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lectors of some class of objects, howsoever simple may be their character; it being always remembered that no object can belong to a Local Museum which has not been found within a radius of five miles from the Parish Church, a map of such district being provided by the Committee. Those who do not make collections themselves may still send contributions to the Collectors; and even those who do not act as contributors or collectors may keep records of various kinds, such as of the earliest and latest appearance of birds, flowers, &c., the readings of the barometer, thermometer, and the rain gauge.

4. To circulate in the parish the names and addresses of the Museum Collectors, together with the names of the objects they are appointed by the Committee to collect, so that any parishioners may be able to send to the Museum Collectors objects belonging to their particular departments.

5. The Museum Collectors to begin the formation of collections at their own houses, the Committee upon application, being prepared to take into consideration the payment of expenses incurred in the preparation and preservation of objects.

6. When they think it desirable, the Committee may provide cases for the reception of specimens. These cases to be made upon some uniform plan, so that whenever a fitting room is provided for the Museum, these cases may form a regular continuous series.

7. Each object for the Museum to be labelled with the following particulars, legibly written :

1. Vame of object.......
2. Where found ............
3. When found ....

4. Name and Address of Collector .......... 8. Museum meetings to be held in some suitable room every few weeks, so that the Museum Collectors

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may place before the parishioners the specimens in their possession, and hints may be exchanged regarding the mode of collecting, preserving, and arranging specimens, and respecting future operations.

It is hoped that the foregoing plan for the formation of Local Museums will prove acceptable not only to those who take an interest in the observation of Nature's works, and who desire to see a love for them generally diffused, but also to those who are more directly interested in improving the social relations of all classes ; for by the plan suggested, all may be brought into befitting intercourse ; working men taking an interest in any branch of Natural History will visit the houses of their richer neighbours with feelings of interest and of manly independence; the richer classes will enter the homes of the working people on other grounds, than because thor a homes are stricken with poverty or disease.

LIST OF OBJECTS AND SUBJECTS to be taken charge of

by Parishioners forming a Local Museum. The following list has been prepared for the purpose of enabling each parishioner (alone, or with one or two others) to choose the special class of objects he may wish to collect for the Museum ; a space is therefore left after the name of each object for the insertion of the name and address of the Collector or Collectors. The circulation in the parish of these “Notes,” containing the names and addresses of the Collectors, will enable parishioners to send to the Collectors the objects belonging to their particular departments.

Another aim in drawing up this list has been to give brief suggestions to parishioners desirous of becoming Collectors, respecting the mode of collecting

and preserving the several objects. Further suggestions on this subject will be found in the little book entitled “ Hints on the Formation of Local Museums,” to which is appended a list of books on Geology, Botany, and Natural History, with their prices. It may be stated here, that the facilities for the preservation of objects have been greatly increased of late years by the small price of bottles, and of spirits of wine. Methylated spirits may be bought for three shillings and sixpence a gallon.

(a)-THE MINERAL KINGDOM.

COLLECTOR.

Name................

Address ..........

(This department may be illustrated by collecting specimens of the surface-soil, different kinds of peat, clay, sand, loam, gravel, &c.; also specimens of fossils, stones, slates, minerals, metals, coal, &c.; and their uses, or probable uses, pointed out.)

(6)—THE VEGETABLE KINGDOM. 1. LEAVES.

COLLECTOR
Name.............
Address ...........

(A collection should be made of the leaves of all species of plants in the district, evergreen and deciduous ; a series made of the finest specimens, noting the exact sizes ; a series showing the stages in the growth of leaves from the bud to the fall ; skeletons of leaves ; diseases of leaves ; leaves bored by insects; series showing the colours of leaves, &c.)

2. TENDRILS.

COLLECTOR.
Name.............
Address..

(Different kinds, different stages of growth.)

3. SEEDS AND SEED-VESSELS.

COLLECTOR.
Name............
Address.

(Collections should be made of all the seeds and seed-vessels in the district, arranging them in classes, as the different kinds of acorns, &c. ; also a series showing the finest specimens of seed, giving their exact weight when ripe; also a series of the finest ears of corn, barley, oats, &c., with their weight, admeasurements, &c.)

4. FRUITS.

COLLECTOR.

Name..........
Address .........

(A complete collection to be made both of garden fruits and wild fruits ; some may be preserved in spirit, and some may be dried; diseased specimens also to be preserved.)

5. BARK.

COLLECTOR

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Name.....................
Address ....................

(A good collection should be made of the bark of each kind of tree in the district; also of the same kind of tree at different ages; specimens of bark in section should be made, also fine sections for the microscope; also specimens of bark to show the different species of lichens that grow upon them respectively ; specimens of diseaseto be also preserved.)

6. WOODS.

COLLECTOR.

Name ..........

ini

Address .......

(Specimens of the various woods should be preserved, some in plain section, others polished; also fine sections for the microscope; also specimens of the spray of trees.)

7. ROOTS.

COLLECTOR.

Name .......

Address ......

(A collection to be made of different kinds of roots, garden and wild ; also the different stages of their growth to be shown, and the size and weight of the finest specimens to be noted ; also their diseases, &c.)

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Address ......

(Sections of stems, small and large, to be made, to show the pith in its various proportions and structure ; specimens also to be prepared for the microscope.)

9. THORNS.

COLLECTOR.

Nanie..............

Address .....

(The various kinds of thorns to be shown by specimens; also every variety of thorn; also the different stages of their growth.)

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