Librarian, Being an Account of Scarce, Valuable, and Useful English Books, Manuscript Libraries, Public Records, Volume 1

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Page 241 - EBORACUM: Or the History and Antiquities of the City of York, from its Original to the present Times. Together with the History of the Cathedral Church, and the Lives of the Archbishops...
Page 211 - Tome of an exact Chronological Vindication and Historical Demonstration of our British, Roman, Saxon, Danish, Norman, English Kings...
Page 281 - Noble madam, Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We write in water.
Page 94 - An act for continuing to his Majesty certain duties on malt, sugar, tobacco, and snuff, in Great Britain ; and on pensions, offices, and personal estates, in England; for the service of the year 1816.
Page 93 - For appointing Commissioners to inquire into the fees, gratuities, perquisites, and emoluments which are or lately have been received in the several public offices to be therein mentioned; to examine into any abuses which may exist in the same; and to report such observations as shall occur to them for the better concluding and managing the business transacted in the said offices.
Page 78 - An Account of the Preservation of King Charles II. after the Battle of Worcester, drawn up by himself. To which are added, his letters to several persons.
Page 89 - Transactions of the Royal Society, and of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and the Histories of Gibbon, Robertson and Hume.
Page 184 - They are a treasure that are not fit for every man's view; nor is every man capable of making use of them : only I would have nothing of these books printed, but entirely preserved together for the use of the industrious learned members of that society.
Page 140 - The Theory of Dreams, in which an Inquiry is made into the Powers and Faculties of the Human Mind, as they are illustrated in the most remarkable Dreams recorded in sacred and profane History.
Page 281 - In giving a relation of the facts concerning the illness of Mr. Porson, I cannot let the opportunity escape me, our official situations bringing us a good deal together, of lamenting in common with his most intimate friends, the loss of so pleasing and so valuable an acquaintance; for to the most gigantic powers of learning and criticism were united the manners of a gentleman, and the inoffensive habits of a child; and I am sorry to have occasion to observe, in concluding this narrative...

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