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or aiding in the disbursement, of public moneys of the United States available for expenditure by any agency of the Government.

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT

Sec. 4. Functions of postal disbursements.-All functions relating to the disbursement of the postal revenues and all other funds under the jurisdiction of the Post Office Department and the Postmaster General and the Board of Trustees of the Postal Savings System which would otherwise become functions of the Treasury Department on July 1, 1940, by virtue of Executive Order No. 6166 of June 10, 1933, as amended, are transferred to and vested in (a) the Board of Trustees of the Postal Savings System as to postal savings disbursements, and (b) the Post Office Department as to all other dis. bursements involved, and such functions shall be exercised by postmasters and other authorized disbursing agents of the Post Office Department and of the Postal Savings System in accordance with existing statutes pertaining to such functions: Provided, That the Postmaster General shall furnish to the Secretary of the Treasury, when requested by him, such information as the Treasury Department may require with respect to the amounts of money received and disbursed by the Post Office Department, its postmasters and other fiscal officers, and the procedure followed in connection therewith: Provided further, That upon request of the Secretary of the Treasury, and with the approval of the Postmaster General, the facilities of the Post Office Department may be utilized in the disbursement, or aiding in the disbursement, of public moneys of the United States available for expenditure by any agency of the Government.

Sec. 5. Transfer of interbuilding messenger functions.-(a) Except as prohibited by section 3 (b) of the Reorganization Act of 1939, the function of regular interbuilding messenger service (including the transportation of mail) and the function of transportation of mail between Government agencies and the city post office, now exercised in the District of Columbia by agencies of the Government, are transferred from such agencies to and consolidated in the Post Office Department and shall be administered by the Postmaster General under such rules and regulations as the President shall prescribe: Provided, That this section shall not apply to the transportation of moneys and securities by armored truck or by other special services, or to messenger service between contiguous buildings.

(b) The Director of the Bureau of the Budget may waive the transfer of any motor vehicle coming within the purview of section 14 of this plan where he finds that the retention of such vehicle is essential to the performance of functions other than those transferred by this section.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Sec. 6. Certain functions of the Soil Conservation Service transferred.-The functions of the Soil Conservation Service in the Department of Agriculture with respect to soil and moisture conservation operations conducted on any lands under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior are transferred to the Department of the Interior and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Secretary of the Interior through such agency or agencies in the Department of the Interior as the Secretary shall designate.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Sec. 7. Transfer of Civil Aeronautics Authority.-(a) The Civil Aeronautics Authority and its functions, the Office of the Administrator of Civil Aeronautics and its functions, and the functions of the Air Safety Board are transferred to the Department of Commerce.

(b) The functions of the Air Safety Board are consolidated with the functions of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, which shall hereafter be known as the Civil Aeronautics Board and which shall, in addition to its other functions, discharge the duties heretofore vested in the Air Safety Board so as to provide for the independent investigation of aircraft accidents. The offices of the members of the Air Safety Board are abolished.

(c) The Administrator of Civil Aeronautics, whose functions shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Secretary of Commerce, and the Civil Aeronautics Board, which shall report to Congress and the President through the Secretary of Commerce, shall constitute the Civil Aeronautics Authority within the Department of Commerce: Provided, That the Civil Aeronautics Board shall exercise its functions of rule-making (including the prescription of rules, regulations, and standards), adjudication, and investigation independently of the Secretary of Commerce: Provided further, That the budgeting, accounting, personnel, procurement, and related routine management functions of the Civil Aeronautics Board shall be performed under the direction and supervision of the Secretary of Commerce through such facilities as he shall designate or establish.

Sec. 8. Transfer of Weather Bureau.The Weather Bureau in the Department of Agriculture and its functions are transferred to the Department of Commerce and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Secretary of Commerce: Provided, That the Department of Agriculture may continue to make snow surveys and to conduct research concerning: (a) relationship between weather and crops, (b) long-range weather forecasting, and (c) relationships between weather and soil erosion.

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

SEO. 9. Transfer of certain functions relating to enforcement of wage payments on public construction. The functions of the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Interior under section 2 of the Act of June 13, 1934, entitled“An Act to effectuate the purpose of certain statutes concerning rates of pay for labor, by making it unlawful to prevent anyone from receiving the compensation contracted for thereunder, and for other purposes” (48 Stat. 948), are transferred to the Secretary of Labor and shall be administered by him or under his direction and supervision by such agency in the Department of Labor as the Secretary shall designate.

UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION Sec. 10. Transfer of nautical school functions.—The functions of the Secretary of the Navy with respect to furnishing, maintaining, and repairing vessels for the use of State marine or nautical schools and with respect to administering grants of funds for the support of such schools are transferred to and shall be administered by the United States Maritime Commission. Jurisdiction over vessels, apparel, charts, books, and instruments now loaned to State marine or nautical schools is transferred from the Secretary of the Navy to the United States Maritime Commission.

FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY

SEC. 11. Transfer of certain Interior Department institutions(a) Saint Elizabeths Hospital.-Saint Elizabeths Hospital in the Department of the Interior and its functions are transferred to the Federal Security Agency and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator. The annual report required to be submitted to the Congress by the superintendent of the Hospital shall be submitted through the Federal Security Administrator. The annual report required to be furnished to the Secretary of the Interior by the Board of Visitors shall be furnished to the Federal Security Administrator.

(b) Freedmen's Hospital.Freedmen's Hospital in the Department of the Interior and its functions are transferred to the Federal Security Agency and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator.

(c) Howard University. The functions of the Department of the Interior relating to the administration of Howard University are transferred to the Federal Security Agency and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator. The annual report required to be furnished to the Secretary of the Interior by the president and directors of the University shall be furnished to the Federal Security Administrator. The Office of Education shall continue to make its inspections of and reports on the affairs of Howard University in accordance with the provisions of existing law.

(d) Columbia Institution for the Deaf.-The functions of the Department of the Interior relating to the administration of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf are transferred to the Federal Security Agency and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator. The annual report required to be furnished to the Secretary of the Interior by the president and directors of the Institution shall be furnished to the Federal Security Administrator, and the annual report of the superintendent of the Institution to the Congress shall be submitted through the Federal Security Administrator.

(e) Federal Security Administrator.—The functions transferred by this section shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator through such officers or subdivisions of the Federal Security Agency as the Administrator shall designate.

Sec. 12. Transfer of Food and Drug Administration.-The Food and Drug Administration in the Department of Agriculture and its functions, except those functions relating to the administration of the Insecticide Act of 1910 and the Naval Stores Act, are transferred to the Federal Security Agency and shall be administered under the direction and supervision of the Federal Security Administrator. The Chief of the Food and Drug Administration shall hereafter be known as the Commissioner of Food and Drugs.

GENERAL PROVISIONS Sec. 13. Transfer of functions of heads of departments.—Except as otherwise provided in this Plan, the functions of the head of any department relating to the administration of any agency or function transferred from his department by this Plan are transferred to, and shall be exercised by, the head of the department or agency to which such transferred agency or function is transferred by this Plan.

Sec. 14. Transfer of records, property, and personnel.—Except as otherwise provided in this Plan, all records and property (including office equipment) of the several agencies, and all records and property used primarily in the administration of any functions transferred by this Plan, and all personnel used in the administration of such agencies and functions (including officers whose chief duties relate to such administration and whose offices are not abolished) are transferred to the respective agencies concerned, for use in the administration of the agencies and functions transferred by this Plan: Provided, That any personnel transferred to any agency by this section found by the head of such agency to be in excess of the personnel necessary for the administration of the functions transferred to his agency shall be retransferred under existing law to other posi. tions in the Government service, or separated from the service subject to the provisions of section 10 (a) of the Reorganization Act of 1939.

Sec. 15. Transfer of funds.—So much of the unexpended balances of appropriations, allocations, or other funds available for the use of any agency in the exercise of any function transferred by this Plan, or for the use of the head of any agency in the exercise of any function so transferred, as the Director of the Bureau of the Budget with the approval of the President shall determine, shall be transferred to the agency concerned for use in connection with the exercise of the function so transferred. In determining the amount to be transferred the Director of the Bureau of the Budget may include an amount to provide for the liquidation of obligations incurred against such appropriations, allocations, or other funds prior to the transfer: Provided, That the use of the unexpended balances of appropriations, allocations, or other funds transferred by this section shall be subject to the provisions of section 4 (d) (3) and section 9 of the Reorganization Act of 1939.

FOURTH PLAN ON GOVERNMENT REORGANIZATION

Message from

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

transmitting REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. IV WHICH PROVIDES FOR A NUMBER

OF INTERDEPARTMENTAL REORGANIZATIONS APRIL 11, 1940.-Referred to the Select Committee on Government Organization and

ordered to be printed To the Congress of the United States:

One year ago the Congress directed the President to investigate the organization of the Executive establishment and to submit plans for such transfers, consolidations, and abolitions of agencies as were found necessary and desirable.

Shortly thereafter I submitted Reorganization Plan No. I which improved the overall management of the Executive branch. This was followed by Reorganiza

tion Plan No. II which effected a better allocation of certain agencies and activities among departments. Although these two plans have been in effect less than a year, their benefits have already been gratifying. I have found the task of coordinating the work of the Executive branch less difficult. Many improve ments in service have occurred, and substantial economies have resulted.

Reorganization Plan No. III, recently submitted, is a third step which will improve intradepartmental management through internal adjustment in certain agencies.

I am now proposing a fourth reorganization plan which provides for a number of interdepartmental reorganizations. These changes are designed to increase efficiency in the administration of Government services by a more logical grouping of certain functions and by a further reduction in the number of independent agencies reporting directly to the Chief Executive.

Accordingly, I am transmitting herewith Reorganization Plan No. IV, which, after investigation, I have prepared in pursuance of section 4 of the Reorganization Act of 1939 (Public, No. 19, 76th Cong., 1st sess.), approved April 3, 1939; and I declare with respect to each reorganization made in this plan, that I have found such reorganization necessary to accomplish one or more of the purposes of section 1 (a) of the act :

1. To reduce expenditures ;
2. To increase efficiency;
3. To consolidate agencies according to major purposes ;

4. To reduce the number of agencies by consolidating those having similar functions and by abolishing such as may not be necessary;

5. To eliminate overlapping and duplication of effort.
The plan I now transmit I shall describe briefly as follows:

Department of State.The Dominican Customs Receivership is transferred to the Department of State from the Division of Territories and Island Possessions in the Department of the Interior. The State Department is the most appropriate agency to supervise this activity which involves relations with a foreign government.

Treasury Department.—The plan transfers to the Secretary of the Treasury the function of the Attorney General of approving out-of-court settlements technically termed compromises of cases arising under the Federal Alcohol Administration Act which have not, prior to compromise, been referred to the Department of Justice for prosecution. The present requirement that the Attorney General approve all compromises results in a cumbersome, time-consuming procedure which the small amounts involved do not warrant. The proposed bandling will be simpler, less likely to cause delay, and consistent with the procedure now followed in compromises arising under other acts which the Treasury Department administers.

Department of Justice.-Executive Order No. 6166, issued June 10, 1933, provided for the centralization of the disbursement function in a Division of Dis. bursement in the Treasury Department. The resulting increase in efficiency has amply demonstrated the wisdom of centralizing disbursement work. In effectuating the plan, however, I have found it necessary to postpone its application to United States marshals because of the unusual character of their disbursing work in serving the courts. Experience indicates that this arrangement should be continued. I am proposing, therefore, the permanent transfer of the disbursement function of United States marshals from the Treasury Department to the Department of Justice.

Post Office Department.-It has also been found desirable to continue permanently in the Post Office Department the disbursement of Post Office funds, The special character of the work of this Department, involving disbursements in thousands of post offices throughout the Nation, requires here, as well as in the case of the United States marshals, a departure from the sound theory of central disbursing. With its far-flung facilities, the Post Office Department is better equipped to carry on this work than the Division of Disbursement.

Another proposal affecting the Post Office Department relates to the transportation of mail and other material between departments. In the early colonial days, the interchange of correspondence and messages was by the simple handto-hand method. Gradually a more systematic device became necessary to transport messages, with the resultant evolution of the postal service. Business and private citizens in general have made use of that service, and today we have in our Post Office Department the most efficient organization of its kind in the world. However, here in the Capital City, the Federal Government, instead of

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