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The auld Minister's Song

Rev. John Skinner

289

The auld Stuarts back again

Anonymous

. 273

The Banks of Ayr

Burns

. 98

The Banks of Doon .

. 107

The Barring o' the Door.

Herd's Collection" . 210

The Battle of Vittoria

William Glen

. 178

The Birks of Aberfeldy

Burns

. 100

The Black Bird

Tea-Table Miscellany" · 255

The blaithrie o't

Charmer

. 199

The blue-eyed Lassie

Burns

111

The Boatie rows

Johnson's Museum". . 85

The bonnie House o' Airly

Anonymous .

. 298

The bonnie Rowan Bush .

Robert Nicoll

. 166

The bonny Breast-knots .

Peter Buchan's Collection" 294
The Braes of Yarrow

Rev. John Logan

73

The brisk young Lad

Anonymous

The Bush aboon Traquair

Robert Crawford

53
The captive Huntsman

Sir Walter Scott
The Chevalier's Lament .

Burns .

. 282

The Collier's bonnie Lassie

Allan Ramsay

38

The Day returns, my Bosom burns. Burns.

The Deil's awa' wi' the Exciseman

241

The drucken Wife o' Galloway

Herd's Collection"

236

The Duke of Cumberland

Peter Buchan's Collection274

The dusty Miller

" Johnson's Museum". . 212

The dying Soldier

Burns

. 172

The Evening Star

Dr. John Leyden

The Ewe-bughts

Tea-Table Miscellany' 51

The Ewie wi' the Crookit Horn

Rev. John Skinner . 287

The Flowers of the Forest (first version) Jane Elliot .

75
The Flowers of the Forest (second version) Mrs. Cockburn

76
The Highland Character .

Sir Harry Erskine 168
The Highland Laddie

Allan Ramsay

42
The Highland Widow's Lament

Anonymous

272

The Lark.

James Hogg

305

The Lass o’ Arranteenie

Robert Tannahill

. 131
The Lass o' Gowrie

Anonymous

145
The Lass o' Patie's Mill

Allan Ramsay

36
The last time I cam' o'er the Muir

29

The Lea-Rig

Burns

96

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The making o' the Hay

Robert Nicoll

. 165

The Miller.

Sir John Clerk

192

The old Man's Song

Rev. John Skinner

225
The red, red Rose

Witherspoon's Collection” 95

The Reel o' Bogie

S Alexander fourth Duke of

Gordon .

. 293

There's nae Luck about the House

William Julius Mickle 89

There'll never be peace

Burns

. 261

The Soldier's Return

. 93

The Spring of the Year

Allan Cunningham

142
The Tears I shed must ever fall

Mrs. Dugald Stewart . 84
The Tears of Scotland

Tobias Smollett.

258
The Thistle of Scotland

Jacobite Relics"

. 182
The three-gir'd Cog.

Anonymous

230

The waefu' Heart

Susanna Blamire

. 135

The waukin' o' the Fauld

Allan Ramsay

37
The wee German Lairdie

Hogg's Jacobite Relics" . 268
The Wee Thing

Hector Macneil

66
The white Cockade

Her's Collection"

261

The Woodlark

Burns

. 109

The

away

Mr. Dunlop

. 247

The yellow-hair'd Laddie

Allan Ramsay

31
This is no mine ain House

41
Thou art gane awa'

Anonymous

83

Thou hast sworn by thy God, my Jeannie Allan Cunningham 144

Through the wood, Laddie

Tea-Table Miscellany"

Thy fatal Shafts

Tobias Smollett

58

Tibbie Fowler

Herd's Collection"

To daunton me

Chiefly by Burns

. 220

To Mary in Heaven .

Burns

90

Tullochgorum

Rev. John Skinner

284

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Most writers upon the subject of Scottish song and music have hitherto drawn a marked distinction between England and Scotland. They have considered the people on the two sides of the Tweed to be quite distinct-each with a music and a literature as well as opinions of its own. While it has been impossible for any writer to deny that England possessed a literature exclusively of English growth, of which it might well be proud, and of the whole benefit of which Scotland has been the partaker, it has been very generally denied that England possessed any music worthy of the name. On the other hand, honours have been heaped upon Scotland, both for her literature and for her music, which, though by no means undeserved,

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ought to have been shared with England as the mother and source from which they were derived. It is possible that, in attempting to clear up some of the misconceptions which appear to exist upon this subject, we may run counter to the preconceived notions of many persons.

But we shall not rob " the land of cakes” of any thing—not of a single melody out of the many hundreds of beautiful compositions that have given Scottish music a reputation as wide as the civilised world; we shall merely endeavour to show that English and Scottish music and song are of the same root and stock, that the birth-place of both was England, and that their separate growth and individuality have by no means effaced the strong family-likeness. All readers and singers will readily admit that the stores of Scottish song are not only extremely fertile, but that the Scottish mind has a tendency to develop its overflowing tenderness and earnest passionateness in lyrical strains of the simplest beauty, which no literature and no age of the world have surpassed. It is also beyond doubt that the Scottish lyra possesses, in addition to all the excellences which it can derive from the fervid and vigorous English language, a quaintness and a grace, an elegant simplicity, and an affectionate tenderness, which are peculiarly its own. But in acknowledging all this, and much more, it is not necessary to admit the claim of those who assert Scottish music to be a thing apart as well as transcendent, and who would deny England any share in its merits, or in the glory of having either originated it or developed it.

Nearly all the beautiful music and delicious snatches of song, commonly considered to be Scottish, belong to that section of Scotland known as the Lowlands, a country in which the people speak one of the many “Doric” dialects of the

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