Half-hours in Southern History

Front Cover
B. F. Johnson publishing Company, 1907 - Confederate States of America - 320 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 196 - Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right — a right which, we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.
Page 190 - State to interpose its authority for their protection in the manner best calculated to secure that end. When emergencies occur which are either beyond the reach of the judicial tribunals, or too pressing to admit of the delay incident to their forms, States which have no common umpire must be their own judges, and execute their own decisions.
Page 183 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion, that, if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation; amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Page 59 - I'll give thee this plague for thy dowry : be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.
Page 186 - Nay : we hold, with Jefferson, to the inalienable right of communities to alter or abolish forms of government that have become oppressive or injurious ; and, if the Cotton States shall decide that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace. The right to secede may be a revolutionary one, but it exists nevertheless...
Page 196 - Nor is this right confined to cases in which the whole people of an existing government, may choose to exercise it. Any portion of such people that can, may revolutionize, and make their own so much of the territory as they inhabit.
Page 252 - tis gory, Yet 'tis wreathed around with glory, And 'twill live in song and story Though its folds are in the dust: For its fame on brightest pages Penned by poets and by sages, Shall go sounding down the ages Furl its folds though now we must.
Page 304 - Ephraim shall not envy Judah, and Judah "shall not vex Ephraim...
Page 145 - There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream. It is not now as it hath been of yore; — Turn wheresoe'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more.
Page 19 - Give us back the ties of Yorktown, Perish all the modern hates, Let us stand together, brothers, In defiance of the Fates, For the safety of the Union Is the safety of the States.

Bibliographic information