British Conchology: Marine shells, comprising the brachiopoda and conchifera from the family of Anomiidae to that of Mactridae

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Page xii - When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss and loss with store; When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay; Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate, That Time will come and take my love away.
Page 441 - Keeps honour bright : To have done, is to hang Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail In monumental mockery.
Page 301 - Ireland) were under his examination, but at shorter intervals on receiving fresh supplies of sea-water. The animal appeared to Mr. Bulwer to be insensible both to sound and light, as the presence or absence of either did not at all interrupt its movements ; but its sense of feeling appeared to be very delicate. Minute substances dropped into the orifice of the mantle instantly excited the animal, and a column of water strongly directed expelled them from the shell ; with so much strength was the...
Page 447 - Happy is he who lives to understand, Not human nature only, but explores All natures, — to the end that he may find , The law that governs each; and where "' begins The union, the partition where, that makes Kind and degree, among all visible Beings; The constitutions, powers, and faculties...
Page 231 - Thou, my Friend ! art one More deeply read in thy own thoughts; to thee Science appears but what in truth she is, Not as our glory and our absolute boast, But as a succedaneum, and a prop To our infirmity.
Page 61 - On close investigation, however, we found that it was the fry of Pecten opercularis skipping quite nimbly through the pool. Their motion was rapid and zigzag, very like that of ducks in a sunny blink, rejoicing in the prospect of rain. They seemed, by the sudden opening and closing of their valves, to have the power of darting like an arrow through the water. One jerk carried them some yards, and then by another sudden jerk they were off in a moment on a different tack.
Page viii - There is a magnet-like attraction in These waters to the imaginative power, That links the viewless with the visible, And pictures things unseen.
Page 74 - ... fathoms. It is also not uncommon in all our upper tertiaries, both new and old. Its foreign range comprises all the sea-bed lying between Norway and the Canaries ; and, according to Sars, it occurs with arctic shells in the " postglacial " beds of Christiania. If the oyster is the king of mollusks, this has a just claim to the rank and title of prince. In Lister's time they were held in nearly the same esteem; and the great scallop is even preferred by some, although from its luscious quality...
Page 40 - chasing a pearly tear away," whilst he calls to mind how all these delicate beings came into the world, and vanished, to so little purpose...
Page 91 - A remarkable peculiarity of Lima consists in the tenacious grasp of its tentacles. Sometimes when my finger touched the animal, it was rapidly seized by the tentacles, as by those of an Actinia, and so firmly that I have thus dragged the Lima round the tank. It seldom let go its hold till the tentacles were torn away, or, as I believe, voluntarily thrown off by the animal. The tentacles so detached still adhere closely to the object they have grasped, their free ends twisting about as if in conscious...

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