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" The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what we feel , not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most: we that are young Shall never see so much , nor live so long. "
The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton, the illustr. by J ... - Page 116
by William Shakespeare - 1860
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Hermeneutics Ancient and Modern

Gerald L. Bruns - Philosophy - 1992 - 318 pages
...tragic conflict, and so events must wait for them. Or, as the concluding lines of King Lear have it: The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (5.3.323-26) But as for tragedy, Caputo will have none of it: The tragic does not allow suffering its...
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Melville and the Politics of Identity: From King Lear to Moby-Dick

Julian Markels - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 164 pages
...become story. He has the last word, and he says only that it is time to speak what we really feel: The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (Viii.323-26) We ought to say that the gods are just and a divinity shapes our ends, but what those...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1994 - 176 pages
...sustain. 201 KENT I have a journey, sir, shortly to go: 320 My master calls me; I must not say no. EDGAR The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. 202 [Exeunt with a dead march. NOTES ON KING LEAR In these notes, the abbreviations used include the...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...undo this button. Thank you, sir. Do you see this? Look on her! Look her lips, Look there, look there The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. 65 The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come,...
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The Company of Knaves: A Philip Fletcher Mystery

Simon Shaw - Fiction - 1997 - 224 pages
...opinions had usually been right. He had possessed a fund of sense and had been good company personified. The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long. Philip stood alone in his living room, thinking lines of remembrance, while Verdi's Requiem issued...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...iii, 322-323) He anticipates joining Lear in death. Edgar then prepares to move the kingdom forward: The weight of this sad time we must obey. Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (V, iii, 324-327) Edgar seems to feel that Lear's life has taught others who will follow, and this...
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Shakespeare's Universal Wolf: Studies in Early Modern Reification

Hugh Grady, Professor of English Hugh Grady - Drama - 1996 - 241 pages
...such, it is fitting that he defines the last, after-the-deluge sombre mood with which the play ends:6 6 The weight of this sad time we must obey. Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. {v. iii. 324-7) We can detect in the first couplet a suggestion of a refusal to revert back to the...
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Lear from Study to Stage: Essays in Criticism

James Ogden, Arthur Hawley Scouten - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 305 pages
...the final speech by virtue of his position; in the Folio Edgar makes it by virtue of his character: The weight of this sad time we must obey: Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. In a good production, there will be the feeling that nobody quite knows what to say, but something...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...storm and a friend and kinsman of its victims, addresses the remaining English forces in King Lear: The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (v. iii. 325-8) Here, in accordance with the changed circumstances, explicit retelling - 'Speak what...
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In Small Proportions: A Poetics of the English Ayre, 1596-1622

Daniel Fischlin, Professor Department of English Daniel Fischlin - Music - 1998 - 404 pages
...Doughtie's note, 449-51. 59. This same subordination is at the core of the concluding lines of King Lear: "The weight of this sad time we must obey, / Speak...young / Shall never see so much, nor live so long" (5.3.324-28; The Riverside Shakespeare, 1295; emphasis added). 60. Doughtie, Lyrics, 312. 61. Ibid.,...
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