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Identification code 07-10-1705-0-1-051

Personnel Summary

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1964 actual

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35 11,853

41 12,349

46,882

48,876

43,628 54,692

5,420

3,473

219,609

237,552

668

668

220,278

NATIONAL BOard for the PROMOTION OF RIFLE PRACTICE, ARMY

For the necessary expenses of construction, equipment, and maintenance of rifle ranges, the instruction of citizens in marksmanship, and promotion of rifle practice, in accordance with law, including travel of rifle teams, military personnel, and individuals attending regional, national, and international competitions, and not to exceed $21,000 for incidental expenses of the National Board; [$484,000] $459,000: Provided, That travel expenses of civilian members of the National Board shall be paid in accordance with the Standardized Government Travel Regulations, as amended. (10 U.S.C. 4307-13, 4652; 32 U.S.C. 316; Department of Defense Appropriation Act, 1965.) Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

1964 actual

506

1965 estimate

22

15,800 16,100 16,500 15,155 15,555 15,969 $6,778 $6,950 $6,921

528

1,140

60

1,200

238,752

506

62

-58 -12 498

471

13

1966 estimate

1965 1966 estimate estimate

484

41 14,979

55.164

43,513

3,375

238,000

471

58 -59

800

42

842

238,842

470

459

459

459 59 -58

460

The National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice, in conjunction with the Office of Director of Civilian Marksmanship, continues to promote civilian interest in

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CLAIMS, DEFENSE

For payment, not otherwise provided for, of claims provided in appropriations for civil functions admini Department of the Army) as] authorized by [law;] by the Department of Defense (except for civil functio claims for damages arising under training contracts wi carriers and repayment of amounts determined by [of the Army, the Secretary of the Navy, or the Se Air Force] concerned, or officers designated by th have been erroneously collected from military and civil of the [Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air F ment of Defense, or from States, territories, or th Columbia, or members of National Guard units thereof and, in addition, not to exceed $6,000,000 to be available, and to remain available during fiscal yea derived by transfer from such appropriations ava Department of Defense during the fiscal year 196 determined by the Secretary of Defense], such am hereafter be necessary. (78 Stat. 470; Department of D

priation Act, 1965.)

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Identification code 07-10-0101-0-1-051

1964 1965 1966 actual estimate estimate

Program by activities:

10 Emergency and extraordinary expenses (obligations) (object class 91.0: unvouchered).

9,339 9,295 325

34

18,993

18.999

6

9-171

-6

19,000

19,000

18,999 -6

18,993

2,654 -1,105 -1,121

19,421

11,923 10,155

16,536
480

13,309
480

61

56

24,000

29,000

6

10,441

15

29.015

-15

29,000

23,000

6,000

29,015 -15

29,000

1,105 -1,405

This appropriation provides for the payment of all noncontractual claims against the Department of Defense as authorized by law.

Object Classification (in thousands of dollars)

24,000

24,000

15 18,999 29,015

24,000

24,000

28,700 24,000

1964 1965 1966 actual estimate estimate

24,000 1,405 -1.405

18,993 29,000 24,000

15,000

CONTINGENCIES, Defense

For emergencies and extraordinary expenses arising in the Department of Defense, to be expended on the approval or authority of the Secretary of Defense and such expenses may be accounted for solely on his certificate that the expenditures were necessary for confidential military purposes; $15,000,000: Provided, That a report of disbursements under this item of appropriation shall be made quarterly to the Appropriations Committees of the Congress. (78 Stat. 470; Department of Defense Appropriation Act, 1965.)

Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

24,000

1964

1965 1966 actual estimate estimate

15,000

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The United States Court of Military Appeals serves as the court of last resort for all of the more serious courtmartial convictions of military personnel. The number of cases docketed in 1964 totaled 868. An increase to 1,000 is anticipated in 1965 and 1966. The court released 104 opinions in 1964 and expects to publish a similar number during 1965 and 1966.

In compliance with the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the court is maintaining a current docket with the review completed, as of November 1, 1964, in 18,326 cases out of 18,424 cases filed since the court's establishment in 1951-leaving a balance of 98 under review.

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1964 actual

8. Other support equipment..........

9. Ammunition....

10. Production-base support. -

Total direct...

Federal Aviation Agency: "Operations.",

Atomic Energy Commission: "Plant and capital equipment."

United States Information Agency:

"Salaries and expenses."

"Acquisition and construction of radio facilities."

Reimbursable:

1. Aircraft..

2. Aircraft spares and repair parts.. 3. Missiles....

8

34

479

4. Missile spares and repair parts.

5. Weapons and combat vehicles..

6. Tactical and support vehicles.

439

202

1,162

ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED FROM OTHER ACCOUNTS

Note. Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are shown

in the schedules of the parent appropriations, as follows:

Funds appropriated to the President:

1965 estimate

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PROCUREMENT

The procurement appropriations of the Department of Defense finance the acquisition of capital equipment, such as aircraft, missiles, ships, combat vehicles, weapons, munitions, and communications; major items for support

116

1966 estimate

450,987
81,500

393,286

13,121

of the capital equipment when it is in use; the industrial facilities necessary to produce that equipment; and major modification of equipment in inventory where modernization can be achieved without buying new equipment. The capital equipment financed by these appropriations is principally procured from private contractors or produced in Government arsenals, shipyards, and plants.

The equipment inventories necessary to support the strategic and conventional warfare missions of the armed services will continue to be augmented and modernized. The 1966 program continues production of modern equipment and weapons in support of basic military missions. The improving military capability to cope with war threats of any kind anywhere is supported by continuing programs to increase the mobility and firepower of ground forces, strengthen the support capabilities of the tactical air forces, modernize airlift forces, and augment the capabilities of antisubmarine warfare forces. Direct budget programs are estimated as follows (in millions of dollars):

Aircraft.
Missiles

338,659

324,501

436, 163

185,236

340.343

71,294

2,635,090

Ships
Other

PROCUREMENT OF EQUIPMENT AND MISSILES, Army

For expenses necessary for the procurement, manufacture, and modification of missiles, armament, ammunition, equipment, vehicles, vessels, and aircraft for the Army and the Reserve Officers' Training Corps; purchase of not to exceed [three] two thousand [five] seven hundred and [seventy-four] forty-one passenger motor vehicles for replacement only; expenses which in the discretion of the Secretary of the Army are necessary in providing facilities for production of equipment and supplies for national defense purposes, including construction, and the furnishing of Government-owned facilities and equipment at privately owned plants; and ammunition for military salutes at institutions to which issue of weapons for salutes is authorized; [$1,656,396,000] $1,223,100,000, to remain available until expended. (5 U.S.C. 78; 10 U.S.C. 2353, 3012, 4386, 4531, 4532, 4683; Department of Defense Appropriation Act, 1965; additional authorizing legislation to be proposed for $598,200,000. Program and Financing (in thousands of dollars)

Budget plan
(amounts for procurement actions programed)

966

193,896

5,000

65,116

89,790

Total.....

General and special funds:

1964 actual 1965 estimate 1966 estimate

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1964 actual
6, 172

3,567

2,088

4,004

15,831

93,400

3,000

296,200

7,400

51,600

97,500

1964 actual

421,648
65,137

388,532

6,204

312,649

306,045

300,140

146,108

297,014

68,282

2,311,759

8,400

145,900

5,000 79,300

36,000

1965 estimate 1966 estimate 6, 241 6,367 2,518

1,806

1,785

1,906

3,482

3,838

14,026

13,917

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This appropriation provides major items of combat and support equipment for approved Army forces in perform-gramed ing their assigned mission to meet successfully both atomic and conventional war requirements. It also provides for the procurement of selected components of major items, as well as production engineering, tooling, and facilities in support of current procurement.

In 1966, the Army's direct budget plan totals $2,036 million, as compared to $1,875 million and $2,635 million for 1965 and 1964 respectively. As in previous years, this plan will be financed from new appropriations, unpro

-225,997
-138,893

-489,000

-628,807 -100,000

1,223,100

1,223,100

1964 actual

1965 estimate
2,454, 159

28,300

20,500

201,500

524,900

2,836,659

899, 249 1,045, 090 2,600,000

-934,112
-38,821

-219,761

-209,859 -225,997 -196,463 -184,700 -138,893 -296,500 -319,200 -489,000

-2,609

Obligations

1,145,090

899,249
628,807

612,811

1,223,100 2,906,294 1,656,396 1,223,100

2,836,659
-715,333

1965 estimate 1966 estimate

1, 145, 090
726, 443
2,836,659

2,590,000

1 Reimbursements from non-Federal sources are principally the dollar value of Mutual Security Military sales to friendly foreign nations (5 U.S.C. 172d-1).

45,000

45,000

30,000

20,000

232,000

140,000

700,000

730,000

2,600,000 2,590,000

1966 estimate
2,805, 797
1,015, 046
799, 249

-1,145,090

-612,811

2,931,094

-18,300
-6,500

2,906,294 1,656,396

1,656,396

-899,249 -628,807

1,015,046

1,223,100

2,121,326 1,825,863 -1,632,624 -1,548,865 -1,404,975

2,314,565

1,970,000 1,880,000

1,223,100

-2,600,000 2,590,000 -713,759 -853,890

1,886,241 1,736,110 1,632,624 1,548,865

balances of previous appropriations and budget plans, and anticipated reimbursements.

The 1966 program is specifically directed toward filling combat essential equipment allowances for the ROAD active and high priority reserve Army force, and providing conventional munitions and equipment adequate for sustained combat operations. Modernization of older incapabilities attainable through the introduction of imventories is continued, thereby providing increased proved weapons, equipment, and munitions.

1. Aircraft. The 1966 program contains aircraft which are essential to the combat operation of field forces.

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