The History of England from the Earliest Times to the Death of George the Second

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H. Fisher, Son & Company, 1825 - Great Britain - 716 pages

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Page 198 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my gray hairs.
Page 204 - But if you have already determined of me,* and that not only my death, but an infamous slander must bring you the...
Page 203 - But let not your grace ever imagine, that your poor wife will ever be brought to acknowledge a fault where not so much as a thought thereof preceded.
Page 451 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 306 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 204 - ... of mine enemies, withdraw your princely favour from me; neither let that stain, that unworthy stain, of a disloyal heart towards your good grace, ever cast so foul a blot on your most dutiful wife, and the infant princess your daughter.
Page 204 - ... and conscience satisfied, the ignominy and slander of the world stopped, or my guilt openly declared. So that whatsoever God or you may determine of me, your Grace may be freed from an open censure, and mine offence being...
Page 204 - My last and only request shall be, that myself may only bear the burden of your Grace's displeasure, and that it may not touch the innocent souls of those poor gentlemen who, as I understand, are likewise in strait imprisonment for my sake. If ever I have found favour in your sight, if ever the name of Anne Boleyn hath been pleasing in your ears, then let me obtain this request...
Page 164 - Margaret, flying with her son into a forest, where she endeavoured to conceal herself, was beset, during the darkness of the night, by robbers, who, either ignorant or regardless of her quality, despoiled her of her rings and jewels, and treated her with the utmost indignity.
Page 306 - For shame," said he to the Parliament, "get you gone; give place to honester men, to those who will more faithfully discharge their trust. You are no longer a Parliament : I tell you, you are no longer a Parliament. The Lord has done with you : he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work.

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