The autobiography of William Jerdan, with his literary, political, and social reminiscences and correspondence during the last fifty years, Volume 4

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Page 61 - The spirit that I have seen May be the devil : and the devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, — As he is very potent with such spirits, — Abuses me to damn me: I'll have grounds More relative than this: — the play's the thing Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Page 429 - BARTLETT (WH),— FOOTSTEPS OF OUR LORD AND HIS APOSTLES, in Syria, Greece, and Italy. A succession of Visits to the Scenes of New Testament Narrative. With Twenty-three Steel Engravings, and several Woodcuts. Third Edition, super-royal 8vo. cloth, gilt edges, 124.; morocco elegant, 21s. • FORTY DAYS IN THE DESERT...
Page 46 - Although thy breath be rude. Heigh, ho ! sing, heigh, ho ! unto the green holly : Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly Then, heigh, ho, the holly ! This life is most jolly. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, That dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot : Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remember'd not Heigh, ho ! sing, heigh, ho ! &c.
Page 425 - COLA MONTI ; or, the Story of a Genius. A Tale for Boys. By the Author of "How to win Love.
Page 168 - Farewell to the mountains high cover'd with snow; Farewell to the straths and green valleys below ; Farewell to the forests and wild-hanging woods; Farewell to the torrents and loud-pouring floods.
Page 351 - O, that a man might know The end of this day's business, ere it come ! But it sufficeth, that the day will end, And then the end is known.
Page 439 - Word from the Greek, Latin, Saxon, German, Teutonic, Dutch, French, Spanish, and other Languages ; with their present Acceptation and Pronunciation.
Page 46 - Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude ; Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude.
Page 81 - Tis but an hour ago since it was nine ; And after one hour more 'twill be eleven ; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot ; And thereby hangs a tale.
Page 376 - EVEN such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with age and dust ; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days ; But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust.

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