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the activity's reasons for denying the amendment request.

(2) The statement of reasons shall contain only those reasons given to the individual by the appellate official and shall not contain any comments on the individual's statement of disagreement.

(3) At the discretion of the naval activity, the statement of reasons may be disclosed to those individuals, activities, and agencies that receive the statement of disagreement.

$ 701.111 Privacy Act appeals.

(a) How to file an appeal. The following guidelines shall be followed by individuals wishing to appeal a denial of notification, access, or amendment of records.

(1) The appeal must be received by the cognizant review authority (i.e., ASN (M&RA), NJAG, OGC, or OPM) within 60 calendar days of the date of the response.

(2) The appeal must be in writing and requesters should provide a copy of the denial letter and a statement of their reasons for seeking review.

(b) Time of receipt. The time limits for responding to an appeal

an appeal commence when the appeal reaches the office of the review authority having jurisdiction over the record. Misdirected appeals should be referred expeditiously to the proper review authority.

(c) Review authorities. ASN (M&RA), NJAG, and OGC are authorized to adjudicate appeals made to SECNAV. NJAG and OGC are further authorized to delegate this authority to a designated Assistant NJAG and the Principal Deputy General or Deputy General Counsel, respectively, under such terms and conditions as they deem appropriate.

(1) If the record is from a civilian Official Personnel Folder or is contained on any other OPM forms, send the appeal to the Assistant Director for Workforce Information, Personnel Systems and Oversight Group, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20415. Records in all systems of records maintained in accordance with the OPM governmentwide systems notices are only in the temporary custody of the Department of the Navy.

(2) If the record pertains to the employment of a present or former Navy and Marine Corps civilian employee, such as Navy or Marine Corps civilian personnel records or an employee's grievance or appeal file, to the General Counsel, Navy Department, Washington, DC 20360-5110.

(3) If the record pertains to a present or former military member's fitness reports or performance evaluations to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs), Navy Department, Washington, DC 20350– 1000.

(4) All other records dealing with present or former military members to the Judge Advocate General, Navy Department, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 22332-2400.

(d) Appeal procedures. (1) If the appeal is granted, the review authority shall advise the individual that his or her appeal has been granted and provide access to the record being sought.

(2) If the appeal is denied totally or in part, the appellate authority shall advise the reason(s) for denying the appeal, citing the appropriate subsections of 5 U.S.C. 552a or this subpart and subpart G of this part that apply; the date of the appeal determination; the name, title, and signature of the appellate authority; and a statement informing the requester of his or her right to seek judicial relief in the Federal District Court.

(e) Final action, time limits and documentation. (1) The written appeal notification granting or denying access is the final naval activity action on the initial request for access.

(2) All appeals shall be processed within 30 working days of receipt, unless the appellate authority finds that an adequate review cannot be completed within that period. If additional time is needed, notify the applicant in writing, explaining the reason for the delay and when the appeal will be completed.

(f) Denial of appeal by activity's failure to act. An individual may consider his or her appeal denied if the appellate authority fails to:

(1) Take final action on the appeal within 30 working days of receipt when no extension of time notice was given;

or

(2) Take final action within the period established by the notice to the appellate authority of the need for an extension of time to complete action on the appeal.

8701.112 Disclosure of records.

(a) Conditions of disclosure. (1) 5 U.S.C. 552a prohibits an agency from disclosing any record contained in a system of records to any person or agency, except when the record subject gives written consent for the disclosure or when one of the 12 conditions listed below in this subsection applies.

(2) Except for disclosures made under 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988) as amended by the Freedom of Information Reform Act of 1986 and Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E, “Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act Program, before disclosing any record from a system of records to any recipient other than a Federal agency, make reasonable efforts to ensure the record is accurate, relevant, timely, and complete for Department of the Navy purposes. Records discovered to have been improperly filed in the system of records should be removed before disclosure.

(i) If validation cannot be obtained from the record itself, the naval activity may contact the record subject (if reasonably available) to verify the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, and relevancy of the information.

(ii) If validation cannot be obtained from the record and the record subject is not reasonably available, advise the recipient that the information is believed to be valid as of a specific date and reveal any factors bearing on the validity of the information.

(b) Nonconsensual disclosures. 5 U.S.C. 552a provides 12 instances when a record in a system of records may be disclosed without the written consent of the record subject:

(1) Disclosures within the Department of Defense. For purposes of disclosing records, the Department of Defense is considered a single agency; hence, a record may be disclosed to any officer or employee in the Department of Defense (including private contractor personnel who are engaged to perform services needed in connection with the operation of a system of records for a DoD component), who have a need for

the record in the performance of their duties, provided this use is compatible with the purpose for which the record is maintained. This provision is based on the "need to know' concept.

(1) For example, this may include disclosure to personnel managers, review boards, discipline officers, courts-martial personnel, medical officers, investigating officers, and representatives of the Judge Advocate General, Auditor General, Naval Inspector General, or the Naval Investigative Service, who require the information in order to discharge their official duties. Examples of personnel outside the Department of the Navy who may be included are: Personnel of the Joint Staff, Armed Forces Entrance and Examining Stations, Defense Investigative Service, or the other military departments, who require the information in order to discharge an official duty.

(ii) It may also include the transfer of records between naval components and non-DoD agencies in connection with the Personnel Exchange Program (PEP) and interagency support agreements. Disclosure accountings are not required for intra-agency disclosure and disclosures made in connection with interagency support agreements or the PEP. Although some disclosures authorized by this paragraph might also meet the criteria for disclosure under other exceptions specified in the following paragraphs of this section, they should be treated under this paragraph for disclosure accounting purposes.

(2) Disclosures required by the FOIA. (1) A record must be disclosed if required by 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988) as amended by the Freedom of Information Reform Act of 1986, which is implemented by Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E, “Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act Program.

(ii) 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988) as amended by the Freedom of Information Reform Act of 1986 and Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E, "Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act Program" require that records be made available to any person requesting them in writing, unless the record is exempt from disclosure under one of the nine FOIA exemptions. Therefore, if a record is not exempt from disclosure, it must be provided to the requester.

(iii) Certain records, such as personnel, medical, and similar files, are exempt from disclosure under exemption (b)(6) of 5 U.S.C. 552 (1988) as amended by the Freedom of Information Act Reform Act of 1986. Under that exemption, disclosure of information pertaining to an individual can be denied only when the disclosure would be a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. The first step is to determine whether a viable personal privacy interest exists in these records involving an identifiable living person. The second step is to consider how disclosure would benefit the general public in light of the content and context of the information in question. The third step is to determine whether the identified public interests qualify for consideration. The fourth step is to balance the personal privacy interests against the qualifying public interest. Numerous factors must be considered such as: The nature of the information to be disclosed (i.e., Do individuals normally have an expectation of privacy in the type of information to be disclosed?); importance of the public interest served by the disclosure and probability of further disclosure which may result in an unwarranted invasion of privacy; relationship of the requester to the public interest being served; newsworthiness of the individual to whom the information pertains (i.e., high ranking officer, public figure); degree of sensitivity of the information from the standpoint of the individual or the individual's family, and its potential for being misused to the harm, embarrassment, or inconvenience of the individual or the individual's family; the passage of time since the event which is the topic of the record (i.e., to disclose that an individual has been arrested and is being held for trial by court-martial is normally permitted, while to disclose an arrest which did not result in conviction might not be permitted after the passage of time); and the degree to which the information is already in the public domain or is already known by the particular requester.

(iv) Records or information from investigatory records, including personnel security investigatory records, are exempt from disclosure under the broader standard of "an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy” found in exemption (b)(7)(C) of 5 U.S.C. 552. This broader standard applies only to records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes.

(v) A disclosure under 5 U.S.C. 552 about military members must be in accordance with Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E, "Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act Program”, but the following information normally may be disclosed from military personnel records (except for those personnel assigned to sensitive or routinely deployable units, or located in a foreign territory), without a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy: Full name, rank, date of rank, base pay, past duty stations, present duty station and future duty station (if finalized), unless the stations have been determined by the Department of the Navy to be sensitive, routinely deployable, or located in a foreign territory, office or duty telephone number, source of commission, promotion sequence number, awards and decorations, attendance at professional military schools, and duty status at any given time.

(vi) The following information normally may be disclosed from civilian employee records about CONUS employees: Full name, present and past position titles and occupational series, present and past grades, present and past annual salary rates (including performance awards or bonuses, incentive awards, merit pay amount, Meritorious and Distinguished Executive Ranks, and allowances and differentials), past duty stations, present duty station and future duty station (if finalized), including room numbers, shop designations, or other identifying information regarding buildings or places of employment, unless the duty stations have been determined by the Department of the Navy to be sensitive, routinely deployable, or located in a foreign territory, position descriptions, identification of job elements, and those performance standards (but not actual performance appraisals) that the disclosure of which would not interfere with law enforcement programs or severely inhibit Department of the Navy effectiveness.

(viii) Disclosure of home addresses and home telephone numbers normally is considered a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy and is prohibited. However, they may be disclosed if the individual has consented to the disclosure; the disclosure is required by the FOIA; the disclosure is required by another law, such as 42 U.S.C. 653, which provides assistance to states in locating parents who have defaulted on child support payments, or the collection of alimony, and to state and local tax authorities for the purpose of enforcing tax laws. However, care must be taken prior to release to ensure that a written record is prepared to document the reasons for the release determination.

(A) When compiling home addresses and telephone numbers, the individual may be offered the option of authorizing disclosure of the information without further consent for specific purposes, such as locator services. In that case, the information may be disclosed for the stated purpose without further consent. If the information is to be disclosed for any other purpose, a signed consent permitting the additional disclosure must be obtained from the individual.

(B) Before listing home addresses and telephone numbers in Department of the Navy telephone directories, give the individual the opportunity to refuse such a listing. If the individual requests that the home address or telephone number not be listed in the directory, do not assess any additional fee associated with maintaining an unlisted number for government-owned telephone services.

(C) The sale or rental of lists of names and addresses is prohibited unless such action is specifically authorized by Federal law. This does not prohibit the disclosure of names and addresses made under Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5720.42E, "Department of the Navy Freedom of Information Act Program."

(D) In response to FOIA requests, information concerning special and general courts-martial results (e.g.,

records of trial) are releasable. However, information regarding summary courts-martial and non-judicial punishment are generally not releasable. The balancing of interests must be done. It is possible that in a particular case, information regarding non-judicial punishment should be disclosed pursuant to a FOIA request (i.e., the facts leading to a nonjudicial punishment are particularly newsworthy or the case involves a senior official abusing the public trust through office-related misconduct, such as embezzlement). Announcement of nonjudicial punishment dispositions under JAGMAN, subsection 0107, is a proper exercise of command authority and not a release of information under FOIA or this subpart and subpart G of this part. Exceptions to this policy must be coordinated with CNO (NO9B30) or CMC (MI3) prior to responding to requesters, including all requests for this type of information from members of Congress.

(3) Disclosures for established routine uses. (i) Records may be disclosed outside the Department of the Navy if the disclosure is for an established routine use.

(ii) A routine use shall:

(A) Be compatible with and related to the purpose for which the record was created;

(B) Identify the persons or organizations to whom the record may be disclosed;

(C) Identify specifically the uses for which the information may be employed by the receiving person or organization; and

(D) Have been published previously in the FEDERAL REGISTER.

(iii) A routine use shall be established for each user of the information outside the Department of the Navy who needs the information for an official purpose.

(iv) Routine uses may be established, discontinued, or amended without the consent of the individuals to whom the records pertain. However, new and amended routine uses must be published in the FEDERAL REGISTER at least 30 days before the information may be disclosed under their provisions.

(v) In addition to the routine uses established by the Department of the Navy for each system of records, common "Blanket Routine Uses," applicable to all record systems maintained with the Department of the Navy, have been established. These “Blanket Routine Uses” are published at the beginning of the Department of the Navy's FEDERAL REGISTER compilation of record systems notices rather than at each system notice and are also reflected in periodic Chief of Naval Operations Notes (OPNAVNOTES) 5211, “Current Privacy Act Issuances." Unless a system notice specifically excludes a system of records from a “Blanket Routine Use,” all “Blanket Routine Uses” apply to that system.

(vi) If the recipient has not been identified in the FEDERAL REGISTER or if the recipient, though identified, intends to employ the information for a purpose not published in the FEDERAL REGISTER, the written consent of the individual is required before the disclosure can be made.

(4) Disclosures to the Bureau of the Census. Records may be disclosed to the Bureau of the Census for purposes of planning or carrying out a census, survey, or related activities authorized by 13 U.S.C. 8.

(5) Disclosures for statistical research or reporting. Records may be disclosed to a recipient for statistical research or reporting if:

(i) Prior to the disclosure, the recipient has provided adequate written assurance that the records shall be used solely for statistical research or reporting; and

(ii) The records are transferred in a form that does not identify individuals.

(6) Disclosures to the National Archives and Records Administration. (i) Records may be disclosed to the National Archives and Records Administration for evaluation to determine whether the records have sufficient historical or other value to warrant preservation by the Federal government. If preservation is warranted, the records will be retained by the National Archives and Record Administration, which becomes the official owner of the records.

(ii) Records may be disclosed to the National Archives and Records Administration to carry out records management inspections required by Federal law.

(iii) Records transferred to a Federal Records Center operated by the National Archives and Records Administration for storage are not within this category. Those records continue to be maintained and controlled by the transferring naval activity. The Federal Records Center is considered the agent of Department of the Navy and the disclosure is made under $701.112(b)(1).

(7) Disclosures when requested for law enforcement purposes. (i) A record may be disclosed to another agency or an instrumentality of any governmental jurisdiction within or under the control of the U.S. for a civil or criminal law enforcement activity if:

(A) The civil or criminal law enforcement activity is authorized by law (federal, state or local); and

(B) The head of the agency (or his or her designee) has made a written request to the naval activity specifying the particular record or portion desired and the law enforcement purpose for which it is sought.

(ii) Blanket requests for any and all records pertaining to an individual shall not be honored. The requesting agency must specify each record or portion desired and how each relates to the authorized law enforcement activity.

(iii) If a naval activity discloses a record outside the Department of Defense for law enforcement purposes without the individual's consent and without an adequate written request, the disclosure must be under an established routine use, such as the “Blanket Routine Use" for law enforcement.

(iv) Disclosure to foreign law enforcement agencies is not governed by the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a and this paragraph, but may be made only under established “Blanket Routine Uses,” routine uses published in the individual record system notice, or to other governing authority.

(8) Disclosure to protect the health or safety of an individual. Disclosure may be made under emergency conditions involving circumstances affecting the health and safety of an individual (i.e., when the time required to obtain the consent of the individual to whom the records pertain might result in a delay which could impair the health or safety

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