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God has had any share in it; which, worldly prudence, or a care for the soul has influenced the mind and action? Whether we give all the glory to our Master, or wish to appropriate part to ourselves ? For instance, when doing any duty in that state of life to which it has pleased God to call us, we may satisfy our fellow-men, and gain their approbation, but if we neglect to thank God for giving the ability, or fail in asking him to pardon the imperfections, and to accept the humble endeavour as proof of faith, and so of trust in the Saviour, rather than in human righteousness; how can any one who thus leaves his God out of the question, even in his good works; how can such a person say, that he is doing every thing heartily, as unto the Lord, and not rather seeking with eye service to please men? There plainly may be a great and deserved difference between two persons who in outward actions are perhaps the same. The one by the help of the Holy Spirit in secret thinks ever upon God, and he who seeth in secret will at the last reward his faithful stewardship openly. The other does not think of praying for the same help, his mind, therefore, is not under the same good influence of an equal sense of dependance. The consequence of which must be, that he will not

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receive the same reward at the last day. And this sentence is strictly according to justice, since the praise from men, which may follow as the result of kind actions to them, must make us guilty of robbery towards God, , should the voice of humble devotion not forward the glory on to him, “ for what hast thou, O man, which thou hast not received.”.

We could wish in all plainness of speech to open your minds to the necessity there is for prayer, the subject of which should distinctly be, that the grace of the Holy Spirit may be granted to each one of us, and lead our hearts according to the truth.

If to any, this seems a subject hard to be understood, or one that they have not considered heretofore as to its real importance, let them pray on their return home, and ask for that in which they have been so long wanting-feel now the reason for such prayer.

Who does not think it would be a delight to see our Saviour as he was upon earth ? to hear his gracious words, to mark all his doings for a pattern; yet, so much greater is the advantage of being taught inwardly by the Spirit of God, rather than through means of the outward senses only, that our Lord himself says, it was expedient for us he should go away, for adds he, “ if I go not away, the Comforter,”

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that is the Holy Spirit, “will not come unto

you, but if I depart I will send him unto

you.” When Christ declares, to continue his earthly presence was not so great a gift as to send the Holy Spirit, in what state must that man's heart be, who professes that he troubles not himself about the Holy Spirit ? Can there be a stronger instance of how proud and hard the human heart will grow, when it does not humble itself to ask for Divine assistance from above.

Hitherto, what has been said relates to the influence of the Holy Spirit upon man, as each soul stands separately in need of his assistance. But there is another office belonging to him-one not so personal, yet which brings his power home to our tenderest sensibilities; which must fill every feeling mind with the most affecting awe. 'Tis his promise to guide us in our prayers for others. The Spirit is then said to make intercession with groanings which cannot be uttered. No commandment is given more positively, or more frequently, than that we should pray for one another. There are many instances in Holy Writ of the wrath of God being turned away, in answer to the petitions, which his true servants offered ир

for others. St. James assures us that, “ the “ effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man

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tations, or that we need pray to God for no cleansing but from our faults. The best that man can do is lamentably imperfect, and requires the sanctifying influence of the Holy Spirit, to make it acceptable by Jesus Christ. Without him, the Prophet by the word of God assures us, that, “all our righteousnesses “ are as filthy rags.” The history of the first Gentile convert may clearly be a proof of it. Cornelius was a just man; he was frequent in prayer; he took care that his household should be pious; he gave much alms to the poor;

if this was enough, this he had done. But what followed ? God in mercy, for his sincerity sent an Angel to tell him where he might learn more, might learn the sanctification that is in Christ Jesus, and so make his good deeds what they should be, the offspring of a lively faith, as flowing from a heart religiously instructed in the knowledge of Christ, and religiously inclined in the faith of Christ, which in Scripture language is called a heart renewed by the power of the Holy Ghost.

With respect to other men, we can only judge of them by their actions, where we are called upon to judge, which is not often. But with respect to ourselves, we can go a step farther, we can examine not only what we do, but why we do it--whether the thought of

God has had any share in it; which, worldly prudence, or a care for the soul has influenced the mind and action? Whether we give all the glory to our Master, or wish to appropriate part to ourselves ? For instance, when doing any duty in that state of life to which it has pleased God to call us, we may satisfy our fellow-men, and gain their approbation, but if we neglect to thank God for giving the ability, or fail in asking him to pardon the imperfections, and to accept the humble endeavour as proof of faith, and so of trust in the Saviour, rather than in human righteousness ; how can any one who thus leaves his God out of the question, even in his good works; how can such a person say, that he is doing every thing heartily, as unto the Lord, and not rather seeking with eye service to please men? There plainly may be a great and deserved difference between two persons who in outward actions are perhaps the same. The one by the help of the Holy Spirit in secret thinks ever upon God, and he who seeth in secret will at the last reward his faithful stewardship openly. The other does not think of praying for the same help, his mind, therefore, is not under the same good influence of an equal sense of dependance. The consequence of which must be, that he will not

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