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his own heart flutter with deep emotion. The man said that, while standing alone, a strange and momentary noise had struck upon his ear, coming as if from the apartment within. A suspicion of the truth crossing his mind on the instant, the surgeon opened the door hurriedly, exclaiming, “Why did you not open it?-why did you not send for me ?

On entering the chamber, the suspicion of the anxious surgeon was verified. The body, which had been left with the face upwards, was found turned upon one side, and blood had issued from the mouth! The exertions which at the time had seemed utterly unavailing, had in reality produced an effect upon the body, evidenced, unhappily, when all had retired from the attempt. The spark of life had actually reanimated for an instant the cold frame, while there was none by to nurse and cherish its glimmering ray into vigorous and enduring flame. The renewed endeavours made no impression. The moment of hope had passed, unseen and unprofited, by. What a solemn lesson is this, never, while the shadow of a possibility remains, to cease the endeavour to relight the lamp that has been quenched, for a time only it may be, in the deep waters!

THE BORDER WIDOW.

In the course of that memorable expedition in 1529, when James V. proceeded with an army along the Borders in order to quell the numerous freebooters who kept the country in fear, an incident occurred which forms the subject of traditionary story in Tweeddale. The king, after visiting Polmood and Oliver Castle, on the upper part of the Tweed, crossed the mountain tract on the south, into the vale of the Meggat, and there suddenly environed the castle of Henderland.

This solitary tower was at the time inhabited by Piers Cockburn, one of the most noted marauders in this wild district of country. According to tradition, Piers was sitting at dinner when he was surprised by the king, and without ceremony led out and hanged over the gate of his own castle. While the execution was going forward, his unhappy wife is said to have taken refuge in the recesses of the Dow-glen—a dell formed by a mountain torrent, called the Henderland Burn, which passes near the site of the tower. A place, termed the Lady's Seat, is still shown where she is said to have striven to drown, amid the roar of a foaming cataract, the tumultuous noise which announced the close of her husband's existence.

In a deserted burial-place, which once surrounded the chapel of the castle, the monument of Cockburn is still shown. It is a large stone, broken into three parts; but some armorial bearings may be yet traced; and the following inscription is still legible, though greatly defaced by time—“ Here lyes Perys of Cokburné

and his wyfe Marjory." Latterly, the tomb has been preserved
from obliteration by the good taste of the proprietor, Mr Murray
of Henderland.
On the melancholy incident above related, the

following simple and affecting ballad, the Lament of the Border Widow, was afterwards written :

“My love he built me a bonny bower,
And clad it a'wi' lilye flour;
A brawer bower ye ne'er did see,
Than my true love he built for me.
There came a man, by middle day,
He spied his sport, and went away;
And brought the king that very night,
Who brake my bower, and slew my knight.
He slew my knight, to me sae dear;
He slew my knight, and poined his gear;
My servants all for life did flee,
And left me in extremitie.
I sewed his sheet, making my mane;
I watched the corpse, myself alane ;
I watched his body, night and day;
No living creature came that way.
I took his body on my back,
And whiles I gaed, and whiles I satte;
I digged a grave, and laid him in,
And happed him with the sod sae green.
But thinkna ye my heart was sair,
When I laid the moul' on his yellow hair?
O thinkna ye my heart was wae,
When I turned about, away to gae ?
Nae living man I'll love again,
Since that my lovely knight is slain ;
Wi' ae lock of his yellow hair
I'll chain my heart for evermair.”

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MADAME ROLAND AND THE GIRONDINS.

EDUCATION AND MARRIAGE.

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EANNE MANON PHLIPON was born in Paris, in the year 1756, of cbscure but respectable parents. Her

father, who was an engraver of some talent, was an active and industrious man ; and her mother was a woman of a superior mind, and endowed with most amiable qualities. Manon was, even when a mere child, distinguished for a lively and gentle disposition, great quickness of apprehension, and diligence in her studies. She was not four years of age when she knew how to read; and

from that moment, to supply her with a sufficient quantity of books, was the only necessary care of her parents for the earlier part of her education. Everything which she could lay hold of she read, and that, too, with singular advantage. So absorbed was she when reading, that the only successful method which was found of withdrawing her attention from her books, was by offering her flowers, of which she was passionately fond: indeed, books and flowers continued to the end of her life, even under the most trying circumstances, to afford her exquisite pleasure.

Her great intelligence, and her desire for study, inspired one of her uncles, the Åbbé Bimont, with the idea of teaching her Latin. She eagerly embraced the proposal; but the abbé not having much time to spare, it appears that she did not make great progress in this language. As she grew up, her parents, who were resolved to let her have as good an education as their limited means would permit, had her taught writing, geography, music, and dancing. She also learned drawing; and such was her ardour for study, that she would often rise at five o'clock in the morning, and, although only half-dressed, prepare her lessons and exercises. It may easily be imagined that the progress

which she made was astonishing; and it need hardly be remarked, that she became a great favourite with her teachers, who found almost as much pleasure in imparting knowledge to her, as she did in receiving it from them. But her

and his wyfe Marjory.” Latterly, the tomb has been preserved from obliteration by the good taste of the proprietor, Mr Murray of Henderland.

On the melancholy incident above related, the following simple and affecting ballad, the Lament of the Border Widow, was afterwards written :

“My love he built me a bonny bower,
And clad it a'wi' lilye flour;
A brawer bower ye ne'er did see,
Than my true love he built for me.
There came a man, by middle day,
He spied his sport, and went away;
And brought the king that very night,
Who brake my bower, and slew my knight.
He slew my knight, to me sae dear;
He slew my knight, and poined his gear;
My servants all for life did flee,
And left me in extremitie.
I sewed his sheet, making my mane;
I watched the corpse, myself alane ;
I watched his body, night and day;
No living creature came that way.
I took his body on my back,
And whiles I gaed, and whiles I satte ;
I digged a grave, and laid him in,
And happed him with the sod sae green.
But thinkna ye my heart was sair,
When I laid the moul' on his yellow hair?
O thinkna ye my heart was wae,
When I turned about, away to gae ?
Nae living man I'll love again,
Since that my lovely knight is slain;
Wi' ae lock of his yellow hair
I'll chain my heart for evermair.'

[graphic]

MADAME ROLAND AND THE GIRONDINS.

EDUCATION AND MARRIAGE.

[graphic]

EANNE MANON PHLIPON was born in Paris, in the year 1756, of cbscure but respectable parents. Her

father, who was graver of some talent, was an

active and industrious man ; S and her mother was a woman

of a superior mind, and endowed with most amiable qualities. Manon was, even when a mere child, distinguished for a lively and gentle disposition, great quickness of apprehension, and diligence in her studies. She was not four

years

of
age

when she knew how to read; and

from that moment, to supply her with a sufficient quantity of books, was the only necessary care of her parents for the earlier part of her education. Everything which she could lay hold of she read, and that, too, with singular advantage. So 'absorbed was she when reading, that the only successful method which was found of withdrawing her attention from her books, was by offering her flowers, of which she was passionately fond: indeed, books and flowers continued to the end of her life, even under the most trying circumstances, to afford her exquisite pleasure.

Her great intelligence, and her desire for study, inspired one of her uncles, the Abbé Bimont, with the idea of teaching her Latin. She eagerly embraced the proposal; but the abbé not having much time to spare, it appears that she did not make great progress in this language. As she grew up, her parents, who were resolved to let her have as good an education as their limited means would permit, had her taught writing, geography, music, and dancing. She also learned drawing; and such was her ardour for study, that she would often rise at five o'clock in the morning, and, although only half-dressed, prepare her lessons and exercises. It may easily be imagined that the progress which she made was astonishing; and it need hardly be remarked, that she became a great favourite with her teachers, who found almost as much pleasure in imparting knowledge to her, as she did in receiving it from them. But her

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