familiar to us from modern editions as Edgar's: The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long 10. - for a century and a half reappeared in a radically altered form, though still spoken (as in the...
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Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear and MacBeth

A. C. Bradley - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 512 pages
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Elizabethan Drama Part 1: Marlowe to Shakespeare: Part 46 Harvard Classics

Charles W. Eliot - Drama - 2004 - 448 pages
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Susan's Last Summer

Marilyn Schroeder - Fiction - 2005 - 132 pages
...glance around the room. I knew she could see only light and shadow. I read the last lines of King Lear. "The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...young Shall never see so much, nor live so long." I closed the book. The tears that ran down my cheeks were not for Lear. Susan reached to pat Pinon's...
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Shakespearean Criticism: Excerpts from the Criticism of William ..., Volume 83

1984
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