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from them, and this among the rest. No intimation is given, indeed, of such a custom among the Hebrews, prior to the date of their bondage, whence it appears certain that they copied the dance of triumph from the usages of the Egyptians. The reader will observe that Moses occupies a prominent situation in the centre of the picture.

The narrative, thus illustrated, is admirably calculated to impress the mind of the reader with holy awe at the wonder-working power of Jehovah. Nothing is too difficult for his mighty hand to accomplish. The ever restless waters confessed his presence, and for once their undulation ceased. What an extraordinary exhibition of the Divine power! The very wind which was employed on the occasion was in itself miraculous, for there is no such thing as a natural east wind in all this region. During one half of the year, the monsoon blows steadily from the north, and during the other half as steadily from the south. The stupendous nature of the miracle is seen in the effect it had upon the Hebrews themselves. The sacred historian says, that when they saw the "great work," they "feared and believed the Lord and his servant Moses." Nor was the effect of a momentary nature. In after ages, historians, prophets, poets, and didactic writers, refer more frequently and more emphatically to this miracle, than to any other recorded in the Old Testament. Their aspirations of praise are blended with the song of Moses and the chorus of Miriam. The burden of their rejoicings has been thus described by a modern poet :—

Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea!
Jehovah has triumphed! his people are free!
Sing!-for the pride of the tyrant is broken;

His chariots, his horsemen, all splendid and brave,

How vain was their boasting! the Lord hath but spoken,
And chariots and horsemen are sunk in the wave.
Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea!
Jehovah has triumphed! his people are free!

Praise to the Conqueror ! praise to the Lord!
His word was our arrow, his breath was our sword!
Who shall return to tell Egypt the story

Of those she sent forth in the hour of her pride?
For the Lord hath looked out from his pillar of glory,
And all her brave thousands are dash'd in the tide.
Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea!
Jehovah has triumphed! his people are free!

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THE HIGH-PRIEST AARON OFFERING INCENSE ON THE GOLDEN ALTAR.

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