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sitates the provision of five additional positions-one GS-9 court reporter, one GS-5 secretary, two GS-4 clerk-stenographers, and one GS-3 clerk-typist, at a cost of $16,100.

MANAGEMENT OFFICE

GENERAL STATEMENT OF R. M. YINGLING, CHIEF, MANAGEMENT OFFICE Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, the present emergency has caused additional requirements in the Office, Secretary of the Army, totaling 47 man-years and $163,137. These increases may be attributed to three primary factors:

(a) A growing complexity in problems facing the secretariat-i. e., the Offices of the Secretary, the Under Secretary, and the two Assistant Secretaries-particularly in the areas of logistics, procurement planning, and industrial mobilization, requiring policy guidance and determinations.

(6) An enlargement in the scope of responsibility of the Civilian Personnel Division as a result of an over-all increase in civilian personnel throughout the Army Establishment, the opening of new installations, and a decentralization of authority from the Civil Service Commission under emergency conditions.

(0) An enlargement of the areas serviced by a group of separate and common headquarters service activities; i. e., the Communications Division, the Procurement and Supply Division, the Departmental Personnel Operations Branch, and the Army library. Estimates for these activities are based on the anticipated increase in the population of the Department of Defense at the seat of government. With the exception of the Departmental Personnel Operations Branch, these activities operate on a cross-service basis with the other elements of the Department of Defense at the seat of government.

The additional requirements may be categorized as follows: (a) 11.5 man. years and $60,294 in the areas of policy determination, including civilian per sonnel policies and procedures; (b) 35.5 man-years and $102,843 in the areas of separate and common headquarters servicing.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ENGINEERS

The supplemental fiscal year 1951 estimate of $349,280 requested for personal services in the Office, Chief of Engineers, and necessitated by the Korean situation will provide an average employment of 80, based on 140 positions. This additional amount will provide minimum services to cope with expanding workloads in the major fields of military supply and procurement, military operations, repairs and utilities, real-estate functions, and related administrative activities.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE

STATEMENT OF COL. THOMAS F.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE

These estimates provide $2,384,725 for an additional average employment of 795 civilians in the Adjutant General's Office during fiscal year 1951.

The requirement for these additional employees is based entirely upon increased work-loads in critical areas experienced since June 23, 1950. Some of the increases considered are the following:

(a) A 51-percent increase in casualty messages received, resulting in a corresponding increase in workload.

(6) Overseas assignments of officers were increased 50 percent, and domestic assignments 25 percent.

(c) The volume of incoming mail handled concerning reserve officers increased 44 percent, while telephone calls and interviews increased 62 percent.

(a) The workload in connection with recall of Reserve officers to active duty increased 87 percent.

(e) Correspondence pertaining to appointments and promotions of Reserve officers increased 58 percent. In addition, correspondence concerning commissions in National Guard of the United States increased 79 percent.

(f) Workload in Radio Communications Center increased as follows: Review and dispatch of messages, 37 percent; and courier operations, 25 percent.

(9) Classification and distribution of all mail increased 19 percent, to an intake of over 142,750 pieces during the 1-week period ended July 14, 1950.

(h) Preparation of classified correspondence increased 27 percent, and indexing of classified documents increased 53 percent.

The above items represent only a portion of the major increases in workloads pertaining to operations of the Adjutant General's Office. Other areas are similarly affected; while still others are affected to a lesser degree, but require utilization of additional personenl to prevent the accumulation of backlog.

OFFICE OF THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL

GENERAL STATEMENT, OFFICE OF THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL Mr. Chairman, and members of the committee, an additional $55,307 for 17 employees for fiscal year 1951 will be required for departmental personal services for the Office of the Judge Advocate General to dispose of the estimated 35percent increase in workload due to the Korean situation, the expanded Army, and the third increment. The increased workload will be reflected in legal matters pertaining to contracts, procurement of Army supplies, industrial mobilization, personnel, claims, military justice, and other functions of the office.

The volume of duties relating to contracts, procurement of supplies, personnel, and claims already has become accelerated, and the requirement of 17 additional employees represents a minimum number to dispose of this increasing workload.

OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL

STATEMENT OF MAJ. GEN. HERMAN FELDMAN, THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL

The estimated personnel requirements for the Office of the Quartermaster General amount to 339 man-years with a total cost of $1,412,202. In addition thereto, it is estimated that this personnel will be paid an additional $36,000 for overtime.

In order to accomplish the increased supply mission occasioned by the expansion of the Army, it will be necessary to employ this additional personnel for the purpose of providing proper supervision, planning, and establishment of policy direction for the activities connected with the supply of subsistence, general supplies, clothing and equipage, and petroleum ; increased operational activities of the branch and general depots; acceleration of industrial mobilization planning; implementation of security and intelligence programs; increased laundry and maintenance activities; and the administrative, property, and fiscal accounting necessary in supporting these increased operations.

The total personnel required has been computed on the basis of an estimated workload derived from experience factors established by cost-accounting records and work-measurement data. Consideration has been given to the fact that workload occasioned by the expansion of forces will require the progressive employment of personnel through the fiscal year.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF TRANSPORTATION

STATEMENT IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE FISCAL YEAR 1951 FOR

SALARIES, OFFICE OF CHIEF OF TRANSPORTATION 1. The amount estimated in this supplemental request for the Office of the Chief of Transportation amounts to $340,648 and will provide for an increase of 88 man-years.

2. In connection with the Korean task force and augmentation of the Armed Forces there already is a large increase in the flow of matériel and personnel. It is the responsibility of the Office of the Chief of Transportation to insure that there will be no interruption in movements of troops and cargo. This requires control over routings, releases to ports, and requires close coordination between the OCOFT and common carriers. Also close coordination is required with the United States Air Forces and the Military Sea Transportation Service for the most efficient uitilization of transportation facilities. In addition, there is and will continue to be heavy demands for transportation planning. Most of the increased amount requested will be for the Military Planning and Intelligence Division, the Movements Control Division, the Commercial Land Traffic Service Division, the Terminal Operations and Installations Division, the Military Railway Service Division, and the Highway Transport Service Division.

69887–50-pt. 2-7

The other divisions are being held to a minimum, although indications are that the Supply Division, Training and Organization Division, and the Comptroller and Administrative Divisions will require additional personnel.

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL

The Provost Marshal General is requesting an increase in the 1951 fiscal year estimate of $16,926. This amount will provide for the pay of six additional civilian employees to lement the presently assigned civilian personnel.

Due to the Korean situation, the workload of this office in connection with planning, training, and operations has been increased by approximately 30 percent.

The Provost Marshal General is further charged with the operation of the American and Enemy Prisoner of War Information Bureaus as established by article 77 of the Geneva Convention of 1929. During normal times only two civilians are assigned to the American Prisoner of War Information Bureau but present indications are that it will become necessary in the immediate future to increase the staff of this Bureau to comply with the provisions of the aforementioned Geneva Convention.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ENGINEERS

SALARIES, OFFICE, CHIEF OF ENGINEERS

(Departmental) The supplemental fiscal year 1951 estimate of $349,280 requested for personal services in the Office, Chief of Engineers, and necessitated by the Korean situation will provide an average employment of 80, based on 140 positions. This additional amount will provide minimum services to cope with expanding workloads in the major fields of military supply and procurement; military operations; repairs and utilities; real estate functions; and related administrative activities.

OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER

STATEMENT OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER

1. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, the regular salaries, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, fiscal year 1951 estimates as reported to the Senate amounted to $2,455,821. In order to accomplish the additional workload in the Office of the Chief Signal Officer as a result of the Korean situation, it has been necessary to increase these estimates for fiscal year 1951 by $212,680. This increase is required to pay a total of 52 additional man-years.

2. The increase in personnel is required for the preparation of plans for the activation of new Signal Corps type T/0 and E units, scheduling of movement of units to Korea, preparation of procurement programs for major items required, preparations for plans to establish new training courses and augmenting current training courses to provide critical communication specialists, preparation of detailed plans for fixed communications required both in the United States and overseas, and preparation of flash and supplemental budget estimates and funding programs. In addition, increased personnel are required for processing requisitions received for major items of equipment, the acceleration of the development program, and the placing of the message center on a 7-day workweek basis. The total increase requested in man-years amonnts to only approximately 8 percent which is very small compared to the tremendous increase in workload.

3. The revised estimates for salaries, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, are $2,668,501.

OFFICE OF SURGEON GENERAL

STATEMENT OF MAJ. GEN. GEORGE E. ARMSTRONG, OFFICE OF SURGEON GENERAL

The Senate Appropriations Committee approved the sum of $2,475,873 for the pay of 689 man-years of civilian employees in the Office of the Surgeon General during the fiscal year 1951. Additional funds in the amount of $57,424 are required for an increased increment of 16 man-years due to the extra workload resulting from the increase in the strength of the Army.

The 16 man-years are required to process the additional workload of offices responsible for the procurement of military personnel, maintenance of personnel plans for complete mobilization, assignments and reassignments of military personnel on a world-wide basis, mail and record activities, messenger service, civilian defense planning, depot and procurement activities, and medical mobilization planning and operations.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ORDNANCE

STATEMENT OF COL. I. A. CRUMP, OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ORDNANCE The total amount included in this supplemental estimate for departmental salaries, Office, Chief of Ordnance, for the fiscal year 1951 is $909,244. The 1951 estimate as reported by the Senate included $4,137,696 for Ordnance departmental salaries and the revised estimate brings the total to $5,046,940.

This supplemental estimate for the fiscal year 1951 will provide for 196 additional man-years over and above the 906 man-years allowed by the Senate subcommittee.

This increase is directly attributable to the increased workload imposed upon the Ordnance Department due to the current international situation. The total revised estimate for fiscal year 1951 for the Ordnance Department Appropriation, "O. S. and S. A.” is over $2,000,000,000 as compared to approximately $647,000,000 in the original estimate. This insrease is primarily in the fields of major procurement and maintenance and operations. To effectively and efficiently direct and administer a program of the magnitude reflected in the revised supplemental estimates for the Ordnance Department, additional personnel for the Office, Chief of Ordnance, is urgently needed.

The full impact of the 1951 requirements cannot be obtained solely from an analysis of the project items comprising this enlarged budget. Cognizance must also be taken of the increased scope and tempo of activties and the operational requirements that demand a full and immediate implementation. The necessity for fulfilling the increased overseas ordnance requirements and maintainng adequate stores of supplies in this country in support of operational needs is obvious but at the same time the completeness and accuracy of these operations cannot be jeopardized because of the lack of personnel in the ordnance office to direct and plan these activties. The increase of 196 man-years requested is not an estimate but is based upon a thorough survey of actual requirements.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF CHEMICAL CORPS

STATEMENT OF BRIG. GEN. E. C. WALLINGTON, DEPUTY CHIEF, CHEMICAL CORPS

The funds requested in the supplemental estimate before you for salaries, Office of the Chief, Chemical Corps, provide for only 35 civilian employees over the number allowed by the Senate Committee on Appropriations for fiscal year 1951. There has been a tremendous increase in the workload in the Office of the Chief, Chemical Corps, during the last few weeks as a result of the task force operations in Korea. The greatest increase in the volume of work has been in the fields of troop requirements, procurement, supply, research and development, budget and fiscal, and training. The increase in the size of the Army has also increased the volume of work in the Military Personnel Records Unit.

As you gentlemen well know, we are operating the headquarters of the Chemical Corps with over 50 percent of our force located 70 miles away. This has been a tremendous handicap in the past few years and it has become even more serious during the last few weeks, in our efforts to determine Chemical Corps requirements needed to successfully carry out the Korean operations and get the supplies and equipment to the fighting forces. We are requesting additional personnel only in the Washington portion of the office.

CONTINGENT EXPENSES

WITNESS

SPENCER BURROUGHS, DIRECTOR OF PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY

Mr. Mahon. Contingent expenses, for expenses at the seat of government. Most of that money is to be used for printing and binding of additional training manuals which are required in connection with training the expanded Army.

Mr. BURROUGHS. Project 711 under this appropriation title provides funds for miscellaneous expenses of departmental activities of the Department of the Army. Project 712 represents fund requirements for the entire Army establishment for printing and reproduction services obtained from or through the Government Printing Office or the Defense Printing Service.

Total fund requirements under this appropriation heading were developed on the basis of projected plans and programs attributable to the Korean situation. More detailed information with respect to additional funds requested will be found in the justification now before you.

Mr. Mahon. Thank you Mr. Burroughs. We have already discussed this item to some length.

EXPEDITING PRODUCTION OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES

WITNESS

MAJ. GEN. JOHN K. CHRISTMAS, G4, GENERAL STAFF

On the last item, of $152,000,000, for expediting production of equipment and supplies, General Christmas, who is director of procurement, Department of the Army, is here; I would like to have him make a statement to the committee at this time.

GENERAL STATEMENT

Mr. Mahon. General Christmas, the committee will be glad to have a statement from you.

General CHRISTMAS. Mr. Chairman, I have a prepared statement covering the item, expediting of production of equipment and supplies.

1. Commencing in June 1940 and continuing through the major part of World War II, the Congress appropriated some $7,500,000,000 to the War Department under the appropriation expediting production equipment and supplies for national defense. Prior to Pearl Harbor all apportionment to the using services from this appropriation were made in person by the President with this authority being delegated on December 12, 1941, to the Under Secretary of War.

2. It should be noted that the above $7,500,000,000 included expediting funds for the Air Force and the Manhattan project, however, even with the deduction of these two items, the expediting funds for the Army were over $5,000,000,000.

3. World War II expediting funds were used for purchases of land, erection of facilities, procurement of installations and production

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