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WOMAN'S CURIOSITY.

Mrs. Hannah MORE.

A WORTHY Squire of sober life,
Ilad a conceited boasting wife;
Of him she daily made complaint,
Herself she thought a very saint.
She lov'd to load mankind with blame,
And on their errors build her fame.
Her favourite subject of dispute
Was Eve and the forbidden fruit.
“ Had I been Eve," she often cried,
"Man had not fall'n, nor woman died.
I still had kept the orders given,
Nor for an apple lost my

heaven;
To gratify my curious mind
I ne'er had ruin'd all mankind;
Nor from a vain desire to know,
Entailid on all my race such woe.
The Squire replied “ I fear 'tis true,
The same ill spirit lives in you;
Tempted alike, I dare believe,
You would have disobey'd like Eve.”
The lady storm'd and still denied
Both curiosity and pride.

The Squire some future day at dinner
Resolved to try this boastful sinner;
He griev'd such vanity possess'd her,
And thus in serious terms address'd her:
"Madam, the usual splendid feast
With which our wedding-day is grac'd
With you I must not share to-day,

For business summons me away. Of all the dainties I've prepared, I beg not any may be spar'd : Indulge in every costly dish; Enjoy, 'tis what I really wish:

a

glassy lake; uncurled by a breeze, unruffled by a breath of passion, it wants the wholesome agitation of the breaking wave—the health-giving, bracing power of the conflicting element that stirs the heart within, and nerves it for a noble effort.

All that he has of good within him is cramped by convenance and fashion ; for he who never feared the chance of fortune, trembles, with a coward's dread, before the sneer of the world. The poor man, however, only appeals to this test on a very different score. The “ world” may prescribe to him the fashion of his hat, or the colour of his coat—it may dictate the locale of his residence, and the style of his household, and he may, so far as in him lies, comply with a tyranny so absurd; but with the free sentiments of his nature his honest pride, his feeling sympathy—with the open current of his warm affection he suffers no interference: of this no man shall be the arbiter. If, then, the shoals and quicksands of the world deprive him of that tranquil guise and placid look—the enviable gift of richer men—he has, in requital, the unrestricted use of those greater gifts that God has given him, untrammelled by man's opinion, uncurbed by the control of “ the world.”

Each supports a tyranny after his own kind :

The rich man-above the dictates of fashion-subjects the thoughts of his mind and the meditations of his heart to the world's rule.

The poor man-below it-keeps these for his prerogative, and has no slavery save in form.

Happy the man who, amid all the seductions of wealth, and all the blandishments of fortune, can keep his heart and mind in the healthy exercise of its warm affections and its generous impulses. But still happier he, whose wealth, the native purity of his heart-can limit his desires to his means, and untrammelled by ambition, undeterred by fear of failure, treads the lowly but peaceful path in life, neither aspiring to be great, nor fearing to be humble.

(By permission of Messrs. Chapman and Hall.)

WOMAN'S CURIOSITY.

Mrs. Hannah MORE.

A WORTHY Squire of sober life,
Had a conceited boasting wife;
Of him she daily made complaint,
Herself she thought a very saint.
She lov'd to load mankind with blame,
And on their errors build her fame.
Her favourite subject of dispute
Was Eve and the forbidden fruit.
“Had I been Eve,” she often cried,
“Man had not fall'n, nor woman died.
I still had kept the orders given,
Nor for an apple lost my

heaven;
To gratify my curious mind
I ne'er had ruin'd all mankind;
Nor from a vain desire to know,
Entail'd on all my race such woe.
The Squire replied “I fear 'tis true,
The same ill spirit lives in you;
Tempted alike, I dare believe,
You would have disobey'd like Eve.”
The lady storm'd and still denied
Both curiosity and pride.

The Squire some future day at dinner
Resolved to try this boastful sinner;
He griev'd such vanity possess'd her,
And thus in serious terms address'd her :
“Madam, the usual splendid feast
With which our wedding-day is grac'd
With you I must not share to-day,
For business summons me away.
Of all the dainties I've prepared,
I beg not any may be spar'd:
Indulge in every costly dish;
Enjoy, 'tis what I really wish:

Only observe one prohibition,
Nor think it a severe condition :
On one small dish, which cover'd stands,
You must not dare to lay your hands;
Go–disobey not on your life,
Or henceforth you're no more my

wife.”
The treat was serv'd, the Squire was gone,
The murm’ring lady din'd alone;
She saw whate'er could grace a feast,
Or charm the eye, or please the taste;
But while she rang'd from this to that,
From ven'son haunch to turtle fat:
On one small dish she chanc'd to light,
By a deep cover hid from sight:
“Oh! here it is—yet not for me!
I must not taste, nay, dare not see:
Why place it there? or why forbid
That I so much as lift the lid ?
Prohibited of this to eat,
I care not for the sumptuous treat;
I wonder if 'tis fowl or fish,
To know what's there I merely wish.
I'll look-O no, I lose for ever,
If I'm betray'd, my husband's favour.
I own I think it vastly hard,
Nay, tyranny to he débarr'd.
John, you may go—the wine's decanted,
I'll ring or call you when you're wanted.”
Now left alone, she waits no longer,
Temptation presses more and stronger.
"I'll peep-the harm can ne'er be much,
For tho' I peep I will not touch;
Why I'm forbid to lift this cover
One glance will tell, and then 'tis over.
My husband's absent, so is John,
My peeping never can be known.”
Trembling, she yielded to her wish,
And rais'd the cover from the dish :

She starts—for lo! an open pie,
From which six living sparrows fly.
She calls, she screams with wild surprise,.
“Haste, John, and catch these birds,” she cries;
John hears not, but to crown her shame,
In at her call her husband came.
Sternly he frown'd, as thus he spoke:
6. Thus is

your vow'd allegiance broke !
Self-ign’rance led

you

to believe
You did not share the sin of Eve,
Like hers, how blest was your condition !
How small my gentle prohibition !
Yet you, tho' fed with every dainty,
Sat pining in the midst of plenty;
This dish, thus singled from the rest,
Of your obedience was the test;
Your mind, unbroke by self-denial,
Could not sustain this slender trial.
Humility from hence be taught,
Learn candour to another's fault;
Go, know, like Eve, from this sad dinner,
You're both a vain and curious sinner.”

THE SAGACITY OF THE SPIDER.

OLIVER GOLDSMITH.

Of all the solitary insects I have ever remarked, the spider is the most sagacious, and its actions, to me, who have attentively considered them, seem almost to exceed belief. This insect is formed by nature for a state of war, not only upon other insects, but upon each other. For this state, nature seems perfectly well to have formed it. Its head and breast are covered with a strong natural coat of mail, which is impenetrable to the attempts of every other insect, and its belly is enveloped in a soft pliant skin, which eludes the sting even of a

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