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an annual tonnage movement in excess of 15,000,000 tons can be moved over the Big Sandy, its Levisa and Tug Forks, if the proposed channel improvement is made.

In closing, may I again emphasize that this statement is based upon facts and conclusions arrived at from years of practical experience, and the knowledge gained therefrom. I am convinced that a tonnage movement in excess of the required tonnage to justify the improvement, as set forth in the district engineer's report, can be successfully transported over the proposed improved channel. I am also positive that the per-ton cost for the tonnage moved will not exceed my estimated cost of 24 cents per net ton previously stated herein and, in all probability may be less than 24 cents per net ton. Finally, I wish to again emphasize my previous statement to the effect that the single-locking tow units, consisting of a towboat capable of developing 600 delivered horsepower, and four standard 195- by 35- by 11-foot barges, or their equivalent, can be safely and effectively handled upon the proposed improved channel.

Added to these closing conclusions, I respectfully submit to your honorable Board, from the viewpoint of a practical towboat operator, one who has had the benefit of practical boat operation experience on the Big Sandy River, that, from the viewpoint of towboat operation and added thereto the economic benefits that would naturally follow, volume tonnage that could be moved, and for the com. mercial welfare of the Big Sandy Valley, plus the national benefit that will be accorded therefrom, the proposed channel improvement should be approved and authorized. Respectfully submitted.

ÇAPT. Thomas VAUGHAN.

RESOLUTIONS OF THE Pilot's Association of Point PLEASANT, W. Va. Whereas the Pilot's Association of Point Pleasant is deeply interested in the entire inland waterways system of the United States and, more particularly in the industrial welfare and growth of the tri-State area extending from Point Pleasant, W. Va., to Portsmouth, Ohio, on the Ohio River;

And whereas the membership of this association is made up of pilots whose duty it is to handle the large tows passing up and down the Ohio River and the Kanawha River through this district. Its entire membership is river-minded and keenly interested in the welfare of the inland waterways and proposed extensions and improvements thereof;

And whereas the entire Big Sandy Valley lies within the tri-State trade area and its interests are vital to the interests of the membership of this association;

And whereas, from long years of contact and association with the United States Corps of Engineers, the entire membership of this association have come to have great confidence in and respect for the work of this organization;

And whereas the said United States Engineers Corps through its various divisions and subdivisions, over a period of 5 years and at an expense of $400,000, have made an exhaustive study of the Big Sandy waterways project terminating at Catlettsburg, Ky., in the midst of the tri-State area;

And whereas the said United States Engineer Corps, the United States Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, and the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army have all approved the immediate construction of the Big Sandy waterway project at an estimated cost of $82,300,000, and have assigned to it an economic ratio of 1:00 to 1:60 which is an unusually high rating: Now, therefon be it

Resolved, That the Pilot's Association of Point Pleasant, concurs with the United States Corps of Engineers and affiliated bodies and approves the Big Sandy waterway project and urges its early construction; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent to the United States district engineer of Huntington, W. Va., the Chief of Engineers, United States Arm, Washington, D. C., Hon. William M. Whittington, chairman of the Public Works Committee of the blouse of Representatives, Hon. Henry D. Larcade, Jr., chairman of the Rivers and Harbors Subcommittee of the Committee on Public Works, House of Representatives, and Hon. M. G. Burnsides, House of Representatives.

THE Pilot's AssociaTION OF POINT

PLEASANT, W. Va.,

John R. DOUGLASS, President. Attest:

W. A. Johnson, Secretary.

PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS OF THE PROPELLER CLUB, OF THE UNITED STATES,

PORT OF HUNTINGTON, W. VA. Whereas the Propeller Club of the United States, port of Huntington, is deeply interested in the entire inland waterways system of the United States and, in the industrial welfare and growth of the tri-State area extending from Point Pleasant, W. Va., to Portsmouth, Ohio, on the Ohio River.

And whereas its membership is very largely made up of pilots, masters, managers, owners, and builders, and other personnel operating on or along the Ohio River and its tributaries. Its entire membership is river-minded and keenly interested in the welfare of the inland waterways and proposed extensions and improvements thereof.

And whereas the entire Big Sandy Valley lies within the tri-State trade area and its interests are vital to the interests of the membership of this club.

And whereas, from long years of contact and association with the United States Corps of Engineers the entire membership of this club have come to have great confidence in and respect for the work of this organization.

And whereas the said United States Engineer Corps through its various divisions and subdivisions, over a period of 5 years and at an expense of $400,000, have made an exhaustive study of the Big Sandy waterways project terminating at Catlettsburg, Ky., in the midst of the tri-State area.

And whereas the said United States Engineer Corps, the United States Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, and the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army have all approved the immediate construction of the Big Sandy waterway project at an estimated cost of $82,300,000 and have assigned to it an economic ratio of 1.00 to 1.60 which is an usually high rating; now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Propeller Club of the United States, Port of Huntington, concurs with the United States Corps of Engineers and affiliated bodies and approves the Big Sandy waterway project and urges its early construction; and, be it further

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent to the United States district engineer of Huntington, W. Va., the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, Washington, D. C., Hon. Homer D. Angell, chairman of the Rivers and Harbors Subcommittee of the Public Works Committee of the House of Representatives, Senator George W. Malone, chairman of the Rivers and Harbors Subcommittee of the Public Works Committee of the Senate, and Gov. Earle C. Clements of Kentucky, Gov. Clarence W. Meadows of West Virginia, and Gov. Thomas J. Herbert of Ohio.

A. C. GELWICKS, President. Attest:

Paul S. Thomos, Secretary. Senator HOLLAND. Is there anything else?

Mr. GOLDEN. I have been listening to the evidence, and it all seems to have been downstream work.

Senator HOLLAND. Maybe the upstream fellows have not had their say yet.

Mr. GOLDEN. I would like to tell a little of my personal experience upstream.

Senator HOLLAND. All right, sir,

Mr. Golden. I lost quite a bit of money on upstream work because of not having water. I had a 200-horsepower boat. I was going in on a 1,500-acre lease on coal lands on Tug Fork and Levisa just above Louisa. I saw no way out of it to handle it just on an open river. I dropped it. I turned down one job to go with sand and gravel to that trail around Louisa. That would have been 10 miles above and 10 below, two landings. It would have amounted to about 300 to 1,000 tons.

Senator HOLLAND. You were not able to accept those offers of business because of the bad condition of the river?

Mr. GOLDEN. That is it. I turned down one job that went into Paintsville on steel and concrete. It was the State Highway Department up there.

Senator HOLLAND. That is on the Levisa ?

Mr. GOLDEN. Yes; at the rate we figured it would have amounted to about $8,000. We had to turn it down.

Senator WITHERS. That is one little incident.
Mr. GOLDEN. Yes.

Senator WITHERS. Is there anything else you wanted to say, Captain?

Mr. Golden. I turned down a boat load of automobiles,

Senator HOLLAND. In other words, your point is that there are numerous contracts you have been offered but which you could not accept because of the unsatisfactory condition of the river?

Mr. Golden. If I could have had the water, I could have had that work, but I did not have the water.

Senator WITHERS. Is there anything else you want to say?

Mr. GOLDEN. There are different jobs, but there is no need of going over all of them.

Senator WITHERS. There are other jobs besides those you have enumerated?

Mr. Golden. Yes; I had to give them up on account of the condition of the water.

Senator HOLLAND. Thank you very much.
Mr. Golden. Thank you, sir.
Senator HOLLAND. Who is the next witness?
Senator WITHERS. Thadeus Scott.

STATEMENT OF THADEUS SCOTT, PIKEVILLE, KY. Mr. Scott. Mr. Chairman, my name is Thadeus Scott, from Pikeville, Ky. I am a coal operator and a member of the Big Sandy Coal Association. I filed my statement before the House committee.

Senator HOLLAND. Is there anything you want to add to the statement you made before the House Committee, Mr. Scott?

Mr. Scott. Nothing, except about in-going traffic up there. If we had river transportation, there is an awful lot of business that could be shipped by water.

Senator WITHERS. Do you have any figures on that, Mr. Scott?

Mr. Scott. Nothing, only business connections. There are an awful lot of automobiles brought up through the valley. They can be brought by water a third cheaper than by rail.

Senator WITHERS. What about your coal?

Mr. Scott. The coal shipment, the out-going coal shipment could be made and shipped much cheaper by water, as they have already stated.

Senator WITHERS. Are you speaking of the traffic that would come in? You are just showing that the boats would not return empty; is that it?

Mr. Scott. That is what I am trying to bring out. It would not be a one-way traffic. It would be a two-way pay on the river.

Senator WITHERS. Merchandise could be shipped in from Louisville and Cincinnati?

Mr. Scott. That is right.
Senator WITHERS. All the points on the river?

Mr. Scott. Yes, sir. At Pikeville we have an awfully large freight depot, and that could be taken care of by water and save the merchants an awful lot of money.

Senator HOLLAND. How big a town is Pikeville?

Mr. Scott. Pikeville has a population of around 8,500, and it is one of the largest counties in Kentucky.

Senator WITHERS. It is the largest.
Mr. Scott. That is right.

Senator WITHERS. What other towns are there up the Levisa and the Tug and Big Sandy besides Pikeville?

Mr. Scott. Starting at Catlettsburg, the principal towns would be Louisa, Prestonburg, Allen, which is an awfully large business center and transports an awful lot of coal. I missed Paintsville in there.

Senator WITHERS. What size place is Paintsville?
Mr. SCOTT. Around 9,000 or 9,500.

Senator WITHERS. Is there a good deal of timber in the mountains there?

Mr. Scott. Yes; there is an awful lot of timber.
Senator WITHERS. Do you have limestone rock up there?

Mr. Scott. There is plenty and there are other minerals that I am not acquainted with to mention. I have heard them spoken of.

Senator WITHERS. Do you know anything about the iron ore deposits?

Mr. Scott. I have been told there are great amounts of iron ore deposits in our county and in the area around there.

Senator WITHERS. I think that is all.

Mr. Scott. I have statements here from other coal operators that I would like to file.

Senator HOLLAND. By whom, please, sir? Just list them and we will admit them.

Mr. Scott. By Virginia-Frances Elkhorn Coal Co., of Martin, Ky.

Senator HOLLAND. It will be admitted.
Senator Withers. That is one of your large coal companies?

Mr. Scott. They are a large coal producer. This is from the Lawco Coal Co., of Ashland, Ky.

Senator HOLLAND. All right; it is admitted.
Mr. SCOTT. Acme Elkhorn Coal Co., of Martin, Ky.
Senator HOLLAND. It is admitted.
Mr. Scott. The Gilley Elkhorn Coal Co., of Martin, Ky.
Senator HOLLAND. It is admitted.
(The documents referred to above are as follows:)

MARTIN, Ky. SENATE Public Works COMMITTEE,

Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: I own and operate several coal mines in Floyd County, Ky. In the last 8 months my mines have been operating at less than 60 percent of capacity and it is my belief that if the Big Sandy River were canalized my mines would operate at full capacity.

Because my mines are expensive to operate, and the fact that the mines on the Kanawha River are able to deliver their coals to my customers at about $1.50 per ton less than I can due to the saving in freight, it is my opinion that all the coal operators in the Big Sandy Valley are facing the same problem that I am.

I urgently request that you give favorable consideration to the proposed ranalization of the Big Sandy River. Yours very truly,

GILLEY ELKHORN Coal Co.,' By CHARLES GILLEY, Manager.

MARTIN, Ky, July 8, 1949. Mr. VIRGIL CHAPMAN,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR SENATOR CHAPMAN: We are very much interested in the canalization of the Big Sandy River's tributaries—Levisa Fork and Tug River Fork. The canalization of the Levisa Fork would afford us with cheaper transportation for our coal and enable us to compete with other fields which now have water transportation. We have only one means of transportation and suffer a penaltyor, as the railroad calls it a differential-so severe we cannot compete in price.

We trust that you will do everything in your power in our behalf as well as the people of the Big Sandy Valley. Thanking you, we are Very truly yours,

ACME ELKHORN COAL Co., By R. M. Hall, Partner.

Lawco Coal Co.,

Ashland, Ky., July 9, 1949. Dr. W. O. THOMPSON, Chairman, Big Sandy Improvement Association,

Pikeville, Ky. DEAR MR. THOMPSON: I have noted your good work in behalf of the proposed canalization of the Big Sandy and Tug River—and wish to bring up a point that I think has been more or less overlooked. This is the huge possible tonnage of strip coal that would, without doubt, come out of these valleys if river traffic were provided.

The writer has been stripping in the Ashland, Ky., and Louisa, Ky., areas, and has shipped well over one-half million tons of coal from these areas in the past several years.

Had the Louisa, Ky., area stripping project been favored with water traffic that operation would still be running. I have considered a number of other projects in the Big Sandy field, but lack of loading facilities and high freight rates have been the deciding negative influence in each proposal.

I might emphasize here that the tonnage of strip coal that would come out of the Big Sandy area alone would be immense if canalization were provided. I would estimate it from what I have seen, and what I have heard from others that have viewed the field, that this area would ship at least 7,000,000 tons a year. That figure might be multiplied as it is most conservative.

Stripping is a fast coal-removal operation, and the majority of the coal removed in this area would be coal that would possibly never be mined. This is possible because the strip coal is taken out at a faster rate, and lower cost. Because of this it can be sent to distant power plants and huge users of other types, and sold on a B. t. u. basis. This, if transportation rates are not too high. The coal ordinarily comes from a top seam of not too good a grade. The grade of this coal, its height, lack of a good top, etc., often make the possibility of mining it a border-line or impossible project.

It is my honest opinion that the strip coal alone that might be removed from the Big Sandy and Tug River areas, coal that might possibly never be removed by ordinary mining methods, could easily pay for the project over a conservative number of years. This for your general information. Sincerely,

LAWCO Coal Co., By: Chas. E. YATES.

VIRGINIA-FRANCES ELKHORN COAL Co.,

Martin, Ky., July 8, 1949. Hon. VIRGIL CHAPMAN,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR SENATOR CHAPMAN: We have been advised that the Big Sandy Valley Association will ask the Senate Committee on Public Works to consider canalization of the Levisa Fork and Tug River Fork of the Big Sandy River.

The experience of this company in competing markets with coal from the West Virginia fields has been unfavorable. We cannot get our coal to the market without paying excessive freight rates and the West Virginia field enjoys water transportation as well as cheaper freight (rail) rates. We feel that if we were afforded water transportation we would be able to compete and give our employees

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