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" The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what we feel , not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most: we that are young Shall never see so much , nor live so long. "
The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton, the illustr. by J ... - Page 116
by William Shakespeare - 1860
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King Lear, ed. by C.E. Moberly

William Shakespeare - 1876
...KENT and EDGAR] Friends of my soul, you twain Rule in this realm, and the gored state sustain. 320 KENT. I have a journey, sir, shortly to go ; My master...much, nor live so long. [Exeunt, with a dead march. NOTES ACT I. SCENE i. 1 Had more affected = ' felt more affection for.' The verb is probably formed...
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare, Volumes 12-13

William Shakespeare - 1878
...realm, and the gored state sustain. Kent. I have a journey, sir, shortly to go ; My master calls, and I must not say, No. Alb. The weight of this sad time...young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long. IExeunt, witk a dead, march. That heaven's vault should crack. — O, she is gone for ever ! — I...
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The plays and poems of William Shakespeare, ed. by J.P. Collier, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1878
...hence. Our present business Is general woe.—Friends of my soul, you twain [To KENT and EDGAR. Rule in this realm, and the gor'd state sustain. Kent....No.* Alb. The weight of this sad time we must obey ; 4 My master calls me, l must not say A'o :] The second folio here adds Dies, as a stage-direction...
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The Complete Dramatic and Poetical Works of William Shakespeare ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1879 - 896 pages
...Is general woe. [To Kent and Edgar] Friends of my soul, you twain Rule in this realm, and the gored he town, Be sad, as we would make ye: think ye see...the general throng and sweat Of thousand friends; OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE. DRAMATIS PERSONS. Duke of Venice. Brabantio, a senator. Other Senators....
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King Lear, from Hudson's School Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1880 - 112 pages
..."min'd piece of nature." Is general woe. — [To KENT and EDO.] Friends of my soul, you twain Rule in this realm, and the gor'd State sustain. Kent....are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. ^ with a Dead MarcJi. GREEK TEXT-BOOKS, Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Revised and Enlarged Edition for 1879....
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Shakespeare's Tragedy of King Lear

William Shakespeare - 1880 - 267 pages
...sustain. Kent. I have a journey, sir, shortly to go ; My master calls me, I must not say no. Albany. The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. [JExeunt, with a dead march. STRATFORD PORTRA1T OF SHAKESPEARE. NOTES. ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THE NOTES....
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Shakespeare and the Triple Play: From Study to Stage to Classroom

Sidney Homan - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 239 pages
...associates himself, not with a new beginning, but with the tableau of the dead, both young and old: The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (5.3.323-26) His is an almost figure-less speech of bare monosyllables that leaves no place for ironic...
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Shakespeare's Dramatic Transactions

Michael Mooney - Drama - 1990 - 226 pages
...him for not guiding our response earlier, but in these lines he speaks yet again what we all feel:24 The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (324-327) 148 The new king's formal couplets and rhetoric do not disguise the intent of this speech...
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On Strangeness

Margaret Bridges - Combination (Linguistics) - 1990 - 239 pages
...foreground and ironically subvert the very nature of the conventional affirmation of continuity: Edgar. The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (V.iii.323-26)1 Unlike the survivors in most other tragedies, Edgar finds no words of eulogy for the...
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Reading Shakespeare in Performance: King Lear

James P. Lusardi, June Schlueter, Professor June Schlueter - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 245 pages
...comes from Edgar, with the final lines of the play, in a voice chastened by the weight of experience: The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (328-31) This concluding utterance seems a small concession and, surely, a perfunctory comment on the...
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