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AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1965

U.S. SENATE,
SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON AIR AND WATER POLLUTION
OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 10 a.m., pursuant to recess, in room 4200, Senate Office Building, Senator Edmund S. Muskie (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Present : Senators Muskie, Boggs, and Murphy.
Senator MUSKIE. The committee will be in order.

I would like to say for the record that we had a most interesting and enlightening day in Detroit yesterday.

I must say that we find ourselves in a curious situation. The day before yesterday the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare indicated that although we have a problem that needs to be dealt with we don't have the know-how to deal with it now.

Yesterday in Detroit the testimony of the automobile industry was that there is no problem that needs this kind of action now, but that if there is, the industry does have the know-how to deal with it.

If we can get the two together, we can get some action. Yesterday afternoon, we visited the research laboratories of the Chrysler Corp., General Motors, and Ford Motor Co., and saw their equipment for dealing with tailpipe exhaust installed on automobiles operating

We saw test results and we are confident, as the automobile industry is confident, that it could provide the hardware for the 1968 model year. Whether it could provide it earlier than that is a question that we are still interested in exploring, but at least the industry told us they could provide the hardware for the 1968 model year.

This seems to be a state of fact of which the Department is unaware, or at least was unaware as of the day before yesterday. So it will be interesting to explore the question further.

There will be submitted and will be included in the record by the manufacturers descriptions of what we saw yesterday afternoon, including appropriate illustrations which I think would be useful to those members of the committee who found it impossible to be in Detroit yesterday.

(Information included under April 7, 1965, hearings.)

Senator MUSKIE. We will now go on with our witnesses of the morning. Our first testimony will come from a panel made up of our distinguished gentlemen, Nr. James R. Garvey, president, Bituminous

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Coal Research, Inc., an affiliate of National Coal Association; Mr.
Harry Perry, Director of Coal Research, U.S. Bureau of Mines; Mr.
Curtis G. Cortelyou, American Petroleum Institute, accompanied by
Mr. W. A. Burhouse; and Mr. G. V. Williamson, Edison Electric
Institute and vice president of the Union Electric Co., of Missouri.

Gentlemen, will you please come forward. I understand you all
have prepared statements.
Why don't you present your statements in the order in which I just

SE DE announced you. Would it be helpful if all the statements were presented at once or would you mind being interrupted as you proceed ! I take it either course would be satisfactory. All right, we will play it as we go along

Mr. Garvey, then, would you proceed?
STATEMENTS OF JAMES R. GARVEY, PRESIDENT, BITUMINOUS COAL

RESEARCH, INC., AN AFFILIATE OF NATIONAL COAL ASSOCIA-
TION; HARRY PERRY, DIRECTOR OF COAL RESEARCH, U.S. BU-
REAU OF MINES; AND CURTIS V. CORTELYOU, AMERICAN PETRO-
UEUM INSTITUTE, ACCOMPANIED BY W. A. BURHOUSE; AND G. V.
WILLIAMSON, EDISON ELECTRIC INSTITUTE AND VICE PRESI-
DENT OF UNION ELECTRIC CO., OF MISSOURI

Mr. Garvey. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, my name is James R. Garvey. I am president and director of research of Bituminous Coal Research, Inc., with offices and laboratory at Monroeville, Pa. BCR is an affiliate of the National Coal Association, which has offices here in Washington, D.C., and through this affiliation serves as the research agency for the bituminous coal industry.

I have a prepared statement which I would like to preface by saying that sulfur dioxide plays only a part in the complete overall problem of air pollution.

The combustion of industrial fuels and particularly coal has traditionally received an unjustified amount of blame for air pollutionor at least it did until Los Angeles graphically demonstrated that air pollution problems can be traced in large part to other sources.

Nevertheless, the coal industry, its major customers and the Government have all been working to minimize emissions from coal-burning powerplants, even though these constitute only a part of the total air pollution problem.

We at Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. have been working on sulfur dioxide removal just as we did in developing methods to reduce the emission of smoke and fly ash.

I should point out, however, that there is a serious question as to the point at which sulfur dioxide affects human beings. On on hand, the leading organization of industrial hygienists sets the threshold for prolonged exposure at five parts of sulfur dioxide per million parts of

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