Strangeness and Beauty: Volume 1, Ruskin to Swinburne: An Anthology of Aesthetic Criticism 1840-1910

Front Cover
Eric Warner, Graham Hough
CUP Archive, Apr 7, 1983 - Literary Criticism - 297 pages
This is a two-volume anthology of criticism of art and literature from approximately 1840 to 1910. The central purpose of the anthology is to show how Romantic ideas of art and imagination were transformed by a number of writers in the nineteenth century and became the fundamental premisses of modernist aesthetics. Volume 1 begins with the development of the Romantic idea of the artist-critic as preacher in the work of Ruskin, whose aim was very much that of this Romantic forebears, Blake and Wordsworth: to awaken humanity to a greater spiritual perception. The volume also concerns itself with the transformation of this in works such as Arthur Hallam's essay on his friend Tennyson, which is central to the writing of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, and with the development of French Romanticism into the influential aesthetic movement of Symbolism in the work of Gautier and Baudelaire. The volumes comprise general introductions and introduction to individual extracts, full annotation and helpful guides to further reading.
 

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Contents

Diaphaneitè
9
From The Child in the House
33
Prosper Mérimée
68
GEORGE MOORE 18521933
90
OSCAR WILDE 18541900
121
WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS 18651939
158
What is Popular Poetry?
176
Magic
187
The Philosophy of Shelleys Poetry
193
ARTHUR SYMONS 18651945
210
II
225
IV
259
Notes
273
Guide to further reading
300
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