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Whose limbs unburied on the naked shore,
Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore,
Since great Achilles and Arrides strove ;
Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove.

Whose limbs, unburied on the hostile shore,
Devooring dogs and greedy vultures core,
Sicce first Atrides and Achilles strove ;

Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove.
Declare, O Muse, in what ill-fated hour
Sprung the fierce strife, from what offended power?
Latona's son a dire contagion spread,
And heap'd the camp with mountains of the dead
The King of men his reverend priest defy'd,
And for the king's offence the people dy'd.

Declare, o Goddess, what offended Power
Enfiam'd their rege, in that ill'omen'd hour ;

anger fatal, hapless Phæbus himself the dire debate procur'd;

fierce
T' avenge the wrongs his injur’d priest endared
For this the God a dire infection spread,
And heap'd the camp with millions of the dead :
The King of Men the Sacred Sire defy'd,

And for the king's offence the people dy'd.
For Chryses sought with costly gifts to gain
His captive daughter from the Victor's chain ;
Suppliant the venerable Father stands,
Apollo's awful ensigns grace his hands,
By these he begs, and lowly bending down,
Extends the sceptre and the laurel crown.
For Chryses sought by presents to regain

costly gifts to gain
His captive daughter from the Victor's chain ;
Supplian, the veperable Father stands,
Apollo's awful ensigo grac'd his hands,
By these he begs, and lowly bencing down
The golden sceptre and the laurel crown,
Presents the sceptre
For these as ensigns of his God he bare,

I be God that sends his golden shaft: afar ;
The low on earth, the vencrable man,

Suppliant before the brother king's began.
He sued to all, but chief implored for grace.
The brother kings of Atreus' royal race ;
Ye kings and warriours may your vows be crown'd,
And Troy's proud walls lie level with the ground ;

May

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May Jove restore you, when your toils are o'er,
Safe to the pleasures of your native shore.

To all he sued, but chief implor'd for grace
The brother kings of Acreus' royal race,
Ye sons of Atreus, may your vows be crown'd,

Kings and warriors
Your labours, by the Gods be all your labours crown'd;
So may the Gods your arms with conquest bless,
And Troy's proud walls lie level with the ground;
Till

laid
And crown your labours with desero'd success ;
May Jove restore you, when your coils are o'er,

Safe to the pleasures of your native shore.
But, oh! relieve a wretched parent's pain,
And give Chryseis to these arms again ;
If mercy fail, yet let my present move,

1
And dread avenging Phæbus, son of Jove.

But, oh! relieve a hapless parent's pain,
And give my daughter to the e arms again :
Receive my gifts; if mercy fails, yet let my present move,
And fear the God that deals his darts around,

avenging Phæbus, son of Jove.
The Greeks, in shouts, their joint assent declare
The priest to reverence, and release the fair.
Not so Atrides ; he with kingly pride,
Repuls'd the sacred Sire, and thus reply'd.

He said, the Greeks their joint assent declare,
The father said, the gen'rous Greeks relent,
T'accept the ransom, and release the fair :
Revere ibe priest, and speak their joint assent ;
Not so the tyrori, he, with kingly pride,

Atrides,
Repulsid the sacred Sire, and thus reply'd

(Not so the tyrant. DRYDEN.) Of these lines, and of the whole first book, I am told that there was yet a former copy, more varied, and more deformed with interlineations.

The beginning of the second book varies very little from the printed page, and is therefore set down without any parallel; the few differences do not require to be elaborately displayed.

Now pleasing sleep had seald each mortal eye ;
Stretch'd in their tents the Grecian leaders lie ;
Th'Immortals slumber'd on their thrones above,
All but the ever watchful eye of Jove.
To honour Theri' son he bends his care,
And plunge the Greeks in all the woes of war.
3 U 2

Then

Then bids an empty phantom rise to sight,
And thus commands the vision of the night :

directs
Fly bence, delusive dream, and, light as air,
To Agamemnon's royal tent repair ;
Bid him in arms draw forth th' embattled train,
March all his legions to the dusty plain.
Now tell the King 'tis given him to destroy
Declare ev'n now
The lofty walls of wide extended Troy ;

tow'rs
For now no more the Gods with Fate contend ;
At Juno's suit the heavenly factions end.
Destruction hovers o'er yon devoted wall,

hangs
And nodding Ilium waits th’ impending fall,

Invocation to the Catalogue of Ships.
Say, Virgins, seated round the throne divine,
All-knowing Goddesses ! immortal Nine !
Since earth's wide regions, heaven's unmeasured height:
And hell's abyss, bide nothing from your sight,
(We wretched mortals! lost in doubts below,
But guess by rumour, and bụt boast we know)
Oh say what heroes, fir'd by thirst of fame,
Or urg'd by wrongs, to Troy's destruction came !
To count them all demands a thousand tongues,
A throat of brass and adamantine lungs.

Now, Virgin God desses, immortal Nine !
That round Olympus' heavenly summit shine,
Who see through heaven and earth, and hell profound,
And all things know, and all things can resound;
Relate what armies sought the Trojan land,
What nations follow'd, and what chiefs command;
(For doubeful Fame distraets mankind below,
And nothing can we tell, and nothing know)
Without your aid, to count th' unnumbered train,
A thousand mouchs, a chousand tongues were vain.

Book V. 2. I.
But Pallas now Tydides' soul inspires,
Fills with her force, and warms with all her fires :
Above the Greeks his deathless fame to raise,
And crown her hero with distinguish'd praise,
High on his helm celestial lightnings play,
His beamy shield emits a living ray ;

Tb

Th’unwearied blaze incessant streams supplies,
Like the red star that fires th' autumnal skies.

But Pallas now Tydides' soul inspires,
Fills with her rage, and warms with all her fires;

force,
O'er all the Greeks decrees his fame to raise,
Above the Greeks her warrior's fame to praise,

his deathless And crown her hero with immortal praise;

distinguish'a
Bright from his beamy crest the lightnings play,
High on

helm
From his broad buckler flash'd the living ray,
High on his helm celestial lightnings play,
His beamy shield emits a living ray,
The Goddess with her breath the fame supplies,
Bright as the stars whose fires in Autumn rise;
Her breath divine thick streaming flames supplies,
Bright as the stars that fires the autumnal skies;
Th' unwearied blaze incessant streams supplies,
Like the red star that fires th' autumnal skies.

When first he rears his radiant orb to sight,
And bath'd in ocean shoots a keener light.
Such glories Pallas on the chief bestow'd,
Such from his arms the fierce effulgence flow.d;-
Onward she drives him furious to engage,
Where the fight burns, and where the thickest rage.

When fresh he rears his radiant orb to sight,
And gilds old Ocean with a blaze of light,
· Bright as the star that fires th' autumnal skies,
Fresh from the deep, and gilds the seas and skies,
Such glories Pallas on her chief be tow'd,
Such sparkling rays from his bright armour flow'd,
Such from his arms the fierce effulgence flow'd,
Onward she drives him headlong to engage,

furious
Where the war bleeds, and where the fiercest rage.
fight burns,

thickest
The sons of Dares first the combat sought.
A wealthy priest, but rich without a fault;
In Vulcan's fane the father's days were led,
The sons to toils of glorious battle br. d;

There lived a Trojar-Dares was his name,
The priest of Vulcan, rich, set void of blame ;
The sons of Dares first the combat sought,
A wealthy priest, but rich without a fault.

Conslusion

Conclusion of Book VIII. 2. 687.

As when the moon, refulgent lamp of night,
O'er heaven's clear azure spreads her sacred light ;
When not a breath disturbs the deep serene,
And not

cloud o'ercasts the solemn scene;
Around her throne the vivid planets roll,
And stars unnumber'd gild the glowing pole :
O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed,
And tip with silver every mountain's head :
Then shine the vales--the rocks in prospect rise,
A flood of glory bursts from all the skies;
The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight,
Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.
So many flames before proud Ilion blaze,
And lighten glimmering, Xanthus with their rays ;
The long reflection of the distant fires
Gleam on the walls, and tremble on the spires :
A thousand piles the dusky horrors gild,
And shoot a shady lustre o'er the field;
Fall fifty guards each flaming pile attend,
Whose umber'd arms by fits thick flashes send;
Loud neigh the coursers o'er their heaps of corn,
And ardent warriors wait the rising morn.

As when in stillness of the silent night,
As when the moon in all her lustre bright,
As when the moon, refulgent lamp of night,
O'er heaven's clear azure sheds her silver light;

pure spreads sacred
As still in air the trembling lustre stood,
And o'er its golden border shoots a food;
When no loose gale disturbs the deep serene,

not a breath
And no dim cloud o'ercasts the solemn scene;

not a

Around her silver throne the planets glow,
And stars unnumber'd trembling beams bestow;
Around her throne che vivid planets roll,
And stars uonumber'd gild the glowing pole:
Clear gleams of light o'er the dark trees are seen,

o'er the dark trees a yellow sheds, O'er the dark trees a yellower green they shed,

gleam

verdure
Aad tip with silver all the mountain heads

forest
And tip with silver every mountain's head.
The vallies open, and the forests rise,
The yales appear, the rocks in prospect rise,

Then

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