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COBHAM, Richard Temple, Viscount,' brave discipline, contempt for, iii. 334 n. 9; 'af-
to the latest breath,' iji. 206 n. 1; friendship, fected the obsolete,' 341; appearance, 'de-
advantages of his, ii. 313; Gilbert West's cent,' 336 ; Aristotle's Poetics, plans trans-
uncle, iii. 328; Pope's intimacy, 205 n. 8, lation of, 336; bailiff, 'immured' by, 336;
206; praised by Pope and Thomson, 206 12. I. birth, &c., 334; black-letter books, 337 n. 3;
COBHAM, Lady, iii. 206 n. 1, 425.

booksellers, advances from, 336; chaplaincy,
CODRINGTON FAMILY, iii. 364.

regimental, thinks of getting, 335 n. 2; char-
Cofferer, iii. 451 n. 1.

acter and genius, 337-9; cheerful disposition,
COLBATCH, Dr. John, of Trinity College, 336; clusters of consonants, 341 ; Cowper's
Cambridge, ii. 293.

estimate, 339 n. 3; creditors, pressed by, 335,
COLE, Rev. Williarn, iii. 431 n. 5.

336; death, 339; depression of mind, 338,
COLE, William, M.D., ii. 237 n. 5.

339 n. 2; diction, 341; Dirge in Cymbeline,
COLE, Mr., an Oxford apothecary, ii. 13. 339 n. 4; existence, unknown to Cowper,
COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor, Asgill's Eng- 339 n. 3; fairies, genii, &c., loved, 337;
lish, iii. 12 n. 5; Burnet's credulity, i. 128 first publication, 334, 342; Flanders, 335
1. 5; Congreve's comedies, ii. 222 n. 5; n. 2; Gentleman's Magazine, contributed to,
Cowley and Donne, i. 21 1. 3, 42 n. 4; C. 334, 339 1.4; Hist. of the l'evival of Learn.
and Milton, 56 n. 1; C.'s latinity, 66; C., ing, published proposals for, 335; inherited
Marini, and Darwin, 69; Cowper and Thom. small property, 335 n. 1; irresolution, 335;
son, iii, 298 11. 7; double epithets in Shake- Johnson's affection for him, 339 ; J., described
speare and Milton, 437 n. 1; Dryden's genius, in Poetical Calendar by, 337 n. 2; J., first
223 n. 1; D.'s prose, i. 418 n. 5; farce- meets, 336; J., resemblance to, 335 11. 1;
tragedy' at funeral, 150 n. 1; Gray's lyrics, J., visited by, 339; Julius II and Cosmo
iii. 440 n. 9; G.'s rhymes, 423 n. 4, 434 de' Medici, 335 n. 5; learning, 336, 337,
11. 4; Hacket's Life of Williams, 325; Mil. 338 n. 4; legacy from uncle, 336; lite-
ton's Arianism, i. 155 n. 5; M. an aristocrat, rary adventurer, comes to town a, 335 ;
157 n. 3; M.'s Latin verses, 161 n. 4; M.'s Magdalen College, Oxford, 334; mental dis-
Paradise Lost, 171 n. 4; M.'s Paradise Re- order, 337, 339, 340; morals, pure, 338;
gained, 147 11. 4, 188 n. 6; M.'s prose works, New College, Oxford, no_vacancy at, 334;
104 n. 3; mythology of our eldest poets, Odes, 335 n. 6; Ode to Evening, 341 n. 5;
213 n. 2; Pope's choice of words, iii. 217 Ode on the Superstitions of the Highlands,
n. 1; P.'s Iliad, 119. n. 2; Sprat's Life of 340; Oriental Ecloguies: see Persian Eclo-
Cowley, i. 1 1. 3; Swift and Rabelais, iii. 51 gucs; Otway and the River Arun, i. 241
n. 1; S.'s riddles and trisyllable lines, 66 11. 1; 1. 3 ; Oxford degree, iii. 334; 0. madhouse,
'talented,' 434 n. 2; Thomson's blank verse, taken to, 339 11. 2; 0., subscriptions in, 335
298 nn.; West, Gilbert, 332 11. 5; Young's n. 4; 0., suddenly left, 334; O., visits, 339
Night Thoughts, 395 n. 4, 399 n. 6.

Persian Eclogues, advertized, 335
COLESHILL, i. 349, 276.

n. 6; called 'Irish Eclogues,' 340; Gold-
Colet, Dean, iii. 317 n. 4.

smith praises them, 339 1. 2, 340 11. I; pre-
COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Censors, ii. 60 ferred to Odes, 340 1. 1; republished as
il. 8, 249; Crounian lecture, iii. 415 n. 8; Oriental Eclogues, 335 11. 6; written at
Dryden's funeral, i. 392 n. 1, 486 ; Fellows, ii. Winchester, 340 n. I; piety, 338, 339 ;
236; scheme for giving free advice to poor, Poems, reprinted, 341 n. 6; poetic imagina-
57-60.

tion, 337, 341 1. 6; poverty, 335, 338;
Collier, Jeremy, attacks the drama, i. 401, Queen's College, Oxford, commoner of, 334;
ii. 126 n. 3, 219-23, 241; citizens in comedy, Salmon's Modern History, reads, 340 11. 1;
236 n. 6; Congreve's Double Dealer, 217 school exercises, 334; studied to live, 337 ;
n. 5; C.'s Love for Love, 223; C.'s Old table and bottle, snatched relief from, 341;
Bachelor, 214 1. 4; C. and Vanbrugh reply temperate in eating and drinking,' 341 n. 1;
to him, 214, 222 ; C.'s Way of the World, Testament, only book on travels, 339; Thom.
sneered at in, 222 1. 2; controversy, formed son's Seasons and Pope's Pastorals, 284 n. 1;
for, 220; Defence of the Short View, 222 11. 3; Thomson and Warton, 282 12. 2; tragedies,
Dryden, attacks on, i. 364 n. 3, 401 n. 5, planned several, 335; travels to dispel de-
403 n. 5, ii. 222; D.'s reply, i. 401; D.'s pression, 339; Wartons, the, visited by, 340;
Miscellany, ii. 83 n. 10; Dursey, attacks, 221 wasted his property, 334 1. 9; Winchester
n. 4; ' fierce and implacable Non-juror,' 220; College, 334, 340 n. 1; Wordsworth praises
Hazlitt's and Leigh Hunt's criticisms, 220 him, 341 n. 6; quotations, Epistle to
n. 5, 223 11. I; 'horse-play of his raillery,' i. Hanmer, 335 11. 5, 338 n. 2 ; Ode on ihe death
401, ii. 221 n. 2; Macaulay, praised by, 220 of Thomson, 294 n. 4; Ode to Fear, 337 n. 4,
11. 5, 221 n. 1; Short Vicw of the English 341 n. 5; Ode to Pity, i. 241 n. 3, iii. 341 n. 5.
Slage, 220 ; 'spoilt the stage,' 223 11. 1. COLLITON, Mrs., Earl Rivers's mistress, ii.
COLLINS, William, the poet's father, iii. 334.

326 n. 3.
COLLINS, William, academic studies and COLMAN, George, the elder, Gay's Polly,

n. 2;

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revived, ii. 279 n. 2; Ode to Oblivion and
Obscurity, iii. 427; Savage's Sir Thonias
Overbury, revived, ii. 341 11. 3.
COLONIES, ii. 393.
COMBER, Dr. Thomas, Master of Trinity
College, Cambridge, i. 4.
COMMINS, Eustace, ii. 138.
COMMON READEK, finally decides claims
to poetical honoars, iii. 441.
COMPOSITION, methods of, iii. 218.
COMPTON, Henry, Bishop of London, i.
301, ii. 35, iii. 252.
COMPTON, Sir Spencer, afterwards Earl of
Wilmington, Broome, praised by, iii. 80 n. 1;
Thomson's patron, 284, 285; Young's fourth
Satire dedicated to him, 372.
Comus of Erycius Puteanus, i. 92 n. 4.

CONCANEN, Matthew, iii. 166, 260 n. 2,
413 n. 4.
CONGLETON, ii. 49.
CONGREVE, Richard, the poet's grand-
father, ii. 212.
CONGREVE, William, Addison and Halifax,
ii. 84; A.'s lines on him, 226 n. 2 ; A.'s Ode to
William III, 127 n. 6; Amendments upon
Mr. Collier's False and Imperfect Citations,
222 1. 1; anecdote, 221 n. 5 ; Art of Pleas-
ing, 233; author, early an, 213; -Beg-
gar's Opera, couplet imitated in, 234 n. 2;
shown to him, 376; birth, &c., 212;
Birth of the Muse, 232 ; Blackmore, attacked
by, i. 402; B., mutual praise, ii. 241 ; Blenheim,
celebrated, 186 n. 2 ; blindness, 224 n. 3, 227;
carriage accident, 227; Collier controversy,
214, 219–23; commissioner for licensing
coaches, 215; commissioner for wine licences,
215 n. 8; companion, agreeable, 224 n. 2;
contemporary writers, honoured by, 226;
cuckoo in August, 228 n. 1: customs, place
in, 215; death, 227; dedications to him, 226;
Doris, 233 ; Double Dealer, 217, 223 n. 1;
Dryden's character, describes, i. 394, 483;
D., defended against Addison, ii. 120 ; D.'s
Epistle to him, 224 n. 2; D., line borrowed
from, 232 ; D.'s intended monument, i. 393 ;
D., praises, 456; D., recommended by, ii.
215; D.'s variety, i. 469 n. 4; D.'s Virgil, ii.
226 n. 2; early genius, 219; easy writing,
8 n. 3; 'friendly Congreve,' 224 n. 2; Garth,
praises, 241 n. 3; Gay's lines on him, 224
n. 2, 231 n. 4; genteel comedy,' 228 n. 3;
Goldsmith, praised by, 228 n. 3; goat, 227;
Halifax, his patron, 215, 217, 225; Harley,
protected by, 225; Haymarket Theatre,
manager of, 224 n. 1; Hazlitt's criticisms,
216 n. 4, 230 n. 1; Horace, imitations of,
233; Hunt's, Leigh, criticisms, 214 n. 2,
216 n. 3, 318 n. 6, 219 n. 1, 223 n. 6, 228
11. 2, 233 n. 8; Ilam, visits, 212 n. 3; Iliad,
translations, iii. 205 n. 6; Impossible Thing,
ii. 264 n. 3; Incognita, 214; Judgement of
Paris, 224 n. 1; jamp, great, 227 n. 1;
Kilkenny School, 213; Lamb's praise, 218

n. 5, 222 n. 5; Lincolo's Inn Fields Theatre,
218 n. 6; literary indolence, 225; literature,
226; Love for Love, 218, 223; Macaulay's
criticisms, 323 n. 6, 230 n. I ; man of fashion,
rather than of wit, would be thought, 226;
Marlboroagh, friendship and legacy to younger
Duchess of, 227; Memoirs of Congreve, 212
n. 5; Middle Temple, 213; Miscellaneous
Poems, 225, 234; monument, 212, 227;

Mourning Bride, acted, 218; tomb scene,
329; 'tuneful nonsense,' iii. 397 n. 7;
Mourning Muse of Alexis, ii. 217 n. 6, 230;
Ode on Mrs. Arabella Hunt, 232 ; Ode for
St. Cecilia's Day, 232; official salaries, 226;
Old Batchelor, 213, 214, 216, 236 n. 6; Ou.
denarde, song on, 225 n. 2; parties, lived
with men of all, iii. 205 n. 6; Pindaric
madness, cured, ii. 234; pipe office, place in,
215; PLAYS, characters “fictitious and
artificial,'228; ch., wicked, 222 n.5; dialogue,
328; likely to live, 234; pleasure in alliance
with vice, 222; plots, improbable, 216 n. 5;
P., 'soon puzzle,' 219 n. 1; written before
twenty-eight, 219 n. 6; poems, never
quoted, 234; Pope's Iliad, dedicated to him,
226, iii. 205; his two lines in it, 205 n. 6;
present, when read to Halifax, 126; powers
desert him off stage, ii. 229; Prologue for
John Dryden Jr., i. 393 n. 6; Queen Mary
at his plays, ii. 217; reads plays badly, 215;
Rowe's Biter, 69 n. 4; Secretary to Jamaica,
215 n. 8, 225; Semele, 224 n. 1; Shake-
speare, compared with, 229 n. 2; Sheridan,
compared with, 228 n. 3;' (sits smiling at
the goal,' 224 n. 1; song for Southerne's
Maid's Last Prayer, 214 n. 6; Southey,
criticized by, 232 n. 5; stage, leaves the,
224; Steele's dedications to him, 226 n. 3;
S., praised by, 216 n. 4, 222 n. 4, 233;
sweetness of manners,' 224 n. 2; Swift's
lines on him, 215 n. 8, 226 n. 2 ; see Swift;
Tale of a Tub, iii. 51 n. 1; Tatler, con-
tributed to, ii. 224; Tories, retained in
places by, 225; Translations, 233; Trinity
College, Dublin, 213; Verses to Lady Gethin,
233; Voltaire on his plays, 228 n. 3; V.,
visited by, 226; Walpole gives him a place, 215
n. 8; Way of the World, 223; Westminster
Abbey, 227; Whig, always a, 225; William
III, his hero, 231 ; wit, his, 228; Young's
lines on him, 224 n. 1; quotations,
Birth of the Muse, 232 ; Epilogue to the
Way of the World, 217 n. 4; Epistle to
Halifax, 234, n. 1; Judgement of Paris, 234
11. 2; Mourning Bride, 219 n.5,229; Mourn.
ing Muse of Alexis, 230; Ode to Will. III,
231, 232, 299 n. 1; Of Pleasing, 233 n. 10,
241 n. 3; Tears of Amaryllis, 231; Verses
to Lady Gethin, 233 n. 7:

CONGREVE, William, the poet's father, ii.
212, 213
CONINGSBY,
CONINGSBY, Thomas, Earl, ii. 191, 192.

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ii. 309 n. 6.

iii. 93.

CONINGTOX, Professor John, Dryden's Vir- Buckingham, befriended by, 16; burial, 17;
gil, i. 454 n. 2; Pitt's Aeneiil, iii. 279 1. 4; 'business,' denounces, 8 n. 1; 'character of
Pope's Iliad, 276; P.'s Imitations of Horace, writing not his own,' 56; Charles II, praised
247 11. I; P.'s Sisyphus and the stone' and by, 17; Chaucer, no taste for, 2 n. 4; Chert-
Johnson's parody, 231 n. 4; Tickell's Iliad, sey, 16, 17, 126 1.6; Chronicle, ‘unrivalled

and alone,' 37 ; C.,'centum amicas enumerat,'
Conjunctive, ii. 171 n. 7.

6 n. 8; Clarendon, praised by, 56, 58 11. 3 ;
Conversation, i. 398 12. 3.

Coleridge's criticisms, 21 n. 3, 42 n. 4, 56 n. 1,
CONWAY, Edward, second Viscount, i. 260, 69; College, imaginary, 99; 'commodious
263, 264, 266.

allusions,' 33; company, his own, the worst
Cooke, Thomas, Battles of the Poets, ii. in the world, 16 11. 5 ; comparisons and allu-
362 1. I.

sions, far-fetched, 29; Complaint, 14; com-
COOPER, John Gilbert, ii. 127 1. I.

pliance with men in power, 10; conceits
COOPER, Samuel, the painter, i. 202. drawn from recesses of learning, 23 ; c. slight
COOPER, M., the bookseller, iii. 443. and trifling, 28 ; C., verses polluted with, 52 ;
COPYRIGHT, Act of Queen Anne, i. 324 C., warmth of soul shines through, 20 n. 2;
n. 3; Donaldson v. Becket and Millar v. C., 333; Constantia and Philetus, 4; con-
Taylor, iii. 284 n. 3.

tentment on £500 a year, 67; contractions,
CORBET, Andrew, of Shropshire, ii. 80. rugged and harsh, 60; conversation, 64;
CORBET, Mrs., Pope's epitaph, iii. 262. 'Cooley,' 5 11. I; court, the, neglected by,
CORBETT, Sir Uvedale, iii. 262 n. 1. 13, 207 ». 5; C., weary of, 15; Cowley's
Cork, Mary, Countess of, ii. 312 11. 5. verse keeps fair Orinda young,' 238 n. 8;
CORNEILLE, Cinna, i. 474 1. 2; Le Cid critical abilities,' 38; Cromwell, verses on
and Richelieu, ii, 102; Pompey, i. 471 n. 4. death of, 10, 11; Cutter of Coleman Street,
CORNISH, Alderman Henry, i. 265 n. 3. 13 n. 3, 14, 42 11. 2, 66; Davenant, verses
CORNWALLIS, Charles, third Baron, ii. 436. to, 38; Davideis, Addison, quoted by,
CORNWALLIS, Charles, first Earl, üi. 8o. 49 n. 3 ; affections never moved, 55; allu-
CORRECTION OF COMPOSITIONS, ii. 243. sions, 52 ; characters, 54, 55; date of com-
CORRECTNESS, in verse, i. 235, ii. 145, 208, position, 4; Dryden borrows from it, 4911. 5,

354; D.'s commendation,63; Gabriel's dress,
CORSHAM, ii. 235.

53; hemistichs, 63 ; 'implex fable,' 54; “in-
Cory, William Johnson, iii. 82 n. I. ferences instead of images,' 51; monosyllabic
COSMO DE' MEDICI, iii. 194 1. 1, 335 n. 5. lines, 61; neglected, 49; notes to it, 38, 54
COTTEREL, Sir Charles, Poliarchas of n. 2 ; Rymer praises it, 49 n. 4, 55; sacred
Orinda's Letters, i. 238 n. 8.

subject, 49; Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata,
COTTINGTON, Lord, i. 261 1. 2.

compared with, 55 ; unfinished, 49; wit and
COTTON, Charles, i. 323.

learning squandered on it, 55 ; death,
Cotton, Sir John, of Madingley, Cam- 17; deciduous laurel,' 56 ; Denham's lines
bridge, iii. 76.

on him, 56, 80, iii. 66 n. 2 ; diction, i. 58;
COUPLETS, i. 81, 419, 443, ii. 209.

Digby, Sir Kenelm, dedication to,4; Doctor
COURTHOPE, William John, editor of Pope's of Physic, 10, 11; Donne, borrows from, 57;
Works, "metaphysical poets,' i. 69 ; Pope's D., his model, 58; dramatic composition,
* Atossa,'iii. 272; P.'s Characters of Women, hints on, 411; ‘Dream of a shadow,' 7 n. I;
175 n. 3; P.'s lines to Thomson, 291 n. 9; Dryden's criticisms, 18 n. 2, 47 n. 4, 58 n. 6,
Pi's Pastorals, 225 n. I ; P.'s Prologue to the 63; Duke of York's Theatre, share in, 66;
Satires, 246 n. 4.

education, sordid and hospital-like,' 86 n. 8;
COURTNEY, Lady Frances, Roscommon's Elegy on Crashaw, 39; Elegy on. Hervey,
wife, i. 232.

36, 163; Elegy on Wotton, 36, 57; English,
COURTNEY, Mr. W. P., ii. 314 11. 3.

pure and genuine, 21 n. 3; Essays, 64;
COURT OF DELEGATES, ii. 28 n. 2. Evelyn, visited by, 16 n. 1; Falkland, obtains
COURT OF THE MARCHES, i, 203.

notice of, 6; F., verses to, 36; ‘familiar and
Cousin, iii. 326.

festive, greatest in the, 40; filial gratitude,
Cowley, Abraham, adaptations of ancient 2; France, residence in, 6, 8, 10, 11 ; Gibbon,
poetry, i. 224 n. 1; Addison's Account of quoted by, 12 n. 2 ; 'God the first garden
English Poets and Spectator, 41 11. ; Against made,' 12 n. 2; grammar rules, conld not
Hope, 33 ; agricultural colleges, anticipates, retain, 3, 65; Gray's criticisms, 35 11. 2, 68;
12 1.1; Alexandrines, 63, 466 n. 4, 467; Grotius, copied, 57; Guardian, The, re-
American plantations, plans retirement to, peated' at Cambridge, 5; G., fitted for stage
10; Anacreontiques, 39, 40; 'Anglorum as Cutter of Coleman Street, 14; *Heleonora,'
Pindarus,' 18 n. 2; arrested and imprisoned, 6 n.8; Horace, Epis. i. 2. 40, version of, 62 ;
9; Barn-elms, 16; beloved by every Muse,' Hume's criticism, 59 n. 1 ; Hymn to Light,
64; Bentley, imitated by, 38; birth, &c., 1, ii. 301; hyperboles, enormous and disgusting,
2; ' borrowed little,' 56; botany, studies, 12; i. 27; indelicate and disgusting, sometimes,

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n. 2;

32; Jersey, lines from, 38; Johnson, line
altered by, 461; Jonson, obligation to, 58 ;
just estimate of own performances, 39;
Juvenilia, 'lisp'd in numbers,' 3; J., alone
genuine, iii. 91; J., Pope's compared with,
87; Lamb, praised by, i. 20 n. 2, 64 n. 2;
L., phrase borrowed by, 37 n. 3 ; ' language
not always pure,' 58 n. 6; Latin poems, 12,
13, 66; • learned puerilities,' 3; learning, 56,
416; lease of queen's lands, 16, 67; letters,
to Arlington, 8; 1. to Sprat, 16; love, only
once in, 6; l., poets must pay some duties to,
6; 1. verses, 6, 7, ii. 202; Love's Riddle, i. 4;
loyalty, 5, 9, 11, 13; 'melancholy,' 14;
metaphysical poet, criticized as, 19-35; m. p.,
best and last of the race, 35; Milton borrows
from him, 58; M., favourite poet with, 56,
154; mind capacious and replenished by
study, 55; Miscellanies, 35-9; mixed wit,'
41; mother's solicitation, 2, 3;

- Mistress,
published, 6; 'airy nothing,' 7; conceits, 41;
no lover will commend it, 40; 'plays round
the head,' 42; passage borrowed from Donne,
57 ; Preface, 6; Motto, 35 n. 2 ; Muse,
45, 46; Naufragium Joculare, 4; neglected
in eighteenth century, 18 n. 2, 214 n. 2;
Nemean Ode, 43; noble lines, 59; Ode on
Wit, 36; Ode upon His Majesty's Restora-
tion, 13; Odes'imparted to English numbers,'
64; Oldham's lines on him, 13 n. 4; Olympic
Ode, 43, 44; Oxford, sheltered at St. John's
College, 5; O., doctor of physic at, II;
pathetic, never, 56; philosophical allusions,
285 n. 1; Pindaric Odes, 42-8, ii. 32 ;
Poems, 1656 edition, i. 9; 'poesy,' defines,
6 n. 8; Poetical Blossoms, 3 n. 6, 4 n. I;
Pope borrows from him, 39 n. 2; P., com-
pared with, 40 n. 2; P.'s Imit. Hor. Epis.
18 n. 2; P.'s Windsor Forest, 17 n. 7;
posthumous fame, poet's happiness in, 10

. 2; praised and neglected too much, 18;
Prefaces, 38 ; 'profane and lascivious verses,'
42; Puritan and Papist, 5; pursues thoughts
to last ramifications, 45; Pyramus and
Thisbe, 4; Reason, 38; Rehearsal, helps in,
282 ; 'representative versification,' 61; re-
publicans and Oliverians,' speaks for, 9 n. 4;
retirement, wish for, 10; retires to country,
15, 16 n. 5; rhymes, on unimportant words,
60; Rochester's epigram, 18 n. 2, 221 n. 3 ;
R.'s favourite poet, 221; royal correspondence,
conducts, 6; Royal Society, 11; sacred
poetry, 50 11. I; St. Albans, Earl of, be-
friended by, 13 n. 4, 16 ; 'Savoy-missing,'13,
15; Scarborough, Dr., 9, 11 ; Scotch treaty,
8; secretary to Jermyn, 6, 8; 'selection,
negligent or unskilful, 55; sentiments, his
own, 56; 'small house and large garden,'
67 ; Smith imitates him, ii. 12; Spenser,
early delight in, i. 2; Sprat, his friend, editor
and biographer, 1, ii. 33; S.'s Hist. of Royal
Society, 39; see SPRAT; sublime, rarely, i. 56;
Swift's Battle of the Books and Cadenus and

Vanessa, 40 1. 3 ; 'tenderness and innocent
gaiety,' 16 n. 4; translation freed from ser-
vility, 64, 373, 422 ; Trinity College, Cam-
bridge, 4, 5, 65; triplets, 63, 466 n. 4;
Tuke's Adventures of Five Hours, i. 15
n. 2; Verses on the government of Crom-
well

, 63 ; versification, 59-63; weakness on
ill success, 14; Westminster Abbey, 17;
Westminster School, 3, 4, 65; "What he
wrote was all his own,' 56; 'Who now reads
Cowley ?', 18 n. 2; Wood, praised by, 18

quotations, Anacreontiques, 23,
39 n. 4; Coniplaint, 8 n. 1,13 n. 4, 14 n. 5;
Davideis, 26, 27 n. 6, 28 n. I, 29 n. 3, 49
nn., 50, 50 nn., 51 (3), 52 (7), 52 n. 3,
53 (3), 54, 54 n. 2, 58, 60, 61 (3), 62 (5), 354;
Dedication to Love's Riddle, 4 n. 5 ; Dedica-
tion to Naufragium Joculare, 4 n. 7; Mis-
tress, 8 n. 2, 23 n. 2, 23 n. 3, 25 (4), 27 n. 5,
28 n. 2, 29 n. 1, 29 n. 3, 30 (2), 31, 32 (3),
33 (2), 57, 67. ESSAYS IN VERSE AND
PROSE, Claudian's Old Man of Verona, 12
n. 2; The Garden, 12 n. 2, 16 n. 6; Of
Solitude, 16 n. 5; Ode upon Liberty, 60;
Horace Epis., 62. MiscellANIES, Prologue
to the Guardian, 5. n. 1;, Tree of Knowledge,
23; To a Lady who made Poesies for Rings,
24; Friendship in absence, 27 n. 4; Motto,
35 n. 2 ; Of Wit, 36; On the Death of Mr.
William Hervey, 37 nn., 65, 163 n. 5; On
the Death of Mr. Crashaw, 39 n. 2, iii. 329
n. 7; On the Death of Sir Henry Wotton, i.
57 n. 1, ii. 12 n. 5; Use of Reason, i. 38;
In Imitation of Horace, i. 5, 28 n. 4; Ode to
the Royal Society, ii. 39. PINDARIC ODES,
Life and Fame, i. 7 n. 1; To Dr. Scar.
borough, 9 n. 3; Second Olympic, 43, 44; First
Nemean, 44 ; Resurrection, 44 n. 4, 45 n. 1;
Muse, 45, 46; To the New Year, 46; Ode
to Mr. Hobbes, 461 n. 1.
Cowper, Lord Chancellor, ii. 163,164, iii. 19.

Cowper, Mary, Countess, Comedies, ii.
221 n. 5; Congreve and Prince of Wales, 225
n. 2 ; Duchess of Monmouth, 268 n. 2.

CowPER, William, Addison's satire, ii. 125
n. 4; authors and critics, i. 410 n. 6; Black-
more's Creation, ii. 244 11. 1; blank verse,
i. 75 n. 6, 192 n. 8, 200, iii. 238 n. 3 ; b.v.,
superior to Thomson's, 298 n. 7; Dryden and
Pope, 222 n. 6; D.'s genius and carelessness,
i. 464 n. 5; Garth, borrows from, ii.;63 n. 6;
genius, definition of, i. 2 n. 5; God made
the country,' 12 n. 2 ; Gray's letters, iii. 431
n. 7; G.'s sublimity, 439 n. 4; Homer, 110
n. 1, 112 n. 2, 117 n. 3, 275, 276; Johnson on
Lycidas, i. 164 n. 2 ; J. on pastoral poetry, 97

Lives of the Poets, Arbuthnot, the
only man, iii. 273; Collins, only religious
poet, 339 n. 3; Milton, i. 84 n. 1; Watts,
iii. 310 n. 3;

Loss of the Royal George,
i. 434 n. 2 ; Milton's Elegies, translations of,
86 n. 6, 89 nn., 90 n. 7; M.'s Epitaphium
Damonis, 97 n. 9; M.'s fine ear, 191 11. 4;

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n. 9;

by Barke, ib.; Y.'s Life, praised by Boswell,
ib.; Johnson's alterations, ib., 393.

Crofts, William, Lord, Dake of Mon.
mouth in his charge, i, 278 n. 2; embassy to
Poland, 73; Waller's rival in rich match,
252, 278.
CROFTS, Mr., see CROFTS, Lord.
CROMWELL, Elizabeth, the Protector's aunt,

i. 268 n. 7.

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M.'s L'Allegro and Penseroso, 165 n. 3; M.'s
Paradise Lost, written with 'immense labour,'
2 n. 5; terrified by it, 181 n. 5; poets in
lower rank of life, ii. 180 n. 3; Pope's Iliad
and bells of rhyme,' iii. 238 n. 3; P.'s
Letters, 157 n. 3; P., lines on, 248 n. 4;
P.'s mercy to others,' 241 n. 6; P.'s imitators,
248 n. 4; Prior's Alma and Hudibras, ii.
205 n.3; P.'s familiar style,'_211 n. 3; P.'s
Henry and Emma, 203 n. 1; P.'s mythology,
202 n. 9; P.'s Solomon, 206 n. 1 ; religious
poetry, iii. 310 n. 2 ; Rodney' a Methodist,'
330 n. 3 ; Swift's letters, 431 n. 7; Thom-
son's description of nature, 301 n. 1; touch
and retouch, to, secret of good writing,
221 n. 2; translated forty lines a day, 117
Cox, Bessy, ii. 199 n. 4, iii. 274.
CRABB, an Oxford wit, ii. 304 n. I.
CRABBE, Rev. George, composition, best
season for, i. 136 n. 1 ; Wesley's preaching,
39 12. 4.
CRADOCK, Joseph, Dryden's Oedipus, re•
vised, i. 362 n. 5; Milton's Euripides, 154.

CRADOCK, Dr. Zachary, Provost of Eton, i.
274.

CRAGGS, Miss, iii. 76 n. 5.
CRAGGS, James, the younger, Secretary of
State, Addison's death-bed dedication to him,
ii. 118; Fenton, instructed by, 259; Gay,
gives South Sea stock to, 273; old Peter Le
Neve's epitaph on him, iii. 259 n. 4; Pope
and Addison, common friend of, 132; Pope's
Epistle to Addison, 260 n. 2 ; P.'s epitaph,
259; P., offers to procure pension for, 118;
P.'s South Sea stock, 137 n. 2; South Sea
scheme, involved in, 260 n. 1; Tickell re-
commended by Addison to his patronage,
ii. 310; Westminster Abbey, iii. 259, 260

CRAGGS, James, the elder, Postmaster-
General, iii. 259 n. 4, 260 n. 1.

CRAIG, James, the architect, Thomson's
nephew, iii. 281 n. 5.

CRASHAW, Richard, Cowley's Elegy on
him, i. 39; Epitaph on Mr. Ashton, iii. 267
11. 5; Marino, his model, i. 69; "meta-
physical poet,' 68; omitted in Lives of the
Poets, 22 n. 4; 'poet and saint,' 39 n. 2, iii.
329; Pope borrows from him, 267, 269 n. 3;
P.'s criticism, i. 69.

CRAWLEY, Mr. Justice, i. 256, 281.
Creech, Thomas, Dryden and his Horace,
i. 396 ; Juvenal's thirteenth Satire, translated,
447.
CRISP, Sir Nicholas, i. 261, 263.

Critical Review, account of it, iii. 452 n. 2 ;
Lyttelton praised in it, 452, 453 n. 2.
Critics, iii. 91 n. 5.
CROFT, Rev. Sir Herbert, Bart., account of
him, iii. 361 n. 1; Chatterton's papers, ib.;
exchanged bar for church, 393; Family Dis-
courses, 361 n. 1; Young's Life, described

jii. 349.

Cromwell, Henry, 'critic and poet,' ac-
count of him, iii. 92 n. 3; Gay's What d'ye
call it, ii. 271; Pope's correspondence, iii.
92, 93, 145.

CROMWELL, Sir Henry, the Protector's
grandfather, i. 249 n. 4.
CROMWELL, Oliver, Charles II, compared
with, i. 271; commenced monarch,' 115;
Cowley, bespattered by, 11 n. 3; discourses
in cant of the tiines,' 269 ; lucky day, ii. 218;
Milton's Defensio Secunda, i. 118; refuses
the Crown, 270 ; 'versed in ancient history,'
269 ; verses on his death by Waller, Dryden,
and Sprat, 270, 334, 425, ii. 32; Waller,
familiar converse with, 269.
CROMWELL, Richard, i. 125.
CROTCH, Dr. William, ii. 234 n. 2.
CROUNE, William, M.D., iii. 415 n. 8.
CROUSAZ, Jean Pierre de, account of him,
iii. 164, 165; Essay on Man, censured, 164,
167.

CROWNE, John, 'borrowed play,' iii. 314
n. 4; Dryden's jealousy, i. 396 n. 3; D.,
set up against, 370 n. 7; Hierusalem, ib.;
Settle's Empress of Morocco, 342 n. 5.
CRUMPTON, Mr., schoolmaster at Solibul,
CUMBERLAND,

Richard, iii. 443.
CUMBERLAND, William, Duke of, ii. 274.
Curiosa felicitas, iii. 236 n. 1.
CURIOSITY, ii. 113 11. 5, 371 n. 1.
CURLL, Edmund, convicted of publishing
obscene pamphlets, iii. 155 n. 2; industry in
preserving national remains, ib.; Halifax's
Works and Life, ii. 41 n. 1; Key to the
Dunciad, advertised, iii. 146 n. 4; 'new terror
of death,' 155 n. 2; pilloried, ib.; Pope's
Letters, published, 93, 145, 155, 156; Bo's
Sober Advice, 276 ; prosecuted in House of
Lords, 155; Rochester's poems, i. 223 n. 2 ;
Savage and Steele, causes quarrel between, ii.
333 n. 2 ; Young's Works, his edition of, iii.
364, 370.
Cust, Francis Cockayne, K.C., ii. 375 n. 1,
376 n. I, 440.

DACIER, Madame, translation of Homer, iii.
114, 115.
DAGGE, MI., Keeper of Newgate, Bristol,
ii. 420 n. 2, 423, 424 n. 1, 429.
Daily Courant, ii. 385, 386 n. 1.
Daily Journal, ii. 346 n. 1, iii. 146 n. 4.
Daily Post, ii. 346 n. 1, 350 n. 2, 354 n. 2.
Daisied, iii. 434 n. 2.

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