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Apotheosis of the Country, especially of such Portions of the Coun

try as the Author has for sale. - Many Attractions and still more Lots at Flushing. ---Simplicity of Farming, and Lucidity of Agricultural Books.-Profits and Pleasures of Rural Life.......Page ix

CHAPTER I.

A COW.

Special Points about the Bovine Race.—Directions in Feeding.--

Preparations to receive the Animal.--Her Arrival.-An awful
Pause. --The Fray about to begin.-Intelligence of Cows and Bid-
dies.- Victory.—A Calm.—Cow Complainings.- Approaching
Storm.-A Tempest in a back Yard. --Soothing Effects of “Mash."

- Immense Profits and glorious Prospects for the Future. Pe-
culiarities and Eccentricities of the Race as exhibited in a con-
fined Space.—She is sent to the Country for the benefit of her
Health ........

19

CHAPTER II.

A HOUSE, PLANS, AND SPECIFICATIONS.

Wonderful architectural Genius of the Author: -He admires himself

and consults his Friends. — Difficulties in obtaining “just the Thing.”_Want of Time.—Free Trade in Houses advocated as superior to Home Production.—The imported Article falls into the Hands of a Philistine named Barney.-A fresh Arrival. – The House comes, but the Builder does not.—The Charge of the Light Brigade, and Flight of the Housekeeper.........

37

CHAPTER III.

-A

MORE LIVE-STOCK-A HORSE AND A PIG.

WHICH IS THE NOBLER

ANIMAL ?

Beauties of the Pig.-Defects of the Horse. -The dearest Pig and

the dearest Horse, each in their way.-A haunted House, and the

Effect of Ghosts on Horses.—The Ghost Story precisely as it occurred. --Are Ghosts liable to Damages when they frighten Horses into fits of running away?-Equine Eccentricities. -Practical Playfulness.....

...Page 61

CHAPTER IV.

THE COUNTRY, AND HOW TO GET THERE.

Easy Accessibility of Flushing. -An improving Railroad.—Educa

tion by Steam.-- True Principles of Travel.....

77

CHAPTER V.

A WELL.

A Well, considered classically and otherwise.-A Cat in search of

the Truth.-A Catastrophe. -Pumps and Vanities of Life.—A poor Sucker.--Hydraulic Pressure......

86

CHAPTER VI.

A KITCHEN GARDEN.

Advantages thereof. --Things to have.—You wish you may get them.

-Ornamental as opposed to practical Views.-A dissolving View. ---Bad Beginnings do not always make a good Ending.--Daniel O'Rourke's as a grazing Crop.—The new-mown Hay.—Its Flavor and Flower.-Remarkable Results of Gardening for Profit...... 97

CHAPTER VII.

THE FLOWER GARDEN.

Architectural Skill set at defiance by practical Difficulties. -Result of too much Greenness.-A Disappointment.

111

CHAPTER VIII.

POULTRY.

Strange Attack of Somnolency. -Dogs and Peppers as awakeners.

-The right Thing in the wrong Place.—A Hen lays herself out.
-Twenty pair of Chickens raise the Hair of one Mink........ 124

CHAPTER IX.

FALL WORK,

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A Fortune in Strawberries. --How to get it out. -Debility developed.

-Science to the Rescue.--The wonderful Effects of a Liquid Fer

tilizer. – No Farmer should fail to have such a Thing in the

....Page 136

House.......

CHAPTER X.

PROFIT AND LOSS.

Immense pecuniary Advantages of high old Farming.–Exactitude

the Foundation of Success in Life.--A plain Statement.-General Reflections.-An amateur Butcher.-—Boiled salt Pork......... 148

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A new Start, with no Drawbacks.—Immense Results, but not pre

cisely what was wanted. The great Pea turns out small.—Wonderful obstinacy of Plants .....

169

CHAPTER XIII.

SCIENCE.

Knowledge is Power. --The new Flower.--A Thing of Beauty.- Ap

pearance contrasted with Perfume. --The Fox is the Finder.. 179

CHAPTER XIV.

A SECOND DIGRESSION-FAIRY TALES FOR LITTLE FOLKS.

Retributive Justice.—Don't be such a Goose......

.

189 CHAPTER XVII.

CHAPTER XV.

NUISANCES, INHUMAN AND HUMAN. PETS THE CHARM OF COUN

TRY LIFE.

With a few Reservations.-Flies on the Rampage.--Wonderful Dis

covery.—Dogs on Seedlings.-A Hop-toad Hunt.......... 203

CHAPTER XVI.

BUTTER-MAKING.

SEEDS AND THE DEVIL.

Butter-making in all its Attractions.—The Cream unequal to the

Emergency.—Some Things can't be Done as well as Others.Electrical Phenomena.-Gathering Seed. - Incidental Reference to Satan and his Works--not his agricultural ones.............. 216

SUCCESS OF THE YEAR.

A second Year's Balance-sheet. - Still greater Promises. --Success

assured. —Every Man should be his own Market Gardener. - No dearth of Onions.-Transported at the Result. -The last of the family Horse.—He closes his Career by a wonderful Feat in drawing Teeth......

.Page 233

CHAPTER XVIII.

PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL.

The window Garden. - Warm Work.Immense Resources of Sci

ence. -Mind against Matter.—What can the Matter be ? — The new Flower

253

CHAPTER XIX.

A GREAT RUNNER.

A perfect Jonah.--Very fine, only don't do it again. - A Gourd

runs away with its Master.--A changeable Crimson.-A new Specimen of Flax, Red one Year and Yellow the next......... 266

CHAPTER XX.

A BEAUTIFUL NEW COACH.

A Rockaway stricken with Palsy.-Sudden Recovery.-Honesty of

country Mechanics their best Recommendation. -A Roof over one's Head.-Its Necessity, as well as Beauty.-A Fellow-feeling makes us willing to lend Shingles.-The latter End............ 283

In the end

INTRODUCTION.

IT T was in consequence of reading a little volume

called “ Ten Acres Enough”-a practical and statistical, as well as, in certain points, a poetical production—that I came to prepare this volume. In that work a charming and interesting account is given of the successful attempt of a Philadelphia mechanic to redeem a strip of exhausted land of ten acres in extent. In the course of it, a vast deal of advice and most valuable directions are given on the subject of planting and sowing, draining and reaping, manuring and pruning; berries and fruits, vines and vegetables, are duly considered; and the question of outlay and income, expenses and receipts, losses and profits, is forever ding-donged into one's ears. So useful is the instruction it contains, that no one should think of buying a farm, experimenting in rural life, or even reading this book, without first perusing that one. To be sure, the author forgets occasionally some minor matters—such as clothing, food, and the

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