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CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION.

Apotheosis of the Country, especially of such Portions of the Country as the Author has for sale.—Many Attractions and still more Lots at Flushing.—Simplicity of Farming, and Lucidity of Agricultural Books.—Profits and Pleasures of Rural Life....... Page ix

CHAPTER I.
A COW.

Special Points about the Bovine Race.—Directions in Feeding.— Preparations to receive the Animal.—Her Arrival.—An awful Pause.—The Fray about to begin.—Intelligence of Cows and Biddies.—Victory.— A Calm.—Cow Complainings.—Approaching Storm.—A Tempest in a back Yard.—Soothing Effects of “Mash.” —Immense Profits and glorious Prospects for the Future. — Peculiarities and Eccentricities of the Race as exhibited in a confined Space.—She is sent to the Country for the benefit of her Health....................................................................... 19

CHAPTER II.
A HOUSE, PLANS, AND SPECIFICATIONS.

Wonderful architectural Genius of the Author.—He admires himself and consults his Friends. – Difficulties in obtaining “just the Thing.”—Want of Time.—Free Trade in Houses advocated as superior to Home Production.—The imported Article falls into the Hands of a Philistine named Barney.—A fresh Arrival.— The House comes, but the Builder does not.—The Charge of the Light Brigade, and Flight of the Housekeeper..................... 37

CHAPTER III. MORE LIVE-STOCK-A HORSE AND A PIG. WHICH IS THE NOBLER ANIMAL 2

Beauties of the Pig.—Defects of the Horse.—The dearest Pig and the dearest Horse, each in their way.—A haunted House, and the Effect of Ghosts on Horses.—The Ghost Story precisely as it occurred.—Are Ghosts liable to Damages when they frighten Horses into fits of running away?—Equine Eccentricities.—Practical Playfulness................................................................. Page 61

CHAPTER IV.
THE COUNTRY, AND HOW TO GET THERE.

Easy Accessibility of Flushing.—An improving Railroad.—Education by Steam.—True Principles of Travel.......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

CHAPTER V.
A WIELL.

A Well, considered classically and otherwise.—A Cat in search of the Truth.-A Catastrophe.—Pumps and Vanities of Life.—A poor Sucker.—Hydraulic Pressure.................................... 86

CHAPTER VI.
A KITCHEN GARDEN.

Advantages thereof.-Things to have.—You wish you may get them. —Ornamental as opposéd to practical Views.-A dissolving View. —Bad Beginnings do not always make a good Ending.—Daniel O'Rourke's as a grazing Crop.–The new-mown Hay.-Its Flavor and Flower.—Remarkable Results of Gardening for Profit...... 97

CHAPTER VII.
THE FLOWER GARDEN.

Architectural Skill set at defiance by practical Difficulties.—Result of too much Greenness.-A Disappointment...................... 111.

CHAPTER VIII. - POULTRY.

Strange Attack of Somnolency.—Dogs and Peppers as awakeners. —The right Thing in the wrong Place.—A Hen lays herself out. —Twenty pair of Chickens raise the Hair of one Mink........ 124.

CHAPTER IX.
FAILL WORK.

A Fortune in Strawberries.—How to get it out.—Debility developed. —Science to the Rescue.—The wonderful Effects of a Liquid Fer

tilizer. — No Farmer should fail to have such a Thing in the House.......~....................................................... Page 136 CHAPTER X. PROFIT AND LOSS. Immense pecuniary Advantages of high old Farming.—Exactitude the Foundation of Success in Life.—A plain Statement.—General Reflections.—An amateur Butcher.—Boiled salt Pork......... 148 CHAPTER XI. THE FLUSHING SKATING-POND- A DIGRESSION.

A nice Man as an Ice-man......... •e & © e e o os e s is e o e s to e o 'o e... • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I 61 CHAPTER XII. * THE SECOND YEAR.

A new Start, with no Drawbacks.-Immense Results, but not precisely what was wanted.—The great Pea turns out small.—Wonderful obstimacy of Plants........"..................................... 169

CHAPTER XIII.
SCIENCE. *

Knowledge is Power.—The new Flower.—A Thing of Beauty.—Appearance contrasted with Perfume.—The Fox is the Finder... 179

CHAPTER XIV.
A SECOND DIGRESSION-FAIRY TALES FOR LITTLE FOLKS.

Retributive Justice.—Don’t be such a Goose........................ I 89

CHAPTER XV.

NUISANCEs, INHUMAN AND HUMAN. PETS-THE CHARM OF COUNTRY LIFE.

With a few Reservations.—Flies on the Rampage.—Wonderful Discovery.—Dogs on Seedlings.-A Hop-toad Hunt............... 203

CHAPTER XVI. BUTTER-MARING. SEEDS AND THE DEVIL. Butter-making in all its Attractions.—The Cream unequal to the Emergency.—Some Things can't be Done as well as Others.

Electrical Phenomena. –Gathering Seed.—Incidental Reference to Satan and his Works—not his agricultural ones.............. 216

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A second Year's Balance-sheet.—Still greater Promises.—Success assured.—Every Man should be his own Market Gardener.—No dearth of Onions.—Transported at the Result.—The last of the family Horse.—He closes his Career by a wonderful Feat in drawing Teeth............................................................ Page 233

CHAPTER XVIII.
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL.

The window Garden.—Warm Work.-Immense Resources of Science.—Mind against Matter.—What can the Matter be?—The new Flower............................................................... 253

CHAPTER XIX.
A. GREAT RUNNER. .

A perfect Jonah. —Very fine, only don't do it again. — A Gourd runs away with its Master.—A changeable Crimson.—A new Specimen of Flax, Red one Year and Yellow the next......... 266

CHAPTER XX.
A BEAUTIFUL NEw CoACH.

A Rockaway stricken with Palsy.—Sudden Recovery.—Honesty of country Mechanics their best Recommendation.—A Roof over one's Head.—Its Necessity, as well as Beauty.—A Fellow-feeling makes us willing to lend Shingles.—The latter End............ 283

I N T R O DU C T IO N.

T was in consequence of reading a little volume called “Ten Acres Enough”—a practical and statistical, as well as, in certain points, a poetical production—that I came to prepare this volume. In that work a charming and interesting account is given of the successful attempt of a Philadelphia mechanic to redeem a strip of exhausted land of ten acres in extent. In the course of it, a vast deal of advice and most valuable directions are given on the subject of planting and sowing, draining and reaping, manuring and pruning; berries and fruits, vines and vegetables, are duly considered; and the question of outlay and income, expenses and receipts, losses and profits, is forever ding-donged into one's ears. So useful is the instruction it contains, that no one should think of buying a farm, experimenting in rural life, OI’ even reading this book, without first perusing that one. To be sure, the author forgets occasionally Some minor matters—such as clothing, food, and the

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