The United States Navy and the Vietnam Conflict: From military assistance to combat, 1959-1965

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Naval History Division, Department of the Navy, 1977 - Vietnam War, 1961-1975

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Page 330 - Treaty, the United States is, therefore, prepared, as the President determines, to take all necessary steps, including the use of armed force, to assist any member or protocol state of the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty requesting assistance in defense of its freedom.
Page 61 - Their missile power will be the shield from behind which they will slowly, but surely, advance— through Sputnik diplomacy, limited brush-fire wars, indirect non-overt aggression, intimidation and subversion, internal revolution, increased prestige or influence, and the vicious blackmail of our allies.
Page 5 - Arthur J. Dommen, Conflict in Laos: The Politics of Neutralization (New York: Praeger, 1971) focuses on the involvement of Laos in the Indochina wars from 1945 to 1969.
Page 537 - York we set about arresting the progress of all vessels we saw, firing off guns to the right and left, to make every ship that was running in heave to, or wait until we had leisure to send a boat on board 'to see,' in our lingo, 'what she was made of.
Page 539 - ... or upon the decks of the shipping. All was noise and bustle. The carters were driving in every direction; and the sailors and labourers upon the wharfs, and on board the vessels, were moving their ponderous burthens from place to place.
Page 61 - We intend to re-examine and reorient our forces of all kinds— our tactics and our institutions here in this community. We intend to intensify our efforts for a struggle in many ways more difficult than war, where disappointment will often accompany us.
Page 61 - Too long we have fixed our eyes on traditional military needs, on armies prepared to cross borders or missiles poised for flight. Now it should be clear that this is no longer enough— that our security may be lost piece by piece, country by country, without the firing of a single missile or the crossing of a single border.
Page 539 - Bales of cotton, wool, and merchandize ; barrels of pot-ash, rice, flour, and salt provisions ; hogsheads of sugar, chests of tea, puncheons of rum, and pipes of wine ; boxes, cases, packs and packages of all sizes and denominations, were strewed upon the wharfs and landing-places, or upon the decks of the shipping.

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