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and C.-C. n-parafins also may be considered for exemption. Other compounds which have been shown to have low reactivity include cyclohexanone, ethyl acetate, diethylamine, isobutyl acetate, Isopropyl alcohol, methyl benzoate, 2-nitropropane, phenyl acetate and triethylamine. This emission limitation may impose an economic burden upon some paint spray booth installations. If such sources are not major contributors to hydrocarbon pollution levels, they may appropriately be considered for exemption.

4.7 Architectural coatings for buildings. The emission of organic compounds from architectural coatings can be reduced by requiring the use of water-base or other coatings having an organic solvent content of less than 20 percent by volume. The effectiveness of the limitations set forth in 88 4.6 and 4.7 will vary, depending on the nature and amounts of emissions in an area; a rough estimate based on Los Angeles emission data indicates that application of the limitation would result in a 70 percent reduction in organic solvent emissions. In estimating the effectiveness, it should be assumed that all organic emissions are reactive; use of exempt solvents as substitutes for regulated solvents may be considered 100 percent effective in reducing reactive organic solvent emissions. 5.0 CONTROL OF CARBON MONOXIDE EMISSIONS

The emissions of carbon monoxide can be limited by requiring complete secondary combustion of waste gas generated in such operations as a grey Iron cupola, blast fur. nace, basic oxygen steel furnace, catalyst regeneration of a petroleum cracking system, petroleum fuid coker or other petroleum process.

CONTROL OF NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSIONS 6.1 Fuel burning equipment. The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from gas-fired fuel burning equipment can be limited to 0.2 pound per million B.t.u. (0.36 gm/100 gm-cal) of heat input. This emission limitation is about equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentration of 175 p.p.m., by volume, on a dry basis at 3 percent oxygen and represents about a 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions from uncontrolled gas-fired equipment.

The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from oil-fired fuel burning equipment can be limited to 0.30 pound per million B.t.u. (0.54 gm /106 gm-cal) of heat input. This emission limítation is about equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentration of 230 p.p.m., by volume, on a dry basis, at 3 percent oxygen and represents about a 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions from uncontrolled oil. fired fuel burning equipment.

6.2 Nitric acid manufacture. The emission of nitrogen oxides, calculated as nitrogen dioxide, from nitric acid manufacturing plants can be limited to 5.5 pounds per ton (2.8 kg. /metric ton) of 100 percent acid produced. This emission limitation is about

equivalent to a nitrogen dioxide concentre-
tion of 400 p.p.m., by volume.
(36 F.R. 23398, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at
36 F.R. 25233, Dec. 30, 1971)
APPENDIX C-MAJOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

CHEMICAL PROCESS INDUSTRIES
Adipic acid.
Ammonia.
Ammonium nitrate.
Carbon black.1
Charcoal.
Chlorine.
Detergent and soap.1
Explosives (TNT and nitrocellulose).
Hydrofluoric acid.
Nitric acid.
Paint and varnish manufacturing.
Phosphoric acid.
Phthalic anhydride.
Plastics manufacturing.
Printing ink manufacturing.
Sodium carbonate.1
Sulfuric acid.
Synthetic fibers.
Synthetic rubber.
Terephthalic acid.

FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES
Alfalfa dehydrating.
Ammonium nitrate.
Coffee roasting?
Cotton ginning.
Feed and grain.
Fermentation processes.
Fertilizers,
Fish meal processing.
Meat smoke houses.
Starch manufacturing.
Sugar cane processing.1

METALLURGICAL INDUSTRIES
Primary metals industries:

Aluminum ore reduction,
Copper Smelters.1
Ferroalloy production,
Iron and steel mills.
Lead smelters,1
Metallurgical coke manufacturing.'

Zinc.
Secondary metals Industries:

Aluminum operations.
Brass and bronze smelting.
Ferroalloys.
Gray Iron foundries.1
Lead smelting.1
Magnesium smelting.
Steel foundries."
Zinc processes."

6.0

MINERAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES

Asphalt roofing.
Asphaltic concrete batching.
Bricks and related clay refractories.
Calcium carbide.1
Castable refractories.
Cement.1
Ceramic and clay processes."

(See footnote 1 on page 239.)

Clay and fly ash sintering.

PETROLEUM REFINING AND PETROCHEMICAL Coal cleaning.

OPERATIONS :
Concrete batching.
Fiberglass manufacturing.1

WOOD PROCESSING ?
Frit manufacturing.

PETROLEUM STORAGE (Storage tanks and Glass manufacturing.

bulk terminals) Gypsum manufacturing. Lime manufacturing.

MISCELLANEOUS Mineral wool manufacturing.

Fossil fuel steam electric powerplants. Paperboard manufacturing.

Municipal or equivalent incinerators. Perlite manufacturing.

Open burning dumps. Phosphate rock preparation. Rock, gravel, and sand quarrying and proc- 1 Major sources of sulfur oxides and/or essing.1

particulate matter. APPENDIX D-(POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SOMMABY, TONS/YR. (OB METRIC TONS/TR.)

(EXAMPLE REGIONS)

AIR QUALITY CONTROL REGION
DATA REPRESENTATIVE OF CALENDAR YEAR ...

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sources: A. Residential fuel: 1. Anthracite coal:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 2. Bituminous coal:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 3. Distillate oil:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 4. Residual oil:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 5. Natural gas:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources 6. Wood:

a. Ares sources.

b. Point sources 7. Other (specify):

8. Area sources..

b. Point sources 8. Total.. B. Commercial and institutional fuel: 1. Anthracite coal:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 2. Bituminous coal:

8. Ares sources.

b. Point sources 3. Distillate oil:

8. Ares sources.

b. Point sources. 4. Residual oil:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 5. Natural Gas:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 6. Wood:

8. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 7. Other (specify):

8. Area sources

b. Point sources. 8. Total.... (Footnotes at end of table.)

APPENDIX D (POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SUMMARY, TONS/YR. (EXAMPLE REGIONS AND

WHERE EMISSION LIMITATIONS ARE DEVELOPED)-Continued

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I. Fuel combustion-stationary
sources-Continued
C. Industrial fuel:
1. Anthracite coal:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 2. Bituminous coal:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 3. Coke:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 4. Distillate oil:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 5. Residual oil:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 6. Natural gas:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 7. Process gas:

a. Area sources

b. Point sources. 8. Other (specify):

8. Area sources

b. Point sources.
9. Total...
D. Steam-electric power plant

fuel (point sources only):
1. Anthracite coal.
2. Bituminous coal.
3. Coke.
4. Distillate oll.
6. Residual oil.
6. Natural gas.
7. Process gas.
8. Other (specify).

9. Total...
E. Total stationary fuel com-

bustion. II. Process losses:

A. Ares sources iv
B. Point sources
1. Chemical process indus-

tries.
2. Food and agricultural

industries.
3. Metallurgical industries.
4. Mineral products indus-

tries.
5. Petroleum refining and

petrochemical opera

tions...
6. Wood processing.

7. Petroleum storage..
C. Total process losses..
III, Solid waste disposal:
A. Incineration:
1. On-site:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources. 2. Municipal, etc.:

a. Area sources.

b. Point sources (Footnotes at end of table.)

APPENDIX D-(POLLUTANT) EMISSIONS INVENTORY SUMMARY, TONS/YR. (EXAMPLE REGIONS AND

WHERE EMISSION LIMITATIONS ARE DEVELOPED)-Continued

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III. Solid waste disposal-Con.
B. Open burning:
1. On-site:

2. Ares sources

b. Point sources. 2. Dumps:

a. Area sources..

b. Point sources C. Other (specify):

1. Area sources

2. Point sources. D. Total solid waste disposal. IV. Transportation (area sources only): A. Motor vehicles:

1. Gasoline powered

2. Diesel powered..
B. Off-highway fuel usage.
C. Aircraft
D. Railroads.
E. Vessels.
F. Gasoline handling evapo-

rative losses i G. Other (specify).

H. Total transportation...... V. Miscellaneous (area sources only):

A. Forest fires.
B. Structural fires.
C. Coal refuse burning.
D. Agricultural burning.
E. Other (specify).....
F. Total miscellaneous...

C. Total... i Included only if interstate region. II "Existing Emissions". fii Emissions Achieved" with control regulations of implementation plans. Must be submitted in example regions.

For hydrocarbons only, would include emissions or surface coating operations, dry cleaning, degreasing operations, etc., unless considered point sources. For hydrocarbons, would include vehicle evaporative losses.

For hydrocarbons only, would include losses from filling tank trucks, service station tanks, and automobile tanks. APPENDIX EPOINT SOURCE DATA

D. Year in which data are recorded. (The following information is not required

E. Future activities, if available (e.g., adto be submitted with an implementation

dition of new or expansion of existing facilplan but must be available for inspection by

ities, changes in production rate, installation the Administrator, EPA.)

of control equipment, phasing out of equip

ment, fuel change, etc.). 1. GENERAL SOURCE INFORMATION

F. Map or general layout of large complex A. Establishment name and address.

plants showing locations of various facilities, B. Person to contact on air pollution mat- if available.1 ters and telephone number.

II. FUEL COMBUSTION C. Operating schedule: 1. Percent of annual production by season. A. Number of bollers. 2. Days of week normally in operation. B. Type of fuel burning equipment for

3. Shifts or hours of day normally in each boller. operation. 4. Number of days per year in operation. (See footnote 1 on page 242.)

C. Rated and/or maximum capacity of each G. Emission data: boller, 10% B.t.u./hr. or kcal/br.

1. Based on emission factors. D. Types of fuel burned, quantities, and 2. Estimate of emissions by the source. characteristics:

3. Results of any stack tests conducted. 1. Type of each fuel used and place of

IV. SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL origin. 2. Maximum and average quantity per

A. Amount and description of solid waste hour.

generated, quantity per year. 3. Quantity per year.

B. Percent of total that is combustible. 4. Sulfur content (as received), percent. C. Method of disposal (on-site or off5. Ash content (as received), percent.

site). 6. Heat content (as received), B.t.u. or D. Description of on-site disposal method, kcal/unit of measure.

if applicable (incineration, open burning, 7. Estimate of future usage, if available. landfill, etc.) including maximum quantities

E. Percent used for space heating and disposed per hour and average quantities process heat.

disposed per year and actual operating F. Air pollution control equipment (ex- schedule. isting and proposed):

1. Location of the source by a grid sys1. Type.

tem (UTM or equivalent). 2. Collection efficiency (design and actual), 2. If method of disposal is by an incinerapercent.

tor, include the following information: G. Stack data:

&. Auxiliary fuel used. 1. List stacks by boilei 3 served.

b. Air pollution control equipment (exist2. Location of stacks by grid coordinates ing and proposed): (Universal Transverse Mercator, UTM, or (1) Type. equivalent).1

(2) Collection efficiency (actual and de3. Stack height, feet or meters.

sign), percent. 4. Stack diameter (inside, top), feet or c. Stack data: meters.

(1) List stacks by furnaces served. 5. Exit gas temperature, •F. or °C.

(2) Stack height, feet or meters. 6. Exit gas velocity, feet/sec. or meters/ (3) Stack diameter (inside, top), feet or sec.

meters. H. Emission data:

(4) Exit gas temperature, °F. or 'C. 1. Based on emission factors.

(5) Exit gas velocity, feet/sec. or meters/ 2. Estimate of emissions by the source.

sec. 3. Results of any stack tests conducted.

(6) Exit gas moisture content, percent 11 III. MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES (PROCESS

avallable.

3. Emission data: LOSSES)

a. Based on emission factors. A. Process name or description of each

b. Estimate of emissions by the source. product. B. Quantity of raw materials used and

c. Results of any stack tests conducted. handled for each product, maximum quan

APPENDIX F-AREA SOURCE DATA 1 tity per hour, and average quantity per year. (The following information is not required

c. Quantity of each product manufac- to be submitted with an implementation tured, maximum quantity per hour, and plan but must be available for inspection by average quantity per year.

the Administrator, EPA) D. Description of annual, seasonal, Grid Coordinate (lower left-hand corner) monthly, weekly, and daily operating cycle

UTM or equivalent." including downtime for maintenance and

Average Stack Height of sources repairs. E. Air pollution control equipment in

I. FUEL COMBUSTION-STATIONARY SOURCES use (existing and proposed):

Includes sulfur and ash content of fuels, 11 E. Air pollution control equipment in use applicable). (existing and proposed):

A, Residential Fuel: 1. Type.

1. Anthracite Coal (plus type and size of 2. Collection efficiency (design and actual), unit) tons/year or metric tons/year. percent. F. Stack data:

1 Emissions data for all source categories 1. List of stacks by equipment served. and subcategories should be summarized in

2. Location of stacks by grid location the implementation plans as is in Appendix (UTM or equivalent).1

Dor G. 3. Stack height, feet or meters.

• Data is required on a grid basis only when 4. Stack diameter (inside, top), feet or

diffusion modeling 18 utilized. For propormeters.

tional model technique, data must be avail5. Exit gas temperature, 'F. or •C.

able on a county basis. 6. Edt gas velocity, feet/sec. or meters/

• Required only when diffusion modeling is sec.

utilized.

• Average type and size for each category. 1 Required only when diffusion modeling is This is used as the basis for selection of utilized.

average emission factor.

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