Feelings of Believing: Psychology, History, Phenomenology

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, Feb 28, 2020 - Philosophy
In Feelings of Believing: Psychology, History, Phenomenology, Ryan Hickerson demonstrates that philosophers as diverse as Hume, Descartes, Husserl, and William James all treated believing as feeling. He argues that doxastic sentimentalism, therefore, is considerably more central to modern epistemology than philosophers have recognized. When the empirical psychology of overconfidence and attention is brought to bear on the history of philosophy and the phenomenology of believing, all point toward belief as fundamentally affective. Understanding believing as feeling has the potential to make us better believers, both by encouraging suspicion of unexamined certainties and by focusing attention on credulity. Hickerson argues that believing is typically felt but not given attention by the believer, and he suggests that virtuous believers are those who pay careful attention to their own sentiments-- who attempt to raise their beliefs to the level of judgments.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Feeling Disbelief
33
2 Feeling Certain and the Circle
61
3 The Psychology of Overconfidence
103
4 The Feeling of SelfEvidence
143
5 Doxasticity as Electricity
189
6 Attention and Feeling Noticed
221
Beliefy Feelings Whence and Whither
265
Bibliography
291
Index
309
About the Author
319
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2020)

Ryan Hickerson, PhD, teaches philosophy at Western Oregon University.

Bibliographic information