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district court of the United States having cognizance of the offense, who shall fully apprize the juvenile of his rights and of the consequences of such consent. (June 16, 1938, sec. 2, 52 Stat. 765; 18 Ů. S. C., sec. 922.)

1312-3. Jurisdiction; waiver of trial. The district court of the United States having jurisdiction of the offense shall have jurisdiction to try persons prosecuted as juvenile delinquents. For such purposes the court may be convened at any time and place within the district, in chambers or otherwise. The trial shall be without a jury. The consent on the part of the juvenile to be prosecuted on a charge of juvenile delinquency shall be deemed a waiver of a trial by jury. (June 16, 1938, sec. 3, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U.S. C., sec. 923.)

1312-4. Probation; commitment to custody of Attorney General; support.-In the event that the court finds such juvenile guilty of juvenile delinquency, it may place him on probation under the provisions of the Act of March 4, 1925, as amended (43 Stat. 1259; U. S.C., title 18, secs. 724 to 728), except that the period of probation may include but may not exceed the minority of the delinquent; or it may commit the delinquent to the custody of the Attorney General for a period not exceeding his minority, but in no event exceeding the term for which the juvenile could have been sentenced if he had been tried and convicted of the offense which he had committed. The Attorney General may designate any public or private agency for the custody, care, subsistence, education, and training of the juvenile during the period for which he was committed. The cost of such custody and care may be paid from the appropriation for “Support of United States prisoners” or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate. (June 16, 1938, sec. 4, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U. S. C., sec. 924.)

1312-5. Notice of arrest; detention; bail.—Whenever a juvenile is arrested on a charge of having committed an offense against the laws of the United States, the arresting officer shall immediately notify the Attorney General of such fact. If such juvenile is not forthwith taken before a committing magistrate, he may be detained in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for such purposes, but shall not be detained in a jail or similar place of detention, unless, in the opinion of the arresting officer, such detention is necessary to secure the custody of such juvenile, or to insure his safety or that of others. In no case shall such detention be for a longer period than is necessary to produce such juvenile before a committing magistrate. The committing magistrate may release such juvenile on bail, upon his own l'ecognizance or that of some responsible person, or in default of bail may commit him to the custody of the United States marshal, who shall lodge him in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for that purpose. Such juvenile shall not be committed to a jail cr other similar institution, unless in the opinion of the marshal it appears that such commitment is necessary to secure the custody of the juvenile or to insure his safety or that of others. A juvenile detained in a jail or similar institution shall be held in custody in a room or other place apart from adults if facilities for such segregation are available. (June 16, 1938, sec. 5, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U. S. C., sec. 925.)

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CUSTOMS DUTIES

TARIFF ACT OF 1930

1315a. Animals imported for breeding purposes; stocking and noncommercial purposes; plants, etc., by Government. That on and after the day following the passage of this Act (June 18, 1930), except as otherwise specially provided for in this Act, the articles mentioned in the following paragraphs, when imported into the United States or into any of its possessions (except the Philippine Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Wake Island, Midway Islands, Kingman Reef, and the island of Guam), shall be exempt from duty: (June 17, 1930, Title II, sec. 201, 46 Stat. 672; June 25, 1938, sec. 2, 52 Stat. 1077; 19 U.S. C., sec. 1201.)

1319–1. Importation of cattle, sheep, swine, and meats prohibited in certain cases.-(a) Rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease. -If the Secretary of Agriculture determines that rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists in any foreign country, he shall officially notify the Secretary of the Treasury and give public notice thereof, and thereafter, and until the Secretary of Agriculture gives notice in a similar manner that such disease no longer exists in such foreign country, the importation into the United States of cattle, sheep, or other domestic ruminants, or swine, or of fresh, chilled, or frozen beef, veal, mutton, lamb, or pork, from such foreign country, is prohibited.

(b) Meats unfit for human food.—No meat of any kind shall be imported into the United States unless such meat is healthful, wholesome, and fit for human food and contains no dye, chemical, preservative, or ingredient which renders such meat unhealthful, unwholesome, or unfit for human food, and unless such meat also complies with the rules and regulations made by the Secretary of Agriculture. All imported meats shall, after entry into the United States in compliance with such rules and regulations, be deemed and treated as domestic meats within the meaning of and subject to the provisions of the Act of June 30, 1906 (Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, p. 674), commonly called the “Meat Inspection Amendment,” and the Act of June 30, 1906 (Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, p. 868), commonly called the "Food and Drugs Act,"

p and Acts amendatory of, supplementary to, or in substitution for such Acts.

(c) Regulations.—The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to make rules and regulations to carry out the purposes of this section and in such rules and regulations the Secretary of Agriculture may prescribe the terms and conditions for the destruction of all cattle, sheep, and other domestic ruminants, and swine, and of all meats, offered for entry and refused admission into the United States, unless such cattle, sheep, domestic ruminants, swine, or meats be exported by the consignee within the time fixed therefor in such rules and regulations. (June 17, 1930, Title III, sec. 306, 46 Stat. 689; 19 U. S. C., sec. 1306.)

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EDUCATION

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

1320. Federal board; members; chairman; terms of office; cooperation with State boards; investigations; assistants.—[Office of Education and its functions and personnel were transferred to Federal Security Agency, and functions of Secretary of Interior relating thereto were transferred to Administrator of said Agency by Reorganization Plan No. 1, sec. 201 and sec. 204, effective July 1, 1939, set out in paragraph 115–31 of this volume.] (Feb. 23, 1917, sec. 6, 39 Stat. 932; 20 U.S. C., sec. 17 note.)

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION (AND NATIONAL MUSEUM)

1322–1. Donations of works of art from Government agencies.—The Director of Procurement, the Administrator of the Public Works Administration, and other agencies of the Government are authorized to donate to the Gallery any works of art now or hereafter under their control. (May 17, 1938, sec. 5, 52 Stat. 401; 20 U. S. C., sec. 76d.)

VENDING STANDS FOR BLIND IN FEDERAL BUILDINGS

1324-1. Operation of vending stands authorized.—That for the purpose of providing blind persons with remunerative employment, enlarging the economic opportunities of the blind, and stimulating the blind to greater efforts in striving to make themselves self-supporting blind persons licensed under the provisions of this Act shall be authorized to operate vending stands in any Federal building where, in the discretion of the head of the department or agency in charge of the maintenance of the building, such vending stands may be properly and satisfactorily operated by blind persons. (June 20, 1936, sec. i, 49 Stat. 1559; 20 U. Š. C., sec. 107.)

1324–2. Surveys and reports to be made by Office of Education.-(a) The Office of Education in the Department of the Interior, subject to the direction of the Commissioner of Education and such rules and regulations as he may, with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, prescribe, shall

(1) Make surveys of concession-stand opportunities for blind persons in Federal and other buildings in the United States;

(2) Make surveys throughout the United States of indústries with a view to obtaining information that will assist blind persons to obtain employment;

(3) Make available to the public, and especially to persons and organizations engaged in work for the blind, information obtained as a result of such surveys;

(4) Designate as provided in section 3 of this Act the State commission for the blind in each State, or, in any State in which there is no such commission some other public agency to issue

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licenses to blind persons who are citizens of the United States and at least twenty-one years of age for the operating of vending stands in Federal and other buildings in such State for the vending of newspapers, periodicals, confections, tobacco products, and such other articles as may be approved for each building by the custodian thereof and the State licensing agency; and

(5) Take such other steps as may be necessary and proper to carry out the provisions of this Act. (b) The State licensing agency shall, in issuing each such license for the operation of a vending stand, give preference to blind persons who are in need of employment and have resided for at least one year in the State in which such stand is to be located. Each such license shall be issued for an indefinite period but may be terminated by the State licensing agency if it is satisfied that the stand is not being operated in accordance with the rues and reguations prescribed by such licensing agency. Each such license for the operation of a vending stand in a Federal building shall be subject to the approval of the Federal agency having charge of the building in which the stand is located. Such licenses shall be issued only to applicants who are blind within the meaning of this Act but are able, in spite of such infirmity, to operate such stands.

(c) The State licensing agency designated by the Office of Education is authorized, with the approval of the custodian having charge of the building in which the vending stand is to be located, to select a location for such stand and the type of stand to be provided. (June 20, 1936, sec. 2, 49 Stat. 1559; 20 U.S.C., sec. 107a.)

1324–3. Cooperation of State commission for blind.-(a) A State commission for the blind or other State agency desiring to be designated as the agency for licensing blind persons for the operation of vending stands as provided in this Act shall, with the approval of the governor of the State, make application to the Commissioner of Education and agree

(1) To cooperate with the Commissioner of Education and with the division of vocational rehabilitation of such State in training, placing, and supervising blind persons;

(2) To provide through loan, gift, or otherwise, for each blind person licensed to operate a stand, an adequate initial stock of suitable articles to be vended therefrom. (June 20, 1936, sec. 3,

49 Stat. 1560; 20 U.S. C., sec. 107b.) 1324 4. Cooperation of Commissioner with State boards. The Commis. sioner is authorized to cooperate with the State boards for rehabilitation of handicapped persons, established by the several States pursuant to the Act entitled "An Act to provide for the promotion of vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry or otherwise and their return to civil employment", approved June 2, 1920, as amended and supplemented, in carrying out the provisions of this Act. (June 20, 1936, sec. 4, 49 Stat. 1560; 20 U.S. C., sec. 107c.)

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1324–5. Expenditures authorized; preference for blind persons.-(a) The Commissioner is authorized to make such expenditures out of any money appropriated therefor (including expenditures for personal services and rent at the seat of government and elsewhere, books of reference and periodicals, for printing and binding, and for traveling expenses) as he may deem necessary to carry out the provisions of this Act.

(b) The Commissioner shall, in employing such additional personnel as may be necessary, give preference to blind persons who are capable of discharging the required duties, and at least 50 per centum of such additional personnel shall be blind persons. (June 20, 1936, sec. 5, 49 Stat. 1560; 20 U. S. C., sec. 107d.)

1324–6. Definitions.-As used in this Act.

(a) The term “United States” includes the several States, Territories, and possessions of the United States, and the District of Columbia.

(b) The term "blind person” means a person having not more than 10 per centum visual acuity in the better eye with correction. Such blindness shall be certified by a duly licensed ophthalmologist.

(c) The term "State” means a State, Territory, possession, or the District of Columbia. (June 20, 1936, sec. 6, 49 Stat. 1560; 20 Ú. S. C., sec. 107e.)

1324–7. Appropriation authorized. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for carrying out the provisions of this Act. (June 20, 1936, sec. 7,49 Stat. 1560; 20 U.S.C., sec. 107f.)

FOREIGN STUDENTS

1343–1. President authorized to permit citizens of American Republics to enroll in Government schools. That the President be, and he hereby is, authorized, in his discretion and under such regulations as he may prescribe by Executive order, to permit citizens of the American republics to receive instruction, with or without charge therefor, at professional educational institutions and schools maintained and administered by the Government of the United States or by departments or agencies thereof: Provided, That such citizens shall agree to comply with all regulations for the government of the institutions and schools at which they may be under instruction and to exert every effort to accomplish successfully the courses of instruction prescribed: And provided further, That the regulations prescribed by the President under the authority of this Act shall contain provisions limiting the admission of citizens of the American republics to primary schools maintained and administered by the Government of the United States so that there will under no circumstances be any curtailment of the admission of citizens of the United States eligible to receive instruction therein and not more than one citizen of any American republic shall receive instruction at the same time in the United States Military Academy and not more than one in the United States Naval Academy. (June 24, 1938, 52 Stat. 1034; 20 U. S. C., sec. 221.)

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