Easy Star Lessons

Front Cover
G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1882 - Astronomy - 239 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 177 - Round he surveys, and well might, where he stood So high above the circling canopy Of night's extended shade, from eastern point Of Libra to the fleecy star that bears Andromeda far off Atlantic seas. Beyond the horizon...
Page 27 - Canst thou bind the sweet influences of the Pleiades, Or loose the bands of Orion? Canst thou bring forth Mazzaroth in his season? Or canst thou guide Arcturus with his sons?
Page 70 - Thro' cells of madness, haunts of horror and fear, That I come to be grateful at last for a little thing : My mood is changed, for it fell at a time of year When the face of night is fair on the dewy downs, And the shining daffodil dies, and the Charioteer And starry Gemini hang like glorious crowns Over Orion's grave low down in the west...
Page 213 - And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the bow shall be seen in the cloud: 15 and I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh.
Page 213 - And Noah builded an altar unto the LORD ; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the altar.
Page 4 - Mr. Proctor, of all writers of our time, best conforms to Matthew Arnold's conception of a man of culture, in that he strives to humanise knowledge and divest it of whatever is harsh, crude, or technical, and so makes it a source of happiness and brightness for all.
Page 4 - HALF-HOURS WITH THE TELESCOPE: a Popular Guide to the Use of the Telescope as a means of Amusement and Instruction.
Page 4 - HALF-HOURS WITH THE STARS: a Plain and Easy Guide to the Knowledge of the Constellations. Showing in 12 Maps the position oi the principal Star-Groups night after night throughout the year.
Page 47 - ... Canis Minor being the other ; but we can hardly suppose Lepus was the sole prey pursued by so great a giant and two such fine dogs. The constellation Canis Major is chiefly remarkable for the Dog-star. In old times this star was thought to bring pestilence. Homer speaks of it (not by name, however) as the star " Whose burning breath Taints the red air with fevers, plagues and death.

Bibliographic information