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And trees, and shrubs, no longer budding seen,
Display the new-grown branch of lighter green;
On airy downs the shepherd idling lies,
And sees to - morrow in the marbled skies.

2) TWILIGHT REPOSB; MIDNIGHT STORM OI TRON

DBR AND LIGHT *).
Still twilight, welcome! Rest, how sweet art thou!
Now eve o'erhangs the western cloud's thick brow:
The far-stretch'd curtain of retiring light,
With hery treasures fraught; that on the sight
Flash from its bulging sides, where, darkness lours,
In Fancy's eye, a chain of mould'ring tow'rs;
Or craggy coasts just rising into view,
Midst jav'lins dire, and darts of screaming blue.

Anon tir'd labourers bless their shelt'ring home,
When midnight, and the frightful tempest come.
The Farmer wakes, and sees with silent dread
The angry shafts of Heaven gleam round his bed;
The bursting cloud reiterated roars,
Shakes his straw roof, and jars his bolted doors :
The slow-wing'd storm along the troubled skies
Spreads its dark course; the wind begins to rise;
And full - leaf 'd elms, his dwelling's shade by day,
With mimic thunder give its fury way,
Sounds in bis chimney top a doleful peal,
Midst pouring rain, or gusts of rattling hail;
With tenfold danger low the tempest bends,
And quick and strong the sulphurous flame descends:
The fright'ned mastiff from his kennel lies,
And cringes at the door with piteous cries.

Where now's the trifler? where the child of pride?
These are the moments when the heart is try'd!
Nor lives the man with conscience e'er so clear,
But feels a solemn, reverential fear;
Feels to a joy relieve his aching breast,

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When the spent storm hath howl'd itself toʻrest.
Still, welcome beats the long continued show'r,
And sleep protracted, comes with double pow'r;
Calms dreams of bliss bring on the morning sun,
For every barn is fillid, and harvest done!

3) AUTUMNAL EVENINGS; A WELCOME TO THE SNOWY

NIGHTS OF WINTER *).
I. safety hous'd, throughout Night's lengih'ning reign,
The cock 'sends forth a loud and piercing strain;
More frequent, as the glooms of midnight flee,
And hours roll round, that brought him liberty.
When Summer's early dawn, mild, clear, and bright,
Chas'd quick away the transitory night:
Hours now in darkness veil'd; yet loud the scream
Of geese impatient for the playful stream;
And all the feather'd tribe imprison'd raise
Their morning notes of inharmonious praise;
And many a clamorous hen and cockrel gay,
When daylight slowly through the fog breaks way,
Fly wantonly abroad: but ah, how goon
The shades of twilight follow hazy noon,
Short'ning the busy day! day that slides by
Amidst th' unfinish'd toils of husbandry:
Toils still each morn resum'd with double care,
To meet the icy terrors of the

year;
To rieet the threats of Boreas undismay'd,
And Winter's gathering frowns and hoary head.

Then welcome, cold; welcome, ye snowy nights !
Heaven midst your rage shall mingle pure delights,
And confidence of hope the soul sustain,
While devastation sweeps along the plain:
Nor shall the child of poverty despair,
But bless the power that rules the changing year; -
Assur'd, tho' horrors round his cottage reign,
That Spring will come, and Nature smile again.

*) Autuma.

4) ADDRESS TO THE DEITY"). Eternal Power! from whom those blessings flow, Teach me still more to wonder, more to know:. Seed - time and Harvest let me see again; Wander the leaf- strewn wood, the frozen plain : Let the first flower, corn - waving field, plain, tree, Here round my home, säill lift iny soul to Thee; And let me ever, midst thy bounties, raise An humble note of thankfulness and praise.

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4 n h a n 8.

I.

Alphabetisches Verzeichniss der Schriftsteller; von

denen Probestiicke in beiden Theilen des Handbuchs geliefert worden sind.

II. 242

Th. S. ADDISON (JOSEPH)

I. 66 a) Prosaische Stücke : I) The mountain of Miseries

1.

70 2) Continuation

I. 73 3) Learning proper for Women

J. 76 4) Time not to be squandered

I. 80 b) Poetische Stücke:

1) An Account of the greatest English Poets,
to Mr. Henry Sacheverell

II. 238
2) An Hymn
5) A Letter from Italy to the right honour-
able Charles Lord Halifax

II. 244 AIKIN [JOAN)

I. 525
The Hill of Science,
Vision

I. 526 A KENSIDE (MARK]

II. 406
1) All the natural Passions partake of a please
ing Sensation

II.
2) Natural and moral Advantages, resulting from
a sensible and well formed imagination II.

409 ARGILE [JOHN CAMPBELL, DUKE OF]

I.

go On the Augmentation of the Army

1.

92 ARMSTRONG (JOHN)

II. 457 Air

II. 459 BARBAULD [ANNA LAETITIA ] I) Ode to Spring

I. 586 2) Edwin and Ethelinde

II.

587 BEATTIE [JAMES ]

II. 566 1) The Hermic

II. 568 2) Elegy

II.

569 BERESTORD [BENJAMIN )

u. 1) To the Queen of Prussia on her Birth-day II. 2) Invitation to Joy

407.

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II. 584

II.

679 681 682

1

1. 489

1. 492 1. 497 II. 311 Il. 512 II. 697

701 702

Th, S. 3) Poem to Siama and Galmory

II. 682

Jl. 684 4) May- day in Livonia BLAIR (Huon]

I. 485 1) Historical view of the English language; its

irregularities accounted for;- its copiousness

compared with the French language
2) A few directions concerning the proper me.

thod of attaining a good Style in general

3) Advantages of retiring from the world BLAIR (ROBERT ]

The Grave, v. 112 - 350, and y. 655-768
BLOOMFIELD [ROPERT)

1) Personification of ibe Spring and her Atten-
dants

II. 699
2) Twilight Repose; midnight Storm of thun-
der and light

IL

700 (5) Autumnal evenings; a welcome to the snowy Nights of Winter

II. | 4) An Address to the Deity

II. BOLINGBROKE (Henny St. John, LORD VISCOUNT]

1. 151 Reflections on the general and usual state of Mankind

I. 142 Bruck (MICHAEL ]

IL 401 Elegy written in Spring

II. 405 BRYDONE [PATRICK ]

1. 550 Description of the ancient Syracuse

I. 550 DUAKE (EDMUND ]

I. 455 1) Speech on Ms. Fox's East - India Bill

I. 462 2) Old Constitution of France.; Consequences of the Revolution

I. 469 BURNET (GILBEAT]

1. Character of King Charles

LI

I. 65 BUANS (ROBERT ]

II. 546 1) To a mountain Daisy 2) Despondency, an Ode

II. 550 5) John Barleycorn

II. 553 BUTLER ( SAMUEL)

II.
Arms and equipage of Sir Hudibras

II. 173 CAMPBELL (George)

L 438 What are articulate Sounds capable of imitating, and in what degree?

I. 441 CARTER (ELIZABETH ]

IL. 581 Ode to Wisdom

II. 582 CHATHAM [WILLIAM Prrt, LORD ]

I. 510 1) Letter to his nephew Thomas Pitt, Esq. I. 515 2) Mr Pitt against Mr. Walpole

I. 516 3) On American Affairs

I. 517 CHAUCER (GEOFFERY)

II.

5 1) The Docioures Prologue

II. 2) The Doctoures Tale

u.

61

II. 548

170

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