The Secret of Wealth: A Common Sense Guide to Prosperity

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Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2007 - Business & Economics - 244 pages
THE SECRET OF WEALTH, A COMMON SENSE GUIDE TO PROSPERITY is not only a book about how to live a successful and wealthy life, it is-like all classics-a book on how to think. Its timeless wisdom contends that wealth is indeed a state of mind, not the result of extraordinary talents or a lottery windfall. Financial experts Napoleon Hill, Charles Haanel and James Allen, as well as business tycoons John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie have successfully built their immense wealth on the fundamental principles Hobbs describes here. You will learn: how a state of mind and behavior of successful people can be yours how opportunity never stops knocking at your door how to eliminate waste of money and goods how most pleasure is work and how most work can be made a pleasure how to find your proper calling in life how to get money, spend it, and save some of it how to live a free and independent life Before searching for a new job, contemplating a major purchase or making any speculative investments, discover the fundamental principles of THE SECRET OF WEALTH and reap the benefits for greater financial security.

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Contents

I
15
II
17
III
19
IV
23
V
26
VI
30
VII
32
VIII
35
XXXVI
122
XXXVII
126
XXXVIII
129
XXXIX
131
XL
134
XLI
138
XLII
141
XLIII
144

IX
38
X
41
XI
45
XII
49
XIII
52
XIV
54
XV
57
XVI
60
XVII
63
XVIII
65
XIX
70
XX
73
XXI
76
XXII
78
XXIII
81
XXIV
86
XXV
89
XXVI
93
XXVII
95
XXVIII
98
XXIX
101
XXX
104
XXXI
107
XXXII
111
XXXIII
115
XXXIV
118
XXXV
121
XLIV
147
XLV
151
XLVI
154
XLVII
158
XLVIII
161
XLIX
164
L
167
LI
170
LII
173
LIII
177
LIV
181
LV
184
LVI
187
LVII
190
LVIII
193
LIX
196
LX
198
LXI
200
LXII
204
LXIII
207
LXIV
210
LXV
213
LXVI
216
LXVII
219
LXVIII
223
LXIX
228
Copyright

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Page 120 - He is an American, who leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He becomes an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater.
Page 120 - Here individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men, whose labours and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world. Americans are the western pilgrims, who are carrying along with them that great mass of arts, sciences, vigour, and industry which began long since in the east; they will finish the great circle.
Page 57 - Neighbours, the Taxes are indeed very heavy, and if those laid on by the Government were the only Ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our Idleness, three times as much by our Pride, and four times as much by our Folly; and from these Taxes the Commissioners cannot ease or deliver us by allowing an Abatement. However let us hearken to good Advice, and something may be done for us; God...
Page 203 - Och! it hardens a' within, And petrifies the feeling! To catch dame Fortune's golden smile, Assiduous wait upon her; And gather gear by ev'ry wile That's justified by honour; Not for to hide it in a hedge, Nor for a train attendant; But for the glorious privilege Of being independent. The fear o...
Page 51 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Page i - In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality ; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both.
Page 33 - Then he goes on to warn his hearers how there is always a counterfeit in this world of the noblest message and teaching. Thus there are two freedoms — the false, where a man is free to do what he likes ; the true, where a man is free to do what he ought.
Page 85 - ... see if you cannot shift with them another year, either by scouring, mending, or even patching if necessary. Remember, a patch on your coat and money in your pocket is better and more creditable than a writ on your back and no money to take it off. 2. When you...

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