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EVENING.

We will take a ride through the park; and be put down at the foot of the hill: from the top of it, we may see the sun set. The day has been clear, bright, and hot. It is now near the end of June. The hill is steep, but we shall soon gain its brow. Now look at the sun; he seems the size of one of our large globes at home; but he is like a ball of fire. It is a grand sight! Now he has sunk from our view.

Look up! what a flock of kites there is in the air. I mean those which you see the boys now fly. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. I count ten, or more, all up at one time. There are two, whose strings have got mixt; they pitch, and down they come! How fine a view we have all round us ! On one side woods; and there, the great town, with its tall spires, its domes, and high roofs : and far off, are seen the blue hills.

NIGHT.

It is time to go to bed. Lay by your books, and, maps, and all your gay toys, dolls, bats, and balls, till you

in, to play with. Now read a Psalm from the Bible, verse by verse, in turns. Then kneel down and say your prayers : and first, say the Lord's Prayer. It is weit. Good night! Let me kiss each of you.

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Good night! good night! Be up in time to learn a verse or two out of your Task Book, and I will hear

you say it, the first thing when I come down from my room.—They are all in good health, thank God! and I trust they will rise the same.

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A Dog lay down in the stall, while the Ox was at work in the fields; but when he came in to feed at the crib, the Dog kept him off, and would not let -him touch the hay that was brought for him. Vile cur! said the Ox, you do not eat the hay yourself, nor will you let me have it who so much need it.

THE BOY AND THE WOLF.

MORAL:-A LIAR IS NOT TO BE BELIEVED.

A Boy who kept Sheep on a hill, cried out in sport, “ The Wolf, the Wolf !” by which means he drew some men from their work, who were in a field near, to come and help him; as they thought the Wolf was there : but the Boy laughed at them for their pains. The men then said, he should make a jest of them no more. At length the Wolf did come, and the Boy made the place ring with his cries for help; but the men now took no heed of him, so that some of the Sheep were torn by the Wolf, ere aid could be had.

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

MORAL:—WE ARE APT TO MAKE LIGHT OF WHAT WE CAN'T GET.

get at them.

A Fox saw some fine grapes, that he would have been glad to reach, but the frame to which the vine was hung, was so high, that he knew not how to

He leapt, and leapt, till he was quite spent, and strove all he could, but in vain. At last, when he found, that with all his arts, he could not reach them.-Pshaw! said he; they are but sour things; and I will try no more for such trash.

THE WOLF AND THE KID.

MORAL :- OBEY YOUR PARENTS.

The Goat, when she went forth to feed, shut up her young kid at home, and told him to bolt the door fast, and let no one in, till she should come back. The Wolf, who lay hid just by, heard the charge. He then gave a slight tap at the door, and, in the voice of the goat, told the kid to let him in. The kid saw him through a hole in the roof, and as he found out the cheat, bid him be gone; for though he could so well feign the Goat's voice, he had too much the look of a Wolf to be let in.

THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS.

MORAL:-THOSE YOU TREAT HARSHLY WILL NOT LOVE YOU.

An old Man, who made his poor Ass work hard for his keep, heard, all at once, that the foe was at hand. He ran to the Ass, and told him to make off with him as fast as he could.

Pray, said the Ass, do you think the foe will put a load on my back as you have done ? Ay, ay! said the old Man ; to be sure he will. Oh! then, said the Ass, what is it to me whom I serve, since I must still work all my life, as hard as I have done with you.

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