Shakespeare in the New Europe

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Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova, Derek Roper
Bloomsbury Academic, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 384 pages
Shakespeare is the national poet of many nations besides his own, though a peculiarly subversive one in both East and West. This volume contains a score of new essays by scholars from Britain, Bulgaria, Croatia, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain, Ukraine and the USA, written to show how the momentous changes of 1989 were mirrored in the way Shakespeare has been interpreted and produced. Papers were circulated in draft, and discussed and developed at a symposium held at Sofia in May 1993. By then much evil as well as good had befallen the new Europe, but the sense of minds meeting in open friendly contact made this a hopeful occasion. The volume gives a valuable record of what Shakespeare has meant in our time and some pointers to what he may mean in the future.

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Contents

Preface
9
ERICA SHEEN
13
Introduction
15
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Michael Hattaway lectures in the Department of English Literature in the University of Sheffield. Boika Sokolova teaches in the University of Sofia. Derek Roper lectures in the Department of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. Michael Hattaway lectures in the Department of English Literature in the University of Sheffield. Michael Hattaway lectures in the Department of English Literature in the University of Sheffield. Boika Sokolova teaches in the University of Sofia. Derek Roper lectures in the Department of English Literature at the University of Sheffield.

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